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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic.

Anyone got statistics

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cobber View Drop Down
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    Posted: February 05 2016 at 4:09am
I've had a look for numbers and stats. Haven't found anything yet, Is anyone on the case yet?
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Albert View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Albert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 05 2016 at 5:09am
Good topic Cobber,  probably a good time to start the charts and projects.  I remember that you did good with that during Ebola.   Wikipedia was great with updating the numbers during Ebola, but the WHO was publishing numbers for that.  Neither the WHO nor CDC are doing that at the moment, from what I can tell. 

 

 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cobber Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 07 2016 at 4:47am
There is something odd about this outbreak. Its seems to have caught everyone on the hop. Maybe everyone was having a rest after Ebola
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Albert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 07 2016 at 6:04am
That and it's moving fast and came out of nowhere.  There were only 147 case in 2014, and shot up to over 1 mill in 2015.   This is truly a mystery disease.    They should have been researching it intensely mid 2015.  Or if they did, they're not disclosing all of their findings.

The biggest problem and what they're trying to avoid is travel restrictions as what we saw with Ebola when airlines started doing their own.  I believe the WHO and CDC will try to avoid that at all costs, especially with the Olympics coming up.  It all comes down to money and economics over human life.   I will also add if the airlines didn't do their own flight restrictions, Ebola would have spread a little further and put like a risk for some.   The WHO did not want those restrictions.

Like I said, if the Olympics results in just 1 case of Microcephaly with a baby, that is unacceptable.   The Olympics is not worth any one life.   Olympics is judgment day.   If they go on with the games and risk human life, that is liable to send the Man Upstairs off a cliff.   

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 07 2016 at 6:16am
Zika snuck under the radar.  Many of the problems it caused were not attributed to it, until huge numbers of cases made the connections more obvious.  

Who could be bothered to watch a mild virus which has no dangerous symptoms whilst there are so many real nasties to watch?  Manpower is always insufficient to any medical task.

Now we can all see its hidden horrors (unless there are more nasty surprises up Zika's grubby sleeve) we are throwing manhours at it in spades.  We (or rather the scientists, epidemiologists, coordinators and drug companies) have some catching up to do!  Perhaps there is a lesson for us all, including us here at AFT, lurking in the horrors of this and Ebola.  Though you have to look left for oncoming traffic, there can also be one way streets, idiot or foreign drivers and blind wanderers in the wrong place.  The big killer is most likely to be a form of the flu.  But it is not guaranteed to be so.  A strange unexpected bug may emerge from left field (oncoming traffic from the right) and take the unwary by surprise.  We have to watch the little ones too.
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 07 2016 at 12:22pm
Yeesss, Techno Thumbs Up
I firmly believe that the "Big One" will hit us with little or no warning. As good as we are at tracking outbreaks these days, modern population densities and travel will have a bug around the globe far faster than our ability to see it coming. Most people won't begin to prepare until it's far too late. A novel flu virus exploding out of China, or some previously unknown disease uncovered deep in the jungle by logging crews or bush meat hunters should be what we're looking for. And we should already be prepped for it, because after the fact is not an option.


"Buy it cheap. Stack it deep"
"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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