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HELP: Stove recommendations?

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otskot View Drop Down
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    Posted: February 21 2006 at 11:22am
Help.
I need to purchase a little stove for cooking and would like your recommendations? I've seen some that use coleman fuel, others that use propane, etc. I'm not sure what to get. I expect that we might be "cooking" an hour a day? Give or take. Some I'd really like to know what you all are using. We don't have a woodburning stove, so won't be able to use it. So, for the small little portables, etc. what is the easiest to use, fuel last longest, cheapest, etc.?? Thanks in advance!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 21 2006 at 11:27am
Coleman camp stove, you can get an attachment hose that you can attach a larger bottle of propane, same size as on a barbque. It's worth the money, otherwise your going thru alot of little bottles.
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Angel View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Angel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 21 2006 at 11:38am
If you do not have a lot of money to spend and you have a small deck or place outside to cook  I saw a small charcoal grill at our local KMart store for $19.95.  You would, also, have to buy some charcoal and lighter fluid.  It would a cheap way to go.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zoe17 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 21 2006 at 12:31pm
Coleman propane stove, is easiest. Dual fuel is better, but you have to pump it up, but it will use almost any fuel.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 21 2006 at 1:01pm
The Setup Siameselade described is one I used for several years aboard my sailboat.  Used a 10lb cylender (up on deck) with a hose threaded down to the camp stove below.  We'd get about 6-8 weeks of cooking out of that setup.  A couple of 20lb cylenders would probably give you 5 months of cooking.

Propane is heavier than air, and camp stoves give off carbon monoxide.  Use caution when employing in a confined space.  CO alarm highly recommended.  Despite warnings from other boaters about the `explosion' hazard of propane, we never had a problem. Meanwhile, several boaters I knew who used `safer'  alcohol stoves were badly burned. 

Depending on where you live, solar cooking can be used on sunny days.  A cheap solar cooker can be made for about 5 or 6 dollars.  I wouldn't count on one for day to day cooking, but it could be used on good `cooking' days to save on propane.




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otskot View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otskot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 21 2006 at 1:40pm
Great info. Thanks all so far.

Hey Fla_Medic, excuse my ignorance here, but when you mention the 20 lb. propane cylinders, are these the same as the ones you use in your outdoor grills? And how much cooking did you do on average per day, when you were on your boat? And finally what kind of stove did you use -- a 2 burner or one burner? I just want to make sure, we've enough "fuel" for an extended home stay.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TNbebo408 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 21 2006 at 6:32pm
Otskot, I have several of the coleman gas type stoves, by gas I mean coleman fuel or gasoline. One is 50 years old, and has worked many times on plain unleaded gasoline. The old Amoco worked best, it was white or unleaded years ago.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 21 2006 at 6:56pm
A 20lb cylender is what you normally find on an outdoor grill.

We used a two burner coleman camp stove, although we often only used one burner at a time.   Averaged an hour of cooking a day.

Probably can safely figure 80-100 burner/hours of cooking on a 20lb tank.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 23 2006 at 6:30pm
Hi, another option: www.BePrepared.com is selling a little collapsible one-burner  for $7.95, safe to use indoors. Each heat cell-fuel canister is good for 5 hours, costs $3.50. I've got one on order with some of fuel canisters. Somebody had posted a web-site for a solar oven, which really intrigues me. Requires NO fuel at all, just some sun-light. But it's costly, $189 plus S&H, so I need to think about that some more. For that kind of money, I can order a load of fuel canisters and not need to worry about the weather at all.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Spoon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 23 2006 at 8:00pm

One way to minimize your fuel consumption is to use a thermal cooker.

http://www.sunpowerusa.com/nfa-b450.html

http://www.thermosonline.com/products/CC4500S.htm?id=google

It's not so much the apocalypse... but the credit card bills ;-)
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otskot View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otskot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 24 2006 at 1:24pm
Those thermal cookers are really cool -- uh, I guess I more correctly should say really "hot". Thanks
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fritz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 24 2006 at 4:33pm
Femvet I'm with you. I just bought a couple of those at my local camping store and I have several cases of sterno. Low tech is what is comfortable for me. Nice and easy. :>}
"I am only one; but still I am one, I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." -- Hellen Keller
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TJ108 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 08 2006 at 7:02pm
For the money I think this is the coolest stove to have

Outback Stainless Steel Camp Stove/Oven


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bruss01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 08 2006 at 7:46pm

TJ -

That's extremely COOL!  I love it!

Of course, that will work only as long as you have propane for it.  Coleman makes a collapsable box oven that will work off any heat source.  Here's an article describing it.  When we get down to burning sticks and twigs and bits of 2x4, it's definitely going to be the bomb.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote steve 101 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 08 2006 at 8:19pm

what about a hay box

bring to the boil whatever you are cooking, then put whole pot in a box that is large enough to pack well with hay or straw. Cover well with hay then put lid on box and leave to finish off. Apparently you can cook a roast in these. I havent used one. Put on in early morning and leave all day. I heard that cast iron pots are great for this

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote andrew p Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 08 2006 at 8:32pm
I have a friend who recommeded the Sierra Zip stove. It is a small backpacking stove that apparently can burn just about anything, with the help of a small fan. Here  is a link to some reviews.

http://www.thebackpacker.com/gear/stoves/zz_manufacturing_si erra_zip_stove.php

Sorry I'm having trouble with the link adding button.

I recently ordered one, and look forward to testing it. What I like is that you don't have to light a big fire and waste a lot of fuel and heat. I have a ten acre woodlot, but I can't see lighting the woodstove in the summer, and making a bonfire for oatmeal seems like a bit of overkill. Out in the woods seems like a nice place to store the fuel, rather than having to find more space in my poor shed or basement for more propane, etc.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bohemians Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 09 2006 at 9:59am
We opted for a multi fuel stove like mountain climbers and others use. It runs on any gasoline, diesel, kerosene, mineral spirits, lamp oil ect. Got it on ebay. Also take a look at the ones made by "Britelyt". Coleman fuel and gasoline was not available around here durring Rita. We save our Coleman stoves for weekend camping trips.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Fastcard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 12 2006 at 10:11am

I you want a simple stove the Japanese and Koreans do alot of cooking on Butane  cassete stove, They have pizo lighting, great heat control and  stability. Alot of markets and  food places use them for cooking  samples. They cost about 20.00 butane cans are 5.00 for four cans.

You can get a couple hours per can, depending on setting and they have great heat control. My local Bristol Farms does there cafe cooking with them and they use them for cooking at buffets

I am using propane for the most part in the long term, but  These stove are so nice I have put a couple of them away because they are so convienient and safe. These stove are about as safe as you can get indoors and they make a wide variety of accesories for them. They were orginally made for people to cook ramen at their desk!

 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oknut Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 12 2006 at 1:08pm

Coleman collapsable oven

I just ordered one of those.  I actually had an older one but gifted it to someone last Christmas.  We have one of the camp stoves that will operate on unleaded gas and a charcoal grill.  Our kitchen has a old gas rangetop and a small wall oven.  The oven doesn't work if the electricity is out, but the rangetop does so I could probably use this portable oven in the  kitchen if the power is out to bake bread or biscuits.   I'll keep this one and could kick myself for giving away the one I had. 

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