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Commercial Turkey Flock in California HPAI

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newbie1 View Drop Down
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    Posted: January 24 2015 at 8:12pm
http://fox40.com/2015/01/24/avian-flu-confirmed-in-california-turkey-flock-not-a-public-health-concern/


Avian Flu Confirmed in California Turkey Flock, Not a Public Health Concern

Posted 5:16 PM, January 24, 2015, by AP Wire, Updated at 05:15pm, January 24, 2015     

STANISLAUS COUNTY (AP) _ Federal agriculture officials say they have found avian influenza in a commercial turkey flock in central California.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Saturday that the facility in Stanislaus County has been quarantined and birds from the affected flock will not enter the food system.

Testing occurred after the flock experienced a spike in deaths.

Officials say there is no immediate public health concern and the detected strain _ H5N8 _ is not known to harm humans.

The bird flu strain H5N1 ravaged poultry across Asia in 2003 and is more easily spread among humans.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote newbie1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 24 2015 at 8:14pm
Here is a better write up on it from the USDA

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/aphis/newsroom/news/sa_news/sa_by_date/sa_2015/sa_01/ct_hpai_california/!ut/p/a0/04_Sj9CPykssy0xPLMnMz0vMAfGjzOK9_D2MDJ0MjDzdXUyMDTzdPA2cAtz8jT1dTPULsh0VAbiDHEw!/

Highly Pathogenic H5N8 Avian Influenza Confirmed in Commercial Turkey Flock in California


Last Modified: Jan 24, 2015

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No immediate public health concern; detected strain is not known to harm humans

Contacts:
Joelle Hayden (301) 851-4040
joelle.r.hayden@aphis.usda.gov
Ed Curlett (301) 851-4052
ed.c.curlett@aphis.usda.gov

WASHINGTON, Jan. 24, 2015— The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic (HPAI) H5N8 avian influenza in a commercial turkey flock in Stanislaus County, California. This is the first finding of HPAI in commercial poultry during the ongoing disease incident in the Pacific Flyway. No human cases of these avian influenza viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada, or internationally, and there continues to be no public health concern.

Samples from the flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the California Animal Health & Food Safety Laboratory System (CAHFS) and the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding. APHIS is partnering closely with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), which has quarantined the facility. APHIS and CDFA have initiated an incident command response, and APHIS will assist CDFA in depopulating the remaining birds on the property to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the involved flock will not enter the food system.

H5N8 has not been shown to present a health risk to the public. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in the nearby area, following existing avian influenza response plans. These plans also will include preventing the movement of risky animals or products out of the immediate area to prevent further disease spread. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets, and in migratory wild bird populations.

USDA will be notifying the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) of this detection as part of USDA’s ongoing reporting of all HPAI findings. USDA also continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts. OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and to report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov

Additional background:

Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese, and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)—the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.

The H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In the Pacific flyway, the H5N8 virus has mixed with North American avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. These mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

USDA has identified two mixed-origin viruses in the Pacific Flyway: the H5N2 virus and new H5N1 virus. The new H5N1 virus is not the same virus as the H5N1 virus found in Asia, Europe and Africa that has caused some human illness. Detailed analysis of the virus is underway in cooperation with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. None of these viruses have been identified in humans, nor are expected to pose a public health risk.

For more information about the ongoing avian influenza disease incident in the Pacific Flyway visit the APHIS website. More information about avian influenza can be found on the USDA avian influenza page.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hachiban08 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 24 2015 at 9:07pm
Thanks for the extra posts on it, Newbie. I had posted it earlier in the Avian Flu section, but I think it didn't get much foot traffic lol That is my home county.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CRS, DrPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 25 2015 at 11:59am
Originally posted by newbie1 newbie1 wrote:

http://fox40.com/2015/01/24/avian-flu-confirmed-in-california-turkey-flock-not-a-public-health-concern/


Avian Flu Confirmed in California Turkey Flock, Not a Public Health Concern

Posted 5:16 PM, January 24, 2015, by AP Wire, Updated at 05:15pm, January 24, 2015     

STANISLAUS COUNTY (AP) _ Federal agriculture officials say they have found avian influenza in a commercial turkey flock in central California.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Saturday that the facility in Stanislaus County has been quarantined and birds from the affected flock will not enter the food system.

Testing occurred after the flock experienced a spike in deaths.

Officials say there is no immediate public health concern and the detected strain _ H5N8 _ is not known to harm humans.

The bird flu strain H5N1 ravaged poultry across Asia in 2003 and is more easily spread among humans.

Great post!  Sorry, I've been busy, let me take this further: 

The H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In the Pacific flyway, the H5N8 virus has mixed with North American avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. These mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

The Asian countries (China, Southeast Asia etc.) are struggling to provide enough meat on the dining table for over 2 billion people, so they are pushing their agribusiness model to the breaking point.  This means taking shortcuts in biosecurity (massive flocks outdoors), feeding waste products back to livestock (raw poultry mortalities fed to pigs) etc.  

Couple this huge industry with the fact that many birds in the Asian continent routinely carry a mix of avian flu and we have one big honkin' influenza engine!!  Wild birds pick up reasserted virus from domestic birds and vice-versa (they use the same ponds and lakes).  Then, as wild birds migrate, they drag the viruses along the way and infect new hosts. 

I first learned about this in the 1970s, when Asian ag was much less sophisticated = a farm family with a pig and a few ducks/chickens, often sleeping together in the house to keep warm in the winter!!  

It is inevitable that we will see this type of event in the USA, this was from Shanghai a few years ago.  I've never heard a believable explanation for this die off. 


Also, I take exception to the line that H5N8 has not caused harm to humans.  We seem to be susceptible to all of the avian influenza viruses if the conditions are right (infectious dose, exposure to poultry, deep lung inhalation etc.).

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 25 2015 at 11:08pm
Great post - as always, Chuck Thumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Albert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 26 2015 at 2:56am

Bird flu found at Foster Farms turkey ranch in California

LIVINGSTON, Calif. --
Hundreds of turkeys at a Central California ranch are being killed to prevent the spread of a type of avian flu that is not a threat to people but can decimate poultry flocks.

Foster Farms announced on Saturday that routine food safety screening uncovered the flu outbreak at the Stanislaus County ranch, which was quarantined in keeping with U.S. Department of Agriculture policies.

The Modesto Bee reports that federal agriculture officials identified the strain of bird flu virus as H5N8, which health experts says carries almost no health risk for humans.

The same strain infected a backyard flock of chickens and guinea fowl in Southern Oregon last month.

Another type of bird flu, H5N1, can infect humans although it is not easily spread.

Foster Farms says no turkey products have been affected by the outbreak.
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http://abc7news.com/business/bird-flu-found-at-foster-farms-turkey-ranch-in-california/490443/
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