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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Now tracking the Aussie Flu.

Antibiotics crackdown must be urgent priority:AMA

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carbon20 View Drop Down
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    Posted: April 16 2017 at 3:05pm

Antibiotics overuse could result in common illness becoming life threatening

By medical reporter Sophie Scott and the National Reporting Team's Meredith Griffiths

Updated about 2 hours ago

Australian health authorities are warning the world faces a post-antibiotic era where simple childhood illnesses could again become deadly.

Key points:

  • Australian health experts "deeply alarmed" by US woman's death from antibiotic-resistant infection
  • Simple childhood diseases could become deadly
  • More action needed to curb antibiotic use in animals and humans

The death of a woman in the United States in January from an infection that could not be treated by any antibiotics has left Australian health experts "deeply alarmed".

In a strongly worded editorial in the Medical Journal of Australia, president of the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, Professor Cheryl Jones, said the woman's death "may herald a post-antibiotic era in which high-level antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is widespread, meaning that common pathogens will be untreatable".

She said if that happened, all areas of healthcare would be affected.

"Simple childhood infections would once again be life-threatening events, major surgery would be associated with high mortality, chemotherapy for cancer and organ transplantation would no longer be possible," she said.

Australia has one of the highest rates of antibiotic use in the world.

Do you know more about this story? Email investigations@abc.net.au

Antibiotics crackdown must be urgent priority: AMA

While the Federal Government has introduced measures to curb the use of antibiotics, experts said more needed to be done to limit the unrestrained use of antibiotics and to monitor superbugs coming into Australia from international travellers or imported food.

"A list of tangible actions against each of the drivers of antimicrobial resistance, co-ordinated across human and animal health and agriculture, must be an urgent priority," Professor Jones said.

The Australian Medical Association has called for the urgent establishment of an Australian National Centre for Disease Control, similar to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with a focus on current and emerging disease threats.

Health experts will gather to discuss antibiotic resistance at a summit in Melbourne on June 29.

What are antibiotics?

  • Antibiotics are a broad class of drugs that work by inhibiting the function of bacterial cells. They do this by killing the bacteria or stopping them from reproducing – but have no effect on viruses.
  • They are used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia or skin infections
  • Before antibiotics were discovered in the 1920s, infections were a common cause of death in people of all ages.
12 Monkeys...............
1995 ‧ Science fiction film/Thriller ‧ 2h 11m a must for AFT
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EdwinSm, View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EdwinSm, Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 16 2017 at 11:32pm
Will a flu pandemic arrive before the antibiotic resistant diseases become a major player in human mortality rates??

Both worry me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2017 at 1:39am
Good luck with that. Quite apart from human over-prescription, they've been an accepted part of farming since the fifties when we first started dosing food animals with antibiotics as growth promoters. It's likely that the majority of all antibiotics used in the US are fed to livestock - and I'm sure the situation is worse in countries like China. The golden age of antibiotics is coming to an end unfortunately.


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"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2017 at 2:21am
i dont worry about any of the worlds problems,to many of them , 

i just like to be aware of all the possibitites that could wipe us out ,

that way i wont be running round like "headless chuck"(chuck =chicken aussie slang)

when the comet,pandemic,Nucular war ,climate change ,car accident,terrorist attack,plane crash

or OLD AGE Wink.......

TAKES ME TO VALHALA.......

LOL lifes to short to worry about it ,it might never happen......

nearly time for BEER O'CLOCK here in OZ

cheers all to a long and happy life Cool
12 Monkeys...............
1995 ‧ Science fiction film/Thriller ‧ 2h 11m a must for AFT
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2017 at 2:28am
be better to have the pandemic first that way the antibiotics will last longer,

especially if its a "SLATE WIPER"Tongue

always look on the bright side of things ,every cloud has a silver lining.....lol
12 Monkeys...............
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EdwinSm, Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2017 at 10:25pm
Originally posted by carbon20 carbon20 wrote:

nearly time for BEER O'CLOCK here in OZ



The following was posted on another forum I am on, complete with notes to explain some of the local trade names and use of English.... Cheers everyone Smile




This morning I was in luck and was able to buy two boxes of "VIC BITTER" (a beer from Melbourne Victoria) cheap at the local bottle o.

I placed the boxes on the front seat and headed back home. I stopped at a service station (gas pump) where a drop-dead gorgeous blonde in a short skirt was filling up her car at the next pump.

She glanced at the two boxes of VB, bent over and leaned in my passenger window, and said in a sexy voice, "I'm a big believer in barter, handsome. Would you be interested in trading sex for beer?" ...

I thought for a few seconds and asked, "What kind of beer 'ya got?"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 18 2017 at 5:39am
lol ,Wink

EdwinSm, spot on Matey
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 18 2017 at 2:42pm
It’s false to believe that antibiotic resistance is only a problem in hospitals – GP surgeries are seeing it too

Authors

Disclosure statement

Christopher Butler receives funding from a range of publicly funded research`granting bodies for his research into antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance. Some of his studies have received unconditional support form industrial partners including Alere and CHR-Hansen. Chris Butler is affiliated with the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences at the University of Oxford.

Oliver van Hecke does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above.

Partners

University of Oxford

University of Oxford provides funding as a member of The Conversation UK.

View all partners

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RepublishRepublish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence.

There are almost weekly alerts of the global threat of antibiotic resistance. They are often abstract and difficult for patients and GPs to relate to. More importantly, they don’t help GPs realise the consequences of needlessly prescribing antibiotics.

Almost 80% of all antibiotics used in human medicine are prescribed by GPs or community nurses for common infections, such as chest, ear, throat, sinus, skin and urinary tract infections. The biggest culprit contributing to antibiotic resistance is that far too many antibiotics are being used for infections that would otherwise have improved on their own.

Deciding which patients will benefit from antibiotics is not always easy, though. When GPs are uncertain, they tend to prescribe antibiotics – just in case. And some patients tend to demand antibiotics for infections where they are not needed.

Although the number of antibiotics prescribed by GPs in England fell from 37.3m in 2014-15 to 34.3m in 2015-16, antibiotic awareness campaigns can do better to reduce antibiotic use. Some people consider the risk of antibiotic resistance to apply to society at large and in the distant future, rather than affecting their own health. And GPs report that they rarely encounter treatment failure because of antibiotic resistance, which suggests that they see antibiotic resistance as being remote from their prescribing decisions.

Number of antibiotics prescribed by GPs in England fell from 37.3m in 2014-15 to 34.3m in 2015-16. Shutterstock/Yada

Our latest study, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, shows that antibiotic resistance has important consequences for patients with common infections managed by GPs. Based on over 5,000 patients from 26 studies, we found patients faring worse because of antibiotic-resistant urinary and respiratory-tract infections that were being treated at GP surgeries, not hospitals. For example, women suffering from the commonest E.coli urinary tract infection, which was resistant to the prescribed antibiotic, had up to four times greater odds of having symptoms for longer than those where the E. coli bacteria responded to the antibiotic. Besides having symptoms for longer, they also had more severe symptoms.

This applies to you … yes, you!

We already know that antibiotic resistance is bad news, but the significance of our finding is new because it challenges the perception by some patients and GPs that antibiotic resistance poses little risk outside of hospitals. Some people think that antibiotic resistance only occurs in people who use antibiotics too often, for too long, or in people with more than one medical conditions. These beliefs are false. Our research looked at common, uncomplicated infections using simple antibiotics and short antibiotic regimes – the sort of infections you might see a GP for – and found that even for these simple infections antibiotic resistance affects your recovery.

Our findings show that the risk of antibiotic resistance has relevance to your own health, here and now. This new evidence has the potential to further improve antibiotic awareness campaigns by influencing our expectations for antibiotics and challenging GPs’ antibiotic prescribing decisions. This may partly explain why awareness campaigns haven’t gone far enough to curb inappropriate antibiotic use.

A better understanding of how antibiotic resistance works should allow more meaningful discussions between patients and their GPs about the risks and benefits of antibiotic treatment for common infections. Putting the effects of antibiotic resistance into context will help change people’s behaviour and preserve the many lifesaving medical procedures where antibiotic use is essential.

12 Monkeys...............
1995 ‧ Science fiction film/Thriller ‧ 2h 11m a must for AFT
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 14 2018 at 1:58pm

New antibiotic family discovered in dirt

  • 13 February 2018

US scientists have discovered a new family of antibiotics in soil samples.

The natural compounds could be used to combat hard-to-treat infections, the team at Rockefeller University hopes.

Tests show the compounds, called malacidins, annihilate several bacterial diseases that have become resistant to most existing antibiotics, including the superbug MRSA.

Experts say the work, published in Nature Microbiology, offers fresh hope in the antibiotics arms race.

Drug-resistant diseases are one of the biggest threats to global health.

They kill around 700,000 people a year, and new treatments are urgently needed.

Drugs from dirt

Soil is teeming with millions of different micro-organisms that produce lots of potentially therapeutic compounds, including new antibiotics.

Dr Sean Brady's team at New York's Rockefeller University has been busy unearthing them.

They used a gene sequencing technique to analyse more than 1,000 soil samples taken from across the US.

When they discovered malacidins in many of the samples, they had a hunch it was an important find.

They tested the compound on rats that they had given MRSA and it eliminated the infection in skin wounds.

The researchers are now working to improve the drug's effectiveness in the hope that it can be developed into a real treatment for people.

Dr Brady said: "It is impossible to say when, or even if, an early stage antibiotic discovery like the malacidins will proceed to the clinic.

"It is a long, arduous road from the initial discovery of an antibiotic to a clinically used entity."

Prof Colin Garner, from Antibiotic Research UK, said finding new antibiotics to treat gram-positive infections like MRSA was good news, but would not address the most pressing need.

"Our concern are the so called gram-negative bacteria which are difficult to treat and where resistance is on the increase," he said.

"Gram-negative bacteria cause pneumonia, blood and urinary tract infections as skin infections. We need new antibiotics to treat this class."


Source and stock photo:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-43032602


Wikipedia already have a detailed article.  Hpefully it is too recent for some helpful soul to have tampered with it yet:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malacidin


Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 14 2018 at 6:11pm
Here we go again...American getting the blame! Go to Europe and you can go to any corner drug store and get antibiotics for any thing you have!!!

Blame Europe!
Always Be Prepared
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2018 at 3:10am
'No point in blaming the sick or the doctors until it is massively reduced in the farming sector - ESPECIALLY IN CHINA.
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2018 at 2:09pm
its to late.............................Cry
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2018 at 3:32pm
I agree, carbon.

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"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EdwinSm, Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2018 at 10:29pm
Quote New antibiotic family discovered in dirt


When working in the garden I love the feel of earth* on my hands...maybe my body is telling me it is good for me....whoever I have not felt the urge to orally ingest it ConfusedDeadThumbs Down



* here British English sounds so much more positive than the American English of "dirt".
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