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Greta,to win Nobel Peace Prize

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    Posted: October 11 2019 at 1:42am


Environment

Greta Thunberg: The teenage climate activist tipped to win Nobel Peace Prize
Environmental campaigner delivered emotional speech to UN last month

Tom Parfitt
1 hour ago
90 comments
Swedish environment activist Greta Thunberg is being tipped to win the Nobel Peace Prize following a remarkable year in which the teenager’s “school strike for climate” movement has grown to worldwide prominence.

Here is everything you need to know about the 16-year-old.

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Greta Thunberg began a lone protest outside Sweden’s parliament in October 2018 when she was 15, saying would refuse to attend school on Fridays until the government tackled the growing climate and ecological crisis.


In the 12 months since, she has become one of the world’s most talked-about people, having been invited to speak at the UN general assembly – where she invoked the wrath of Donald Trump – and inspiring global protests attracting hundreds of thousands of young campaigners.

“You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,” the teenager told world leaders during her emotional and confrontational speech at the UN last month.


“And yet I’m one of the lucky ones. People are suffering. People are dying. Entire ecosystems are collapsing. We are in the beginning of a mass extinction. And all you can talk about is money and fairytales of eternal economic growth. How dare you.”

Greta Thunberg inspires climate activists everywhere: In pictures
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How have people responded to her?
Since being thrust into the global limelight, Greta’s climate activism has attracted scorn as well as praise.


Some right-wing critics have, with little evidence, denounced her as a liar or a hypocrite.

Read more
Greta Thunberg leads ‘500,000-strong’ climate march in Montreal
Others have highlighted her Asperger’s diagnosis and suggested she is being manipulated by her parents, actor Svante Thunberg and former Eurovision singer Malena Ernman.

Greta has repeatedly hit back at her critics, denying she is paid for her activism or is being “used” by anyone.

Earlier this year she wrote on Facebook to say “there is no one ‘behind’ me except for myself. My parents were as far from climate activists as possible before I made them aware of the situation”.

Donald Trump mocked Greta Thunberg in a recent tweet (AP)
Mr Trump, a notorious climate sceptic, took issue with her remarks at the UN, retweeting the video of her speech and sarcastically writing: “She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!”

Greta responded by changing her Twitter biography to read: “A very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future.”


Russian president Vladimir Putin, meanwhile, has accused her of failing to understand the realities of “complex” world. “When someone is using children and teenagers in personal interests, it only deserves to be condemned,” he said.

“I’m sure that Greta is a kind and very sincere girl. But adults must do everything not to bring teenagers and children into some extreme situations.”

Will Greta Thunberg win the Nobel Peace Prize?
If Greta is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on October 11, she would be the youngest recipient of the prestigious award, which has previously been won by the likes of Nelson Mandela and Barack Obama.


She would also be the first person to win the prize for environmental work since Al Gore, the former US vice president, who shared it with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2007.

“It’s hard to argue against the impact Thunberg’s actions have had globally, and that’s reflected in her odds as the favourite to win the Nobel Peace Prize,” said Ladbrokes spokesperson Jessica O’Reilly.

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Other candidates tipped to win the award include the Ethiopian prime minister Abiy Ahmed, Native Brazilian environmental leader Raoni Metuktire and New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern.

Greta was nominated for the award by three Norwegian MPs earlier this year.

“Greta Thunberg has launched a mass movement which I see as a major contribution to peace,” said Norwegian Socialist MP Freddy Andre Ovstegard.

MORE ABOUT
GRETA THUNBERG | NOBEL PEACE PRIZE | CLIMATE CHANGE



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 11 2019 at 1:43am
Chump is not going to be happy LMAO
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 11 2019 at 3:19am
Oh well she didn't win, nice to be up there with a chance

Good on her.....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EdwinSm, Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 11 2019 at 10:12pm
I am sure she deserves a major prize, but in my opinion a "Peace" prize is not an appropriate prize.   

But then the Noble peace prize has had a very wide definition of "Peace" - The commentators on the local news talked that this year they went back to the more traditional type of thing the peace prize was associated with.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Albert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 14 2019 at 1:22pm
Greta is a snot-nosed kid. Her parents are actors. I'm not even convinced that global warming is bad at this point. Takes more than a few tears from a child actor to convince me. But best of luck to her.     
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Malala Yousafzai
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The Nobel Peace Prize 2014
Kailash Satyarthi
Malala Yousafzai
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Malala Yousafzai
Biographical
Malala YousafzaiMalala Yousafzai was born on July 12, 1997, in Mingora, the largest city in the Swat Valley in what is now the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan. She is the daughter of Ziauddin and Tor Pekai Yousafzai and has two younger brothers.

At a very young age, Malala developed a thirst for knowledge. For years her father, a passionate education advocate himself, ran a learning institution in the city, and school was a big part of Malala’s family. She later wrote that her father told her stories about how she would toddle into classes even before she could talk and acted as if she were the teacher.

In 2007, when Malala was ten years old, the situation in the Swat Valley rapidly changed for her family and community. The Taliban began to control the Swat Valley and quickly became the dominant socio-political force throughout much of northwestern Pakistan. Girls were banned from attending school, and cultural activities like dancing and watching television were prohibited. Suicide attacks were widespread, and the group made its opposition to a proper education for girls a cornerstone of its terror campaign. By the end of 2008, the Taliban had destroyed some 400 schools.

Determined to go to school and with a firm belief in her right to an education, Malala stood up to the Taliban. Alongside her father, Malala quickly became a critic of their tactics. “How dare the Taliban take away my basic right to education?” she once said on Pakistani TV.

In early 2009, Malala started to blog anonymously on the Urdu language site of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). She wrote about life in the Swat Valley under Taliban rule, and about her desire to go to school. Using the name “Gul Makai,” she described being forced to stay at home, and she questioned the motives of the Taliban.

Malala was 11 years old when she wrote her first BBC diary entry. Under the blog heading “I am afraid,” she described her fear of a full-blown war in her beautiful Swat Valley, and her nightmares about being afraid to go to school because of the Taliban.

Pakistan’s war with the Taliban was fast approaching, and on May 5, 2009, Malala became an internally displaced person (IDP), after having been forced to leave her home and seek safety hundreds of miles away.

On her return, after weeks of being away from Swat, Malala once again used the media and continued her public campaign for her right to go to school. Her voice grew louder, and over the course of the next three years, she and her father became known throughout Pakistan for their determination to give Pakistani girls access to a free quality education. Her activism resulted in a nomination for the International Children’s Peace Prize in 2011. That same year, she was awarded Pakistan’s National Youth Peace Prize. But, not everyone supported and welcomed her campaign to bring about change in Swat. On the morning of October 9, 2012, 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot by the Taliban.

Seated on a bus heading home from school, Malala was talking with her friends about schoolwork. Two members of the Taliban stopped the bus. A young bearded Talib asked for Malala by name, and fired three shots at her. One of the bullets entered and exited her head and lodged in her shoulder. Malala was seriously wounded. That same day, she was airlifted to a Pakistani military hospital in Peshawar and four days later to an intensive care unit in Birmingham, England.

Once she was in the United Kingdom, Malala was taken out of a medically induced coma. Though she would require multiple surgeries, including repair of a facial nerve to fix the paralyzed left side of her face, she had suffered no major brain damage. In March 2013, after weeks of treatment and therapy, Malala was able to begin attending school in Birmingham.

After the shooting, her incredible recovery and return to school resulted in a global outpouring of support for Malala. On July 12, 2013, her 16th birthday, Malala visited New York and spoke at the United Nations. Later that year, she published her first book, an autobiography entitled “I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban.” On October 10, 2013, in acknowledgement of her work, the European Parliament awarded Malala the prestigious Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought.

In 2014, through the Malala Fund, the organization she co-founded with her father, Malala traveled to Jordan to meet Syrian refugees, to Kenya to meet young female students, and finally to northern Nigeria for her 17th birthday. In Nigeria, she spoke out in support of the abducted girls who were kidnapped earlier that year by Boko Haram, a terrorist group which, like the Taliban, tries to stop girls from going to school.

In October 2014, Malala, along with Indian children’s rights activist Kailash Satyarthi, was named a Nobel Peace Prize winner. At age 17, she became the youngest person to receive this prize. Accepting the award, Malala reaffirmed that “This award is not just for me. It is for those forgotten children who want education. It is for those frightened children who want peace. It is for those voiceless children who want change.”

Today, the Malala Fund has become an organization that, through education, empowers girls to achieve their potential and become confident and strong leaders in their own countries. Funding education projects in six countries and working with international leaders, the Malala Fund joins with local partners to invest in innovative solutions on the ground and advocates globally for quality secondary education for all girls.

Currently residing in Birmingham, Malala is an active proponent of education as a fundamental social and economic right. Through the Malala Fund and with her own voice, Malala Yousafzai remains a staunch advocate for the power of education and for girls to become agents of change in their communities.

From The Nobel Prizes 2014. Published on behalf of The Nobel Foundation by Science History Publications/USA, division Watson Publishing International LLC, Sagamore Beach, 2015
This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and later published in the book series Les Prix Nobel/ Nobel Lectures/The Nobel Prizes. The information is sometimes updated with an addendum submitted by the Laureate.

Copyright © The Nobel Foundation 2014
To cite this section
MLA style: Malala Yousafzai – Biographical. NobelPrize.org. Nobel Media AB 2019. Sun. 13 Oct 2019. <https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2014/yousafzai/biographical/>;

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Malala Yousafzai
Facts
Malala Yousafzai
Photo: K. Opprann
Malala Yousafzai
The Nobel Peace Prize 2014

Born: 12 July 1997, Mingora, Pakistan

Residence at the time of the award: United Kingdom

Prize motivation: "for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education."

Prize share: 1/2

Life
Malala Yousafzai was born in the Swat district of northwestern Pakistan, where her father was a school owner and was active in educational issues. After having blogged for the BBC since 2009 about her experiences during the Taliban's growing influence in the region, in 2012 the Taliban attempted to assassinate Malala Yousafzai on the bus home from school. She survived, but underwent several operations in the UK, where she lives today. In addition to her schooling, she continues her work for the right of girls to education.

Work
Much of the world's population, especially in poor countries, is made up of children and young people. To achieve a peaceful world, it is crucial that the rights of children and young people be respected. Injustices perpetrated against children contribute to the spread of conflicts to future generations. Already at eleven years of age Malala Yousafzai fought for girls' right to education. After having suffered an attack on her life by Taliban gunmen in 2012, she has continued her struggle and become a leading advocate of girls' rights.

To cite this section
MLA style: Malala Yousafzai – Facts. NobelPrize.org. Nobel Media AB 2019. Sun. 13 Oct 2019. <https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2014/yousafzai/facts/>;

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About the Nobel Prize organisation
The Nobel Foundation
Tasked with a mission to manage Alfred Nobel's fortune and has ultimate responsibility for fulfilling the intentions of Nobel's will.

The prize-awarding institutions
For more than a century, these academic institutions have worked independently to select Nobel Laureates in each prize category.

Nobel Prize outreach activities
Several outreach organisations and activities have been developed to inspire generations and disseminate knowledge about the Nobel Prize.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 14 2019 at 1:48pm
The difference between these two

"Children" is....

One is saying something you agree with.....

The other goes against your beliefs......

I don't think anyone over 40 has a voice in this argument

We have our time....

Leaving this planet in an awful mess for our grandchildren......

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 14 2019 at 2:11pm
The science is now finally clear on global warming. It has several causes, by far the largest of which is us humans. The future world is in big trouble.

Yes, that will be worse for our children and worse still for our grandchildren.

Anyone not getting that simply is not paying attention to current, accepted scientific opinion - backed up now by real data.

But don't silence the voices of the older generations. I care about my children, my genetic line and life/the world in general - for me a matter of faith. I am not unique in this.

Finally Greta. She is a child. She is a child with aspergers. She understands the science rather well, but people not at all. Adults have probably chivvied and coached her into "taking a stand". Don't blame her. Pawns are pushed around the board, sometimes even becoming queen, but are powered by another's hand.

Keep your hands clean. Keep them off of the kid.
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 15 2019 at 2:50am
CNN: Ban air miles to combat climate crisis, UK committee recommends.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/air-miles-ban-report-scli-intl/index.html
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