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A huge fish die-off in the past week Lake Macatawa

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chargingbear View Drop Down
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    Posted: April 28 2006 at 11:14am



https://http://www.mlive.com/news/grpress/index.ssf?/base/news-7/114597653750510.xml&coll=6

Fish die-off raises stink for lakefront residents

Tuesday, April 25, 2006
By John Tunison
The Grand Rapids Press

HOLLAND -- At Dunton Park, dead and stinking fish line the shoreline.

Across the lake at Kollen Park and along most of Lake Macatawa's edge, the scene is the same as walkers and anglers try to stay upwind of the unsavory catch pushed ashore by the waves.

A huge fish die-off in the past week in Lake Macatawa, a phenomenon the state Department of Natural Resources calls natural, has lakefront homeowners grabbing shovels to bury rotting fish.


Die-offs are not uncommon, but usually involve alewives or other small fish. The fish appearing along Lake Macatawa's shore are large varieties. Most are sheepshead and carp, but with some bass, dog fish, bluegill, walleye and a few muskie.

Some longtime residents are not convinced the die-off is natural.

"I've lived near the lake all my life and have never seen anything like this," said Mike Wiersma, owner of Wiersma's Central Park Foods, 1158 South Shore Drive.

"My dad buried 150 fish in front of his place," he said.

Hope College Professor Graham Peaslee, with the chemistry and geological/environ-mental department, believes a rapid change in water temperature stressed fish trying to recuperate from winter. Fish seek refuge from warmer temperatures at the lake bottom, but the oxygen level there is too low for many species.

"The temperature changes are really indicative of what happened," he said.

His records show the lake temperature was 45 degrees April 10, climbed to 53 degrees April 17 and hit 62 degrees Saturday.

He also said more fish may be dying because there are more in the lake, given that the warm winter left little ice cover and more opportunities for feeding. Recent dredging also could have contributed to the problem by disturbing silt, making the water murky and further lowering oxygen levels near the bottom.

Michigan DNR biologists agreed.

Fish habitat biologist Amy Harrington said she received no reports of pollution releases through the state Department of Environmental Quality.

Some local anglers are not convinced by the explanation, though.

"We're not talking a couple hundred fish, we're talking thousands, and it's not just one species," said Caleb Gritter, a manager with American Tackle Outfitters. "I have no idea what it is, but I don't believe it's from a temperature change."

 
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chargingbear View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chargingbear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 28 2006 at 11:21am


http://www.sltrib.com/utah/ci_3761453
Article Last Updated: 04/28/2006 01:20:31 AM MDT
Parasite may be cause of starfish die-off near Vancouver
The Associated Press


VANCOUVER, British Columbia - Hundreds of starfish have been found dead on a beach on British Columbia's Sunshine Coast, and a scientist says a nonnative parasite is likely to blame and may threaten marine diversity.
   Purple sea stars began washing up last week in Trail Bay at Sechelt, north of Vancouver, and scientists from the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans have been unable to determine why they died, agency spokeswoman Michelle Imbeau said.
   Bruce Leighton, a marine parasite expert at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, noted that the die-off coincided with the peak of the starfish reproductive cycle, when the creatures are most vulnerable to Orchitophryastellarum, a protozoan that feeds on sea stars sperm.
   ''When it invades the gonads, it destroys the whole structure,'' Leighton said Wednesday.
   The parasite is native to the Atlantic but is now also found along the British Columbia and Washington state coast.

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YOU'RE NOT CREDIBLE View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote YOU'RE NOT CREDIBLE Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 12 2017 at 6:23am
WRONG SIDE OF THE WORLD FOR YOUR MAP!!!!!!! SCHOOLS ACTUALLY USE THIS WEBSITE!!! DON'T HARM THE FUTURE OF THE NEXT GENERATION!!!! WHEN IS GERMANY IN MICHIGAN?? AND WHEN IS ZEELAND AN ISLAND?? AND WHEN IS THERE A NORTH SEA NEXT TO HOLLAND?????. You messed up. 
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Technophobe View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 12 2017 at 1:55pm
Two maps!  Holland (Zeeland) is next to North Sea.  Though you are correct to point out that Kolland Park is not Holland, why worry now, when these posts are over a decade old?
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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