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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

Getting ready for climate change

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KiwiMum View Drop Down
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    Posted: November 27 2018 at 4:12pm
There was a really interesting discussion thread on here about gas concentrations and ever since reading it I've been thinking about a global solution, and I think I came up with an excellent one that I outlined on the thread. However, I don't think that will be implemented until catastrophe strikes and by then it will be too late.

So, sad though it makes me to say this, I think the best course of action is for each enlightened individual to their own preparations to future proof their property and life against the draconian measures that one day will have to be forced on us all.

These preps would be very similar to the ones for surviving the end of the world as we know it but needn't be quite so survivalistic in nature.

I think we are standing in a small window of opportunity when the resources, and more importantly, the access to the resources we will need to make our life bearable in the future are freely available to us now, and we should all make the most of it and access them while we can.
If it is to be, it is up to me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CRS, DrPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 27 2018 at 4:30pm
Thanks, KiwiMum!

People are not used to thinking in terms of planetary catastrophes - I think many delude themselves that there will be some kind of technology magic bullet

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 27 2018 at 6:34pm
The thing is Chuck, that I'm a community spirited person and I'm not particularly selfish because I can afford to be generous - not financially, but with my time, assistance and intelligence. I'm happy to muck in on a working bee and I don't mind being the one who cleans the toilets. I just like being part of a team.

But on this issue, after years of trying, I've finally realised that as we get down to the wire, it's a case of every man for himself. As a wife and mother I have a family to care for and right now I am thinking what can I do that will make life bearable for us.

I've been familiar with the term "lifeboat" in survivalist circles for a long time, but now I'm applying it to us and our situation. I'm building a lifeboat.

I think each of us on here should be doing the same thing.
If it is to be, it is up to me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 28 2018 at 7:43am
I want to say: "HEAR HEAR!" or "WELL SAID!" but they are cliches.

Perhaps, KiwiMum, actions speak louder than words.

Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CRS, DrPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 28 2018 at 10:44am
Well said, Kiwimum! Unlike pandemics, climate change will not go away eventually....it will only worsen with time.

Your "life boat" analogy is a good one. There will still be opportunities for community survival, particularly for water conservation & other infrastructure-based projects, but by and large, it will be every man & woman for themselves.

We may be witnessing the end of the human race, this article discusses the disappearance of insects worldwide...I have also noticed this in the midwestern USA (Great Plains states like Illinois, Minnesota etc.) where bugs do not squash on the wind screen as much as they did 25+ years ago.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html?fbclid=IwAR2jW8di95LLIeOxlnQprs4-htG3LFFIDZ1p11c4LccR4SipbCLl4pzz_Ds

Riis had not been able to stop thinking about the missing bugs. The more he learned, the more his nostalgia gave way to worry. Insects are the vital pollinators and recyclers of ecosystems and the base of food webs everywhere. Riis was not alone in noticing their decline. In the United States, scientists recently found the population of monarch butterflies fell by 90 percent in the last 20 years, a loss of 900 million individuals; the rusty-patched bumblebee, which once lived in 28 states, dropped by 87 percent over the same period. With other, less-studied insect species, one butterfly researcher told me, “all we can do is wave our arms and say, ‘It’s not here anymore!’ ” Still, the most disquieting thing wasn’t the disappearance of certain species of insects; it was the deeper worry, shared by Riis and many others, that a whole insect world might be quietly going missing, a loss of abundance that could alter the planet in unknowable ways. “We notice the losses,” says David Wagner, an entomologist at the University of Connecticut. “It’s the diminishment that we don’t see.”
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 28 2018 at 11:38am
Chuck, every primary school here in NZ grows swan plants and all the children watch Monarch butterflies lay eggs and then the grubs pupate. It's a national thing to do. As for the other bugs, I can't say.

Over here we've been warned we got about 12 more years of temperate climate before we see our summers get very hot and even drier, so this year I've started propagating apple trees. We have 11 acres of very fertile undulating land by the mountains in the South Island with a clay subsoil and when it's dry it's terrible and when it's wet it's like a saturated sponge. My concern is to protect the soil so I intend to shade out all of our land that isn't in a paddock.

I think it will be near impossible to establish trees if the summers are drought stricken like last year's summer and water is restricted. So after some research, I settled on the apple tree as a great deciduous tree that can cope with drought, and wet and cold. I don't want them on dwarfed rootstock, so have been growing them from seed. I currently have 200 little 4 inch tall trees growing in pots and will plant up another 100 today. My plan is that these trees will knot together their canopies, and grow to be huge, will produce apples (most of which will probably be not great but that's fine for the pigs and cows) and we stand the chance of having the occasional delicious new variety.

At the same time it will put all our land in shade for the summer and will open up the soil and improve drainage in the winter. By shading out we will create a more liveable micro climate.

Anyway that's my plan. I should be planting out about 400 trees this autumn and the same number next autumn too. We are also putting in a stand of 100 mixed firewood trees every year.
If it is to be, it is up to me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CRS, DrPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 28 2018 at 3:10pm
Originally posted by KiwiMum KiwiMum wrote:

Chuck, every primary school here in NZ grows swan plants and all the children watch Monarch butterflies lay eggs and then the grubs pupate. It's a national thing to do. As for the other bugs, I can't say.

Over here we've been warned we got about 12 more years of temperate climate before we see our summers get very hot and even drier, so this year I've started propagating apple trees. We have 11 acres of very fertile undulating land by the mountains in the South Island with a clay subsoil and when it's dry it's terrible and when it's wet it's like a saturated sponge. My concern is to protect the soil so I intend to shade out all of our land that isn't in a paddock.

I think it will be near impossible to establish trees if the summers are drought stricken like last year's summer and water is restricted. So after some research, I settled on the apple tree as a great deciduous tree that can cope with drought, and wet and cold. I don't want them on dwarfed rootstock, so have been growing them from seed. I currently have 200 little 4 inch tall trees growing in pots and will plant up another 100 today. My plan is that these trees will knot together their canopies, and grow to be huge, will produce apples (most of which will probably be not great but that's fine for the pigs and cows) and we stand the chance of having the occasional delicious new variety.

At the same time it will put all our land in shade for the summer and will open up the soil and improve drainage in the winter. By shading out we will create a more liveable micro climate.

Anyway that's my plan. I should be planting out about 400 trees this autumn and the same number next autumn too. We are also putting in a stand of 100 mixed firewood trees every year.


You are a remarkable woman, Kiwimum!!   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 01 2018 at 4:48pm
12 Monkeys...............
1995 ‧ Science fiction film/Thriller ‧ 2h 11m a must for AFT
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