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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

Global Warming Not The Problem!

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FluMom View Drop Down
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    Posted: February 18 2019 at 4:46pm
The sixth mass extinction, explained
he populations of the world's wild animals have fallen by more than 50 percent and humanity is to blame. Here's everything you need to know:
What's gone wrong?
As the human population has swelled to 7.5 billion, our species' massive footprint on planet Earth has had a devastating impact on mammals, birds, reptiles, insects, and marine life. We've driven thousands of species to the edge of extinction through habitat loss, overhunting and overfishing, the introduction of invasive species into new ecosystems, toxic pollution, and climate change. In the past 40 years, the number of wild animals has plunged 50 percent, a 2014 study found. And the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) estimates that populations of vertebrates — higher animals with spinal columns — have fallen by an average of 60 percent since 1970. The past 20 years have brought a 90 percent plunge in the number of monarch butterflies in America, a loss of 900 million, and an 87 percent loss of rusty-patched bumblebees. Only 3 percent of the original populations of the heavily fished Pacific bluefin tuna remain in the sea. "We are sleepwalking toward the edge of a cliff," said Mike Barrett, executive director at WWF.


You guys are worried about Global Warming which is caused also by overpopulation but people are killing off the planet because there are too many of us. Just a fact, if we could kill off 1/4 to 1/2 of the people on earth we would heal the planet.   You guys need to quit bitching about the U.S. and global warming. It will do no good even if we all quit driving, quit flying, all turn vegi eaters which is never going to happen there are just too many people we are killing the earth.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 18 2019 at 9:28pm
Yep.....

Humans are killing the planet.....

Not Yanks,Aussies,Brits,Japs,

All of us.....

We in it together......
12 Monkeys...............
1995 ‧ Science fiction film/Thriller ‧ 2h 11m a must for AFT
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 19 2019 at 1:51am
No arguments from me either.

Far too many of us!
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 24 2019 at 10:44am
Absolutely - it is a global problem, and no one nation is 100% to blame. Overpopulation is definitely the elephant in the room that nobody wants to discuss because it's going to be a difficult one to deal with. China discovered this with their "one child policy" - they ended up with a large elderly population with fewer young people to support it. Nature takes care of that problem much more indiscriminately, and we may have that to look forward to if we don't tackle it. The truth of the matter is that it's a problem that will eventually fix itself, one way or another. Food/water shortages, disease, pollution - they're all waiting to do the job for us if we don't take action.

Third world countries now look at us and want to adopt our damaging first world lifestyle and diet, and that will be the final nail in the coffin if it happens. We have to use our enormous resources to develop ways to have clean and affordable housing, transportation and abundant food without the consequences to the environment our current way of life brings about. We need to lead by example, and unfortunately we've decided to turn inward and pretend it's someone else's concern. The problem with that line of thinking is that our climate sees no borders. It took us a long time to figure out that non-smoking sections on passenger planes didn't work - now we have to recognize the same thing happens on a global scale too.

The issue is that far too many of the people that could actually make a difference refuse to acknowledge that we're all peeing in the same tiny, crowded goldfish bowl, and it's a lot smaller than we imagine. We can argue about it all we like, but the planet is already changing rapidly enough to see, and our inaction will doom future generations. How many of us remember the seasons being very different when we were kids? We're in a period where corporations are able to wield enough power to have talking heads (politicians and pseudo-scientists) in the right places saying the right things to further their agenda. Case in point - the current crop of paid shills that promote rising CO2 levels as being good for the planet. Follow the money and you'll find practically all of them either lack the necessary credentials to voice an informed opinion, they're paid by the fossil fuel industry, or they spent their whole life working in it.

The weather I remember from my childhood doesn't happen anymore - if our own experiences aren't enough to convince us that the planet is changing, what is?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2019 at 8:13am
{Technophobe: Mother Nature might sort this one out for us}


Climate change to expose half of world’s population to disease-spreading mosquitoes by 2050, study finds

‘Pockets of habitat will open up across many urban areas with vast amounts of individuals susceptible to infection’

Harry Cockburn 2 hours ago

Climate change and modern travel are facilitating the spread of diseases around the world

Over the next 30 years, mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and the Zika virus are on course to spread – posing a risk to half the world’s population, new research has revealed.

Two of the main disease-spreading mosquitoes – Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus – are forecast to significantly expand their range due to warming temperatures.

The models forecast that by 2050, 49 per cent of the world’s population will live in places where these species are established if greenhouse gas emissions continue at current rates, and if they are not curbed, even greater areas will be at risk.


“If no action is taken to reduce the current rate at which the climate is warming, pockets of habitat will open up across many urban areas with vast amounts of individuals susceptible to infection,” said Moritz Kraemer, an infectious disease scientist at Boston Children’s Hospital and the University of Oxford and who co-authored the new research, published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

Zika virus is considered a risk for pregnant women as it can cause birth defects in babies. After it was first identified in the 1950s, it remained present only in a narrow equatorial band in Africa and Asia. But in the 21st century the band widened and it also spread to the Americas. High rates of microcephaly were reported in parts of Brazil following the first South American Zika outbreak in 2015.
Mothers of babies afflicted by Zika fight poverty in Brazil
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Yellow fever can cause liver damage, pain, fatigue, nausea and can result in jaundice. It is deadly in 5 per cent of cases. Since the 1980s, the number of cases of yellow fever has been increasing, while it is believed immunity has fallen. Between 6 January and 4 May 2017, Brazil reported 1,392 cases of yellow fever, with a case-fatality rate of 34.2 per cent among confirmed cases, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

Dengue causes flu-like symptoms and affects most Asian and Latin American countries and has become “a leading cause of hospitalisation and death among children and adults”, according to the WHO. It is difficult to gain accurate infection rates due to frequent misdiagnosis and under-reporting.

Before 1970, only nine countries had experienced severe dengue epidemics. The disease is now endemic in more than 100 countries in parts of Africa, the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean, southeast Asia and the Western Pacific, according to the WHO.


The mosquitoes’ rapid regional expansion has been aided by modern human transport and trade, which will continue to facilitate their spread, the research team said.

“While their short flight ranges limit self-powered dispersal, a century of rapid human population growth and international trade has enabled their global spread,” the paper says.

“Trade in items such as tyres and potted plants have provided potential larval development habitats and have led to the intercontinental dissemination of the [mosquitoes eggs].”

The team gathered historic data on the distributions of A aegypti and A albopictus in more than 3,000 locations across Europe and the US going back as far as the 1970s and 1980s.

They also mapped the locations based on their present-day suitability as mosquito habitats, then projected their suitability in 2020, 2050 and 2080 using climate models and projections of urban growth. They also included human migration and travel patterns, using data from census and mobile phone records.

In recent years they found A aegypti has tended to spread over long distances, while A albopictus’s spread has been more localised.

Within the US, A aegypti spread north at a relatively constant rate, about 150 miles a year. A albopictus spread most quickly between 1990 and 1995. Its advance has since slowed to about 37 miles a year.

But in Europe, A albopictus has spread faster, advancing about 62 miles a year and increasing to 93 miles a year over the past five years.

In the next five to 15 years, the models predict the spread of both species will be driven by human movement, rather than environmental changes.

But thereafter, expansion will be driven more by changes in climate, temperature and urbanisation which will create new mosquito habitats. If climate change isn’t curbed by 2050, the spread is predicted to be even greater.

“With this new work, we can start to anticipate how the transmission of diseases like dengue and Zika might be influenced by a variety of environmental changes,” said Simon Hay, director of Geospatial Science at IHME and Professor of Health Metrics Sciences at the University of Washington.

“Incorporating this information into future scenarios of risk can help policymakers predict health impacts and help guide strategies to limit the spread of these mosquito species, an essential step to reduce the disease burden.”

{That should shrink the population a bit}


Source: https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-disease-mosquitoes-zika-virus-yellow-fever-dengue-spread-a8809996.html
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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