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78,000 Cases Chikengunya Including Maharahstra

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    Posted: April 23 2006 at 3:23pm

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Over 78,000 cases of chikungunya reported in State

Nagesh Prabhu

Disease said to be widespread in Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra


  • Disease was prevalent in North Karnataka
  • It has now spread to Bangalore, Tumkur and Kolar districts

    BANGALORE: Chikungunya, a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes, is widely prevalent in the State, and over 78,000 people in 61 taluks have been infected.

    The disease, which was so far concentrated in the districts of North Karnataka, has now spread to Bangalore Rural, Bangalore Urban, Tumkur and Kolar districts. As many as 78,175 people had been infected with the disease in 101 taluk of 15 districts till Wednesday. Symptoms include high fever and pain in the limbs. The disease is widespread in neighbouring Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra.

    The highest number of people infected is in Gulbarga district (31,304) followed by Raichur (14,614), Tumkur (10,818), Bidar (9,784), Chitradurga (3867), Bellary (3358), Bangalore Rural (476), Kolar (206) and Bangalore Urban (87). Over 600 villages in Gulbarga district and 360 villages in Bidar district have been affected, Basavaraju, Commissioner, Health and Family Welfare Services, told The Hindu on Thursday.

    Senior scientists from the National Institute of Virology, Pune, visited some of the affected areas. They collected blood samples from 1,437 people of which 63 tested positive: 43 in Bidar, four in Bagalkot, nine in Raichur and seven in Gulbarga. However, no one has died of the disease so far. The Department of Health and Family Welfare has taken steps on a war footing to control the disease. Officials have undertaken both indoor and outdoor fogging in the affected villages as part of the preventive measures. But there is a shortage of fogging and spraying equipment. The Government has decided to buy equipment from Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu.

    Doctors have been sent to Gulbarga, Bellary, Bidar, Raichur, Bijapur and Tumkur where a large number of people have been infected. There is no vaccine or treatment for the viral infection, which is self-limiting. So prevention is the best measure, he said.

    Pots, containers and drums used for storing water should be covered properly and overhead tanks cleaned regularly to prevent the breeding of mosquitoes, he added.



  • Edited by fluprepper - April 23 2006 at 3:30pm
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 23 2006 at 3:32pm
     Province of Karnataka.
    Southern part of India.


    Edited by fluprepper - April 23 2006 at 3:35pm
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    chargingbear View Drop Down
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chargingbear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 12:11am
    >They collected blood samples from 1,437 people of which 63 tested positive:<

    so what did the
     test results show of the other
    1,374
     

    samples that were sick?
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chargingbear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 12:17am


    >Symptoms include high fever

    and pain in the limbs
    .<

    so we have 1374 samples that experience these unexplained symptoms got to make one wonder..




    Edited by chargingbear - April 24 2006 at 12:18am
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Acesh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 8:42am

    These people tested positive for WHAT illness?  All I can see is dirty drinking water and it's spread by mosquitoes... and now it's spreadingto other large areas in the country?  What do they say it is???

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scott Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 8:59am
    Acesh.....Said it perfectly......WHAT illness do they have?
    As the Dark Horse Approaches.
    Improvise Adapt and Overcome!
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scott Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 9:04am

    Here is what the article says they have:
    Link here:


    Chikungunya
    is a relatively rare form of viral fever caused by an alphavirus that is spread by mosquito bites from the Aedes aegypti mosquito. The name is derived from the Makonde word meaning "that which bends up" in reference to the stooped posture developed as a result of the arthritic symptoms of the disease. The disease was first described by Marion Robinson[1] and W.H.R. Lumsden[2] in 1955, following an outbreak on the Makonde Plateau, along the border between Tanganyika and Mozambique, in 1952. Chikungunya is closely related to O'nyong'nyong virus[3].

    Chikungunya is not considered to be fatal. However, in 2005-2006, 77 deaths have been associated with chikungunya on Réunion island.


    Hope this helps. Atleast not bird flu.

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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote schnards Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 11:50am
    Sorry, what I don't understand is, this virus is just given to humans by mosquitos?! If this is fact, my question is - is it possible that more than 70.000 people catch this virus in a short period???? Doesn't it looks like an airborne "thing"???
    sane sane they're all insane
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 12:50pm
    schnards - i agree with you , until reunion, chikungunya never spread quite like this - something has happened to this virus a bad mutation or the other option is a change in the mosquito population i.e increase in numbers or they just now perfer more human blood.
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GingerT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 12:57pm

    You cannot have chikungunya or malaria epidemics without mosquitos.

    It has been DRY season in India for the past 5 months. VERY few mosquitoes and hardly any rain.
    Stupidity has its limits.
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote schnards Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 1:24pm
    So please give me your opinion regarding this case. Doesn't it looks like the first really big BF outbreak which is really out of control?
    sane sane they're all insane
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GingerT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 1:35pm
    My personal opinion is that it is bird flu blowing in a mild form---a new form of human pandemic influenza---but what exact flu, I do not know.  
     
    Maybe it is H5N1, and maybe something else. Whatever it is, India will not tell anyone, even if they know, until hundreds of people suddenly die of it in one place in one day. Hopefully, this virus, whatever it is, will never attain the ability to be supremely deadly like the flu virus of 1918.
     
    India suffered more flu deaths than any other country in the world in 1918, estimated deaths in India were between 20 to 40 million.
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chargingbear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 1:35pm
    Originally posted by schnards schnards wrote:

    So please give me your opinion regarding this case. Doesn't it looks like the first really big BF outbreak which is really out of control?


    kinda makes me wonder if its not a dead end, for its host in india for it anymore


     and its mixing with H5n1
    strain


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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gravitation Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 1:47pm
    78000!!! That's the size of my town!!!
    Inscriptions and Birddroppings are the only two things in Egypt that give any indication of life - Flaubert
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote schnards Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 2:01pm
    Also I wonder, that there is no follow up in the press or any other media. If it spread so fast like they wrote, how many people will be infected yet?? If the number of infected people grows - assuming that it's really BF - they must tell the rest of the world that there is such a huge outbreak! 
    sane sane they're all insane
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote endman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 2:40pm
    But are they reporting any deaths or increase in mortality rate?
    If this virus is airborne or spread by mosquitoes but what kind of mosquitoes 
    Maybe regular mosquitoes can now spread this virus anyway this thing could land here in US any day on any flight should we worry about Chikungunya now
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 3:01pm
    If it is Chikungunya then there shouldn`t be to much to worry about people brought it back from reunion to france and  there is no major outbreak there ( as there are no mosquetos ) but numbers are worringly high if it is h5n1 then this is the start and we will know real soon.......
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote schnards Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 3:23pm
    Sorry again! Mayby I'm to afraid of it all, but  out of my sight there are also some important political signs which brings myself in an allert situation. The President of China visited G.W. Bush last week, the Indian prime minister visited Germany this week, the G8 meeting last week, where they also had that topic BF - pandemic. So, I think when we summarize everything we know, we heard and we read, and you can really say it's speculative - it must be speculative if you watch the information and news situation we have - we all know that it's more than realistic, that the BF outbreak, after all the reported clusters, is there! Am I right or wrong? Let me know! I live in Germany, and here in the daily news bird flu doesn't exsist!!!!
    sane sane they're all insane
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    Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2006 at 4:02pm
    Travelers' Health Home > Travel Notices > Outbreak Notice

    Outbreak Notice
    Chikungunya Fever in India
    This information is current as of today, < = =text/> April 24, 2006, 11:52:50 PM

    Released: April 21, 2006

    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of infected Aedes and Culex mosquitoes including the daytime-biting Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus species. Symptoms can include sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, nausea, vomiting, joint pain with or without swelling, low back pain, and rash. The symptoms are very similar to those of dengue but, unlike dengue, there is no hemorrhagic or shock syndrome form. This disease is almost always self-limited and rarely fatal. In addition to ongoing outbreaks on the Indian Ocean islands of Mayotte, Mauritius, Réunion (territory of France), and the Seychelles, a chikungunya fever outbreak has been reported from three states in India (Karnataka, Maharastra, and Andra Pradesh). Travelers to all these areas are recommended to take precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

    Prevention Measures

    There are no preventive medications or FDA-approved vaccines for chikungunya fever, but there are steps travelers can take to reduce their risk of being bitten by infected mosquitoes.

    • Use insect repellent on exposed skin surfaces when outdoors, particularly during the day.
      • Repellents containing 30% to 50% DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) are recommended. Lower concentrations of DEET offer shorter-term protection requiring more frequent reapplication.
      • Repellents containing picaridin are available in the U.S. only in low-concentration (7%) formulations, which require frequent reapplication. Repellents with higher concentration formulations of picaridin may be available in some regions outside the U.S.
    • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outdoors.
      • Clothing may also be sprayed with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent for greater protection.
    • Stay in hotels or resorts that are well screened or air-conditioned and that take measures to reduce the mosquito population, where possible.
    • Reduce Aedes breeding sites by emptying standing water that may have collected in containers (e.g., uncovered barrels, flower vases, or cisterns) and either overturning the vessels or covering the opening.
    • If illness develops, stay under a mosquito net or indoors to limit mosquito bites and to avoid further spread of infection.

    These preventive measures are the same steps that one would take to reduce the risk of other mosquito transmitted infectious diseases such as dengue and yellow fever.

    Treatment

    No specific drug treatment against chikungunya virus is available; thus, treatment of chikungunya fever is supportive: bed rest, fluids, and mild pain medications such as ibuprofen, naproxen, acetaminophen, or paracetamol may relieve symptoms of fever and aching. Because aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding and possibly Reye syndrome, it should be avoided during the acute stages of the illness. Few cases are severe enough to warrant hospitalization. All persons with chikungunya fever should be protected against additional mosquito bites to reduce the risk of further transmission of the virus.

    For more information about chikungunya fever, see http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/Chikungunya/chickvfact.htm.


    Edited by fluprepper - April 24 2006 at 4:04pm
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    New!Chikungunya Fever Fact Sheet

    What is chikungunya fever?
    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of infected mosquitoes. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a member of the genus Alphavirus, in the family Togaviridae. CHIKV was first isolated from the blood of a febrile patient in Tanzania in 1953, and has since been identified repeatedly in west, central and southern Africa and many areas of Asia, and has been cited as the cause of numerous human epidemics in those areas since that time. The virus circulates throughout much of Africa, with transmission thought to occur mainly between mosquitoes and monkeys.  

    What type of illness does chikungunya virus cause?
    CHIKV infection can cause a debilitating illness, most often characterized by fever, headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, rash, and joint pain.  The term ‘chikungunya’ is Swahili for ‘that which bends up.’

    The incubation period (time from infection to illness) can be 2-12 days, but is usually 3-7 days. “Silent” CHIKV infections (infections without illness) do occur; but how commonly this happens is not yet known.

    Acute chikungunya fever typically lasts a few days to a couple of weeks, but as with dengue, West Nile fever, o'nyong-nyong fever and other arboviral fevers, some patients have prolonged fatigue lasting several weeks. Additionally, some patients have reported
    incapacitating joint pain, or arthritis which may last for weeks or months.
    The prolonged joint pain associated with CHIKV is not typical of dengue. Co-circulation of dengue fever in many areas may mean that chikungunya fever cases are sometimes clinically misdiagnosed as dengue infections, therefore the incidence of chikungunya fever could be much higher than what has been previously reported.

    No deaths, neuroinvasive cases, or hemorrhagic cases related to CHIKV infection have been conclusively documented in the scientific literature.

    CHIKV infection (whether clinical or silent) is thought to confer life-long immunity.

    How do humans become infected with chikungunya virus?
    CHIKV is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on a person infected with CHIKV. Monkeys, and possibly other wild animals, may also serve as reservoirs of the virus. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other humans when they bite.

    Aedes aegypti (the yellow fever mosquito), a household container breeder and aggressive daytime biter which is attracted to humans, is the primary vector of CHIKV to humans. Aedes albopictus (the Asian tiger mosquito)may also play a role in human transmission is Asia, and various forest-dwelling mosquito species in Africa have been found to be infected with the virus.

    Where does chikungunya virus occur?
    The geographic range of the virus is Africa and Asia. For information on current outbreaks, consult CDC’s Travelers’ Health website (www.cdc.gov/travel). Given the current large CHIKV epidemics and the world wide distribution of Aedes aegypti, there is a risk of importation of CHIKV into new areas by infected travelers.

    How is chikungunya virus infection treated?
    No vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for chikungunya fever is available. Treatment is symptomatic--rest, fluids, and ibuprofen, naproxen, acetaminophen, or paracetamol may relieve symptoms of fever and aching. Aspirin should be avoided



    Edited by fluprepper - April 24 2006 at 4:12pm
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