Click to Translate to English Click to Translate to French  Click to Translate to Spanish  Click to Translate to German  Click to Translate to Italian  Click to Translate to Japanese  Click to Translate to Chinese Simplified  Click to Translate to Korean  Click to Translate to Arabic  Click to Translate to Russian  Click to Translate to Portuguese


Forum Home Forum Home > General Discussion > Latest News
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - FINLAND:Hundreds of dead birds
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

FINLAND:Hundreds of dead birds

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
trish View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: February 08 2006
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote trish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: FINLAND:Hundreds of dead birds
    Posted: May 09 2006 at 7:37am
http://www.hs.fi/english/article/Hundreds+of+dead+birds+cause+consternation+in+Turku+Archipelago/1135219822281

Hundreds of dead birds cause consternation in Turku Archipelago

Mostly pigeons and lapwings; cause of death as yet unclear


Hundreds of dead birds cause consternation in Turku Archipelago
Hundreds of dead birds cause consternation in Turku Archipelago
Hundreds of dead birds cause consternation in Turku Archipelago
Hundreds of dead birds cause consternation in Turku Archipelago
 print this
Hundreds of dead birds have turned up on the small island of Jurmo, in the outer reaches of the Turku Archipelago.
      The dead birds, which are predominantly wood pigeons and lapwings, began appearing around Easter. Also among the dead are around two dozen swans, but no other water birds appear to be affected, according to islanders.
      The deaths are unprecedented, according to islanders, but as yet there is no certainty over the cause of the birds' demise: none of the dead birds have been taken to the mainland for analysis.
     
The islanders have collected dozens of dead birds from their yards and gardens and have either incinerated them or buried them.
      Thus far the corpses have not been sent anywhere for analysis, since the postal service has refused to accept them and the locals have had no opportunity to have them sent by courier for examination on the mainland.
      Naturally, in a climate where avian influenza remains a hot topic, in spite of a lack of previous evidence that it has made landfall in Finland, the local population would very much like to know what it is that has caused the mass deaths of these birds.
      It is quite possible that the birds have succumbed to something quite other than avian flu. According to statements from islanders, the birds were so weak prior to their deaths that they were unable to fly, and simply ran away from people as best they could.
     
The first bodies began to appear around Easter, and in the last week or so no new carcasses have been found.
      Many of the dead birds are nevertheless still to be seen where they died, including a large swan that is visible close to the guest harbour on the remote little island (see map).
      Pirjo Mattsson says she has lived on Jurmo for 27 years but has never seen anything like this before. She claims to have counted 32 dead pigeons and lapwings already before Easter.
      Björn Lindström, another resident, says he has incinerated 49 birds. He also offered a figure of 25 for the number of dead swans. The regional veterinary officer was supposed to come to inspect the dead birds, but could not get to the island because of the difficult spring ice conditions.
      On Monday, Pauli Kuoppamäki collected two fresh pigeon carcasses with a view to taking them for analysis. Kuoppamäki said he would be taking them directly to the Finnish Food Safety Authority EVIRA for study. He expressed annoyance with the apparent indifference of the authorities to the matter.
      According to the regional veterinary officer Tapio Manninen, the Finnish authorities are aware of the deaths of the pigeons and lapwings, but the news of the swans came as a surprise. Manninen believes the cause of death of the smaller birds is more likely to have been extreme cold earlier in the spring - when there were a number of very sharp night-frosts. Such deaths are by no means unheard of at this time of year.


Previously in HS International Edition:
  No avian influenza found among migrating birds yet in Finland (3.5.2006)
  Finns satisfied with preparations taken by officials for bird flu (4.4.2006)

Links:
  EVIRA, Finnish Food Safety Authority
  Turku Archipelago
Back to Top
Commonground View Drop Down
Advisor Group
Advisor Group


Joined: March 06 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Commonground Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 7:56am
This is what drives me crazy. This is a quote from the above article.....yet, look at the guy in the moon suit picking up the birds!!!   ABBF and the suit.
"Manninen believes the cause of death of the smaller birds is more likely to have been extreme cold earlier in the spring - when there were a number of very sharp night-frosts. Such deaths are by no means unheard of at this time of year."
Back to Top
Gimme View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: March 19 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 428
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gimme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 8:07am
Originally posted by Commonground Commonground wrote:

This is what drives me crazy. This is a quote from the above article.....yet, look at the guy in the moon suit picking up the birds!!!   ABBF and the suit.
"Manninen believes the cause of death of the smaller birds is more likely to have been extreme cold earlier in the spring - when there were a number of very sharp night-frosts. Such deaths are by no means unheard of at this time of year."
 
Yeah, me too, drives me nuts.  UNLESS this is a common occurence found numerous times in prior years.  Can't you just imagine it, [hey dudes, we got a serious problem here...call Chicken Council for official statement] ABBF
 
 
 
 
Back to Top
Jhetta View Drop Down
Senior Advisor Group
Senior Advisor Group
Avatar

Joined: March 28 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 1272
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jhetta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 8:54am
Basically we need to find out how to address the situation ourselves and force our local governments to act responsibly.
 
Has anyone heard from Cathy Dean... she did a very good job with this?
 
This is a test the poultry industry uses... at the very least these remote areas should use this technology.
 
The IDEXX FlockCheck Avian Influenza Test Kit is USDA licensed
 
Validation for the following subypes:
H5N1, H5N2, H5N3, H7N1, H7N2, H7N3, H9N2, N3N8, H1N7, etc.
 
 
 
 
Back to Top
oknut View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: March 04 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 847
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oknut Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 8:59am
I just checked the memberlist and it looks like she hasn't posted anything since March 30th, but was logged on last on April 29th.

At least she is still visiting the forum.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 9:35am
Hummm, Test?
They don't Test!
Why Test for H5N1?
Test? What good would it do?
If they tested, they could find it!
Don't want to do that now, do they?
Might get the ignorant public all in a wild tither.
Then you have unrest and civil disturbance and casualties.
Best to keep the public totally ignorant and placated to preserve society.
Back to Top
Jhetta View Drop Down
Senior Advisor Group
Senior Advisor Group
Avatar

Joined: March 28 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 1272
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jhetta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 9:42am
And It might impact business and you could be held accountable for not protecting the public!
 
Originally posted by JoeNeubarth JoeNeubarth wrote:

Hummm, Test?
They don't Test!
Why Test for H5N1?
Test? What good would it do?
If they tested, they could find it!
Don't want to do that now, do they?
Might get the ignorant public all in a wild tither.
Then you have unrest and civil disturbance and casualties.
Best to keep the public totally ignorant and placated to preserve society.
Back to Top
wannago View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 252
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wannago Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 8:56pm
The three wise monkeys

See no evil
Hear no evil
Speak no evil

OR just plain old Deaf, Dumb and Blind

Duh
wannago
Back to Top
Raven View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: March 30 2006
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 48
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Raven Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 10:14pm
Maybe we should also put pressure on the Newspapers to do something...If they could have got to a tiny remote island to interview people they could have added to the public service of taking some samples out.  Its like all the reporting of disasters, flying in helicopters so they can make money and not helping those in need ("Thats not our job") 

While BF is very serious, there are always deaths of birds in early spring, and especially this year the cold weather continued much later than it normally does (although to make up for it it seems to have skipped spring and jsut went to summer)


Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2006 at 10:17pm
Exactly what I was thinking when I read this.  "Sorry, can't make it today.  Too much spring ice.  Ran out of test tubes.  Gotta take my shirts to the cleaners." 
Back to Top
Raven View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: March 30 2006
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 48
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Raven Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 10 2006 at 1:58am
Originally posted by gettingready gettingready wrote:

Exactly what I was thinking when I read this.  "Sorry, can't make it today.  Too much spring ice.....  " 


I suppose that we should have expected him to risk a 40 km trip in spring ice (and open water), then we would have our first death due to BF in Finland.  Cry


Back to Top
trish View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: February 08 2006
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote trish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 10 2006 at 9:02am

UPDATE from Finland:

 

Ministry was unaware of bird deaths

All bird carcasses found on island will be examined


Ministry was unaware of bird deaths
 print this
The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry did not hear about the large number of dead birds found on the island of Jurmo, in the municipality of Korpo in the Turku Archipelago, until yesterday. According to the islanders, hundreds of wood pigeons and lapwings have been found dead on Jurmo in the course of this spring.
      "Only on Tuesday morning did we receive samples of the dead birds found in Jurmo. They will all be examined. I thank the person who provided us with the specimens", comments Matti Aho, head of the Department of Food and Health at the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.
      According to Aho, the likelihood of a bird flu epidemic in the area diminishes day by day, especially because migration of the aquatic birds has already finished for the most part.
      "Still, we are interested in finding out about mass deaths of birds, such as in Jurmo, so that we might be better prepared to protect the poultry in the area."
      A private sample collector provided the ministry with the samples. Residents of the island regard the mass deaths of the birds as exceptional. The regional veterinary officer Tapio Manninen, in turn, says that based on the information he has received from birdwatchers there is nothing particularly unusual about the deaths.
     
According to Aho, it is sometimes difficult for the authorities to decide whom to listen to. "In this case, the opinions of the residents of Jurmo and the bird enthusiasts seem to be quite different."
      The administrator of the Jurmo bird station Juha Kylänpää explains that he first heard of the deaths several days after Easter from a member of Tringa, the Birding Society of the Helsinki Area, who called him and reported on a few dozen dead wood pigeons found on the island.
     
The station operators first contacted the regional veterinary officer, who affirmed that the birds had been dead for too long for sample-collecting purposes.
      "After that none of the people manning the station have received any new information of exceptional bird deaths", Kylänpää explains.
     
According to Aho, until now the greatest interest has centred on waterfowl.
      "The international perception has been that the avian flu virus is found in ducks in particular. Only the most recent developments affirm that birds of prey may also carry the virus."
      "As far as we know, there have not been significant findings of the virus in wood pigeons and lapwings anywhere. Of regular poultry, we know that the turkey is particularly sensitive to the virus", Aho notes.


Previously in HS International Edition:
  Hundreds of dead birds cause consternation in Turku Archipelago (9.5.2006)

Links:
  Municipality of Korpo
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 11 2006 at 4:52pm

I guess this is no suprise...


Dead birds in Turku archipelago did not fall victim to avian flu

More dead wood pigeons found on Jurmo island


The wood pigeons and the other small birds found dead on the island of Jurmo, in the Turku Archipelago, did not die of avian flu, the Finnish Food Safety Authority EVIRA established after laboratory tests were carried out on Wednesday.
     
Professor Liisa Sihvonen, head of Virology Department at EVIRA, explains that the preliminary results were obtained quickly by using a new molecular method.

      "Had there been any ambiguity to the findings, we would have carried out further testing, but since the result was immediately negative, and there was nothing vague or unclear about it, we will not pursue with additional tests at this stage."

      According to Sihvonen, the test proves that the bird carcasses found on Jurmo do not contain the H5N1-type avian flu virus.
      The Virology Department only tested the birds for viral infections.
     
"To establish the birds' actual cause of death, the carcasses should be forwarded to EVIRA's regional unit in Oulu", Sihvonen adds.

      "If one wanted to isolate the virus in anticipation of the avian flu, it would be best to deliver the bird carcass to our laboratory without delay. Otherwise, though the presence of the virus can still be verified, the virus itself may die before it is isolated", Sihvonen explains.

      "Once the virus has been confirmed through the molecular method, we begin to isolate it. This phase may take a few weeks."

      "This is why it used to take a long time before any test results could be confirmed", Sihvonen notes.
     
In the meantime, more dead wood pigeons have been found on the island of Jurmo.

      A local resident Björn Lindström says he found five more dead wood pigeons in the vicinity of his home on Tuesday and Wednesday, even without particularly looking for them.

      On Tuesday, Lindström and representatives of the Southwestern Archipelago National Park visited some of the bare islets south of Jurmo. They were astonished to find dead wood pigeons there as well.

      "It was very peculiar, for I have never seen or heard of anything like this before", Lindström ponders.

http://www.hs.fi/english/article/Dead+birds+in+Turku+archipelago+did+not+fall+victim+to+avian+flu/1135219849367


Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Quick Reply
Name:

Message:
   NoFollow is applied to all links from this forum
 Enable BBcodes

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down