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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic.

COMMUNICATION ISSUES

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 19 2006 at 9:05pm
 I am planning to add a bc246t to my preps.I am a rank novice to scanning, could someone advise me as to what type of antenne I could buy to improve reception.Thank you in advance.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 2ifbyC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 20 2006 at 8:49am
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 20 2006 at 10:42am
Thank you 2ifbyC.I'll definately check it out after I get my radio.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rocky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2006 at 3:40pm
In answer to some questions:

Solar/Handcrank Radios by Freeplay (The Summit) $43.50
Weather Alert Portable Radios by Oregon Scientific $34.50
           (includes emer. alerts stations as well as NOAH)
2-Way Radios by Motorola-FRS/GMRS (12 mile radius) $65.50
Radios and Flashlights

Hand Crank Cell Phone Charger (The Sidewinder) $22.50
Survival Tools

Why go all around town and spend hours searching the internet?
Start here for top quality and low prices. Look through our entire website....if you need it,
we probably have it.

We started our company after a detailed investigation of family emergency preparation items for our use. We may not be the biggest, but chances are we are the best!
                    
                                    Home Emergency USA.com

Hope to see you there. Just email me or give me a call if you need special help, have questions, etc. Contact info on our website.

I have been an Avia Flu Talk member for quite a while. My family and I value so much all the information we have gotten from this website.
Thank you, one and all.

Rocky
Prepare for the Unexpected!
Rocky
http://www.homeemergencyusa.com
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jazzy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 27 2006 at 9:06pm
rocky,

i have wanted a volcano stove for some time--after i saw your post i did a search and you have a terrific price for the stove and accessories---ordered one today.  i have a solar oven that i love using and a reagular camping propane stove, but im really glad to find the volcano II becasue it is more versital than just he propane stove.

thanks
jazzy
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Courage is Fear that has said its prayers

Jazzy Acre Herbals
http://jazzyherbals.xeir.com/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 28 2006 at 4:17am

I looked at that SOS Charger. Looks like a nice unit, but my phone is old enough to where it ain't supported. Oh well.

Question on the radio issue: Someone mentioned a 100' mast. I'm assuming that refers to the antenna? Ok, I live real close to an airport. 1.5 to 2 miles from the runway. My house is on the takeoff/approach path.  What are the height regulations concerning maximum mast height? I'd hate to make an investment only to have some 'official' tell me the mast is too high?
 
Any idea where i can find the info?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rocky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 29 2006 at 2:58pm
Hi,
Not sure if by 'SOS' you mean a brand name (I don't know it) or "emergency". For the Sidewinder hand crank charger that we carry, we have a complete list of phones compatible using one of the included adapters.

Adapters for other cell phones not included in this list are available for $5.00 including shipping. We can email you that list, or you can email us the make and model you have.(see email on site)

As for the question below, height restriction above roofline is probably covered by local ordinance, or maybe county. Any licensed builder would probably know, otherwise contact would be with local, township, or county building office.


Originally posted by FictionWriter FictionWriter wrote:

I looked at that SOS Charger. Looks like a nice unit, but my phone is old enough to where it ain't supported. Oh well.


Question on the radio issue: Someone mentioned a 100' mast. I'm assuming that refers to the antenna? Ok, I live real close to an airport. 1.5 to 2 miles from the runway. My house is on the takeoff/approach path.  What are the height regulations concerning maximum mast height? I'd hate to make an investment only to have some 'official' tell me the mast is too high?

 

Any idea where i can find the info?


    
Prepare for the Unexpected!
Rocky
http://www.homeemergencyusa.com
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 30 2006 at 5:31am
SOSCharger is a brand name. Looks pretty much identical to the handcrank sidewinder unit on your page though.
 
Either way, the gist is the same. Your page says compatible with most popular models. Motorola is on that list, but my phone is 6 or 7 yrs old. One of the 1st digital Startacs to come out.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Peteski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 27 2006 at 8:08am
I read with interest your comments about getting an FCC license and operating modified CBs in the 10 meter band.   I am an extra class amatuer (ham) radio operator (KF0GV).   First, do not buy a CB that has been modified to operate on the 10 meter band.   10 meters is not only considered a ham band, IT IS an amatuer band.   Operating on 10 meters with a modified CB or with an FCC type accepted ham radio without an FCC license is illegal.    The FCC has really been stepping up enforcement lately and the fines can be in the $5,000 to $10,000 range.   So, to everyone out there - Don't do it.   You are not welcome on 10 meters unless you are properly licensed and have the proper equipment.   Having said that, it is not at all difficult to obtain your license to operate on the 10 meter band or on any of the lower HF bands.   10 meters is considered a relatively high frequency HF band and is not very reliable for long distance communication (DX) unless you are near or in the solar maximum of the 11 year cycle.   Right now, we are at the bottom and DX communication on 10 meters is almost non-existant except for some infrequent sporatic E communication which usually is short lived and only United States wide or at most to northern South America.    The FCC just passed a new regulation that eliminates the morse code requirement entirely.   I believe that will go in to effect on or about February 1, 2007.   So, now, you don't even have to learn the code to get your FCC license to operate on the ham bands.   There still are various levels of licenses which I think will be Technician, General and Extra.   Each test covers more detailed and difficult information and therefore requires more study to get to a higher level.   My recommendation is to study for and take the tech. and general class exams and get your license.    Then you will have ample frequency priviledges.   Take your extra class license exam later if you are in the hobby to stay.   If you get your General class license, you will be able to operate on all of the other HF bands including 15, 20, 40, 80 and 160 meters.   20 and 40 provide reliable world wide communication year round and throughout the highs and lows of the 11 year solar cycle.   We welcome new hams and are eager to help.   If anyone has any questions about becoming a Ham Radio Operator, I'd recommend contacting the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) at www.arrl.org and someone can help you there.   Or contact someone in your local area.   The ARRL can refer you to local Ham radio clubs.    Good luck!
Pete
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 08 2009 at 1:51am
Originally posted by Spoon Spoon wrote:

Hi MM,

Bannor and I just recently set up VHF transceivers (2-meter HAM) on both ends... it works.  We can communicate no matter what happens.  We can also here a lot of what's happening in our area.

If you're interested, I or Bannor can give more detailed instructions.  Each setup ran about $500 (radio, AC power supply, 100' cable, antenna and mount).

You should get a license.  Not that difficult.  We're in the process but wanted to set up the radios first to make sure we could communicate.  For now we just listen... soon we will be able transmit legally.



Tell Bannor we have been working on this for two years. This is a very sophisticated system and I have 5-6 programmers in Silicon Valley working with our "Defense company" on this. The layers of encryption as well as compress for which we have written highly advanced socket code working with programmers from Thailand goes far beyond a simple local broadcasting network. We must be able to communicate with U.K. and Europe.

I first posted concerning INet 3years ago. As with all good ideas, it has made the rounds. The challenge for those of use who have been programmers since 1978 in Silicon Valley, my true home- is in the new technology we are developing.

This information is being released several weeks prior to the manual. There is no way that what we are doing can be developed this fast and compete with our system.

Although submitted to .gov and scheduled for demonstration when we can to DHS - also offered to set up a "write you own project' there are many political considerations.

There are many island groups working on Prep- however even though they interface across states, interfacing with the infrastructure is important. That we are doing currently in an unofficial capacity.

Medclinician
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote edprof Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 21 2016 at 8:31pm
Originally posted by Trident/Delta Trident/Delta wrote:

Couple quick things - The morse code requirement for hams is no longer in effect. Just a written test on radio theory, electronic principals and station safety.
I am a General class Ham. I still use morse because it is much more reliable than voice. I guess that I have been appointed the un-official-official radio geek.  If you have any questions feel free to ask


I'm a new General class.  Right, no Morse anymore.  I went from non-ham to Ham with a General and four radios in about two months.  2 meter radio in the cellar, CB in the same storm cellar, a hand 2 meter-70cm, and I am getting an HF radio for Christmas. More coming in another post.
Oftentimes the Lord helps those who help themselves.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote edprof Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 21 2016 at 8:38pm
Originally posted by Peteski Peteski wrote:

I read with interest your comments about getting an FCC license and operating modified CBs in the 10 meter band.   I am an extra class amatuer (ham) radio operator (KF0GV).   First, do not buy a CB that has been modified to operate on the 10 meter band.   10 meters is not only considered a ham band, IT IS an amatuer band.   Operating on 10 meters with a modified CB or with an FCC type accepted ham radio without an FCC license is illegal.    The FCC has really been stepping up enforcement lately and the fines can be in the $5,000 to $10,000 range.   So, to everyone out there - Don't do it.   You are not welcome on 10 meters unless you are properly licensed and have the proper equipment.   Having said that, it is not at all difficult to obtain your license to operate on the 10 meter band or on any of the lower HF bands.   10 meters is considered a relatively high frequency HF band and is not very reliable for long distance communication (DX) unless you are near or in the solar maximum of the 11 year cycle.   Right now, we are at the bottom and DX communication on 10 meters is almost non-existant except for some infrequent sporatic E communication which usually is short lived and only United States wide or at most to northern South America.    The FCC just passed a new regulation that eliminates the morse code requirement entirely.   I believe that will go in to effect on or about February 1, 2007.   So, now, you don't even have to learn the code to get your FCC license to operate on the ham bands.   There still are various levels of licenses which I think will be Technician, General and Extra.   Each test covers more detailed and difficult information and therefore requires more study to get to a higher level.   My recommendation is to study for and take the tech. and general class exams and get your license.    Then you will have ample frequency priviledges.   Take your extra class license exam later if you are in the hobby to stay.   If you get your General class license, you will be able to operate on all of the other HF bands including 15, 20, 40, 80 and 160 meters.   20 and 40 provide reliable world wide communication year round and throughout the highs and lows of the 11 year solar cycle.   We welcome new hams and are eager to help.   If anyone has any questions about becoming a Ham Radio Operator, I'd recommend contacting the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) at www.arrl.org and someone can help you there.   Or contact someone in your local area.   The ARRL can refer you to local Ham radio clubs.    Good luck!


Let me echo what this ham said. 

CB is not ham.  I have both and use both, but they are different frequencies, different legal entities, and different cultures.  Someone from CB land who wanders into the ham frequencies will be noticed very quickly.  They might even get "fox hunted" and turned in if the situation doesn't justify it.

FCC enforcement seems to this relatively new ham to be occasional but severe when it does happen.  Study for an exam, get at least your Technician's license.  Even without a background in physics or electrical engineering (like me) you can learn enough from ten hours study and two-three visits with someone already inside the ham community, and you can pass your technician's exam.  This will get you into two-meter and 70 centimeter privileges.  This is 45-50 mile radius reach in most geographies even without hitting a repeater.


Oftentimes the Lord helps those who help themselves.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote edprof Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 21 2016 at 8:51pm
I'll try not to write an epistle, but hopefully write enough to be of help.  Two months ago I became aware that no one in our church had any ham radio capabilities.  If we lost the Internet and/or the grid, we would be out of touch with the world.  I decided to get into ham and buy a CB radio.  With the help of a very experienced "Elmer" I installed those two radios in a concrete storm shelter, powered by a deep cycle 12 volt battery.  My plan is to recharge the battery at least once per month if not sooner.  I have some other preps I do catch-up work on around the first of each month any way.

I frankly under-prepared for my Technician exam.  I passed but without a lot of room to spare.  The passing grade did let me get on the air and begin getting some hands on experience.  There's nothing about the FCC rules that says that a Technician is going to have about a 50 mile radius range, but when you get into what frequencies that license grants you, that is about the way it works out.  So our goal of having someone in the church who can gain information from the world and pass it on locally was not yet met.  I got a General book and began studying for that license; the time was right for me to buy a new HF transceiver and peripherals, so I did.  Those will be under the tree for me this Christmas.  I spent at least 25 hours preparing for the General exam and made an 89. (I'm a former college prof; I'm used to being a student.  I STILL had to study for this one.)

So now we will have someone in our church who can put an ear to the ground to gain information even if most other forms of communication are down.  Both the HF and the two-meter radios are 12 volt battery supplied, so that deals with some grid issues.  We have 6000 watts of solar panels, battery bank, Generac propane powered 11kW generator, and gasoline powered generator, so we think we will have electricity under most circumstances.  It'd be nice if Kim Jon Un would give us a couple of hour's notice before he send an HEMP over this way so we could turn everything off/disconnect everything.  With information gleaned from HF and VHF, we can then use the CB to relay information along to our church and others who may be listening in.

 
Oftentimes the Lord helps those who help themselves.
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