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Herpes linked to Alzheimer's in two major studies

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    Posted: June 24 2018 at 4:54pm
Alzheimer's research could be set for a shake up after two studies suggest that scientists may have been missing the disease's real cause - herpes.

One of the studies shows elevated levels of the virus in the brains of people with Alzheimer's. More remarkably, the virus seems to be switching on genes linked to increasing Alzheimer's risk.

An expert in Alzheimer's research, Professor Ralph Martins, who holds a chair in Alzheimer’s disease at Edith Cowan University, has called the paper "high-calibre", but cautioned that it also raised questions.

“In the past, there has never been any strong science for this. There is no question this is a high-calibre paper, the highest level I’ve ever seen in this space. It adds a lot of credibility, but also raises a lot of questions we need to address,” Professor Martins said.

Scans of a brain from an Alzheimer's sufferer. Two new studies suggest the herpesvirus could be linked to the disease.

Photo: AP

The strains of herpes implicated are not sexually transmitted, nor do they cause cold sores. In fact they are exceptionally common, largely symptomless, and almost impossible to avoid, infecting about 90 per cent of children.


A few researchers have long suspected herpes and other viruses might have a role in Alzheimer's, but there has never been strong evidence to back up their suspicions.

The studies, one published this week in top journal Neuron and the other to be published soon in the same journal, show for the first time a potential cause and effect.

The first study reveals large concentrations of herpesvirus in the brain regions associated with Alzheimer's. There, the virus seems to be triggering certain genes that other studies have linked to increased Alzheimer's risk.

In the second study, by a team from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University and reported in  The New York Times, herpes was shown to activate the growth of amyloid plaques - the damaging clogs that stop the brain functioning properly - in the brains of mice.

Taken together the studies suggest two possibilities.

One, herpesvirus might manipulate human DNA, increasing Alzheimer’s risk.

Or two, amyloid might be part of the brain’s natural defences against viruses, misfiring or overreacting in people with Alzheimer’s.

“Up until now, this would have been one of the less-prominent ideas. That’s the importance of this paper,” says Professor Bryce Vissel, director of the University of Technology Sydney Centre for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine and a leading critic of mainstream Alzheimer’s research.

Alzheimer’s so far remains stubbornly incurable, and drug companies have spent billions on failed therapeutic trials. Professor Vissel believes scientific groupthink is holding up research into other promising theories.

Most top brain scientists believe Alzheimer’s is caused by the growth of clogging plaques known as amyloid across the aging brain, a case for which there is strong evidence.

Meanwhile, infection theories have always been difficult for scientists to prove because of Alzheimer’s long course, taking many years to degrade the brain.

Critics of the virus theory argue that a weakened brain is more susceptible to viruses, hence the prescence of viruses in the brains of those with Alzheimer's.

Indeed, several co-authors on the study are long-time sceptics of the virus-Alzheimer’s theory.

The work was done by a team who were specialists in big data, rather than brain diseases. They set out to hunt for potential new treatments for the disease.

“We didn't set out to find what we found. Not even close,” said Joel Dudley, a geneticist at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York, who was senior author on the first paper.

"We were trying to find drugs that could be repurposed to treat Alzheimer's patients, but the patterns that emerged from our data-driven analysis all pointed towards these viral biology themes."

Using powerful computers, they compared DNA from the brains of 944 people who had died with Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases to look for similarities.

But as they went through the samples, the computers picked out unexpected DNA, and lots of it. On closer inspection, Mr Dudley’s team found large amounts of herpesvirus in the patients’ brains.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2018 at 9:43pm
Ok, so are we talking about the cold sore I occasionally get on my lip giving me Alzheimer's? If so WOW!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 12:27am
Yes, but it is more complicated than that.  Herpes appears to be a factor, but almost every adult carries the disease and not all of us go on to get the dementia. 

Personally, I suspect viruses are behind lots more diseases than we used to think.
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 1:05am
I also think that Techno,

my wife gets cold sores so does my son,daughter and I don't get them ....odd
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote guest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 6:30am
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d6ac/c48395b2e779532eadd8b57744e7f991461f.pdf

My son and I have used Italian red wine to topically treat herpes simplex. It starts to heal the lesions within a day. Prescription remedies failed.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote guest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 6:49am
I put a tablespoon of the wine in a little bowl on the kitchen counter top. Every time I passed by I dabbed a little on the lesions and the adjoining unaffected areas. About every 2 hours all day. Did it for 3 or 4 days. They healed rapidly. It took several months for them to recur. After one or two occurrences the problem was gone. 
I didn't know how much of the skin area to cover ... so I gargled with the wine morning and night and swabbed it in my nose and around my entire mouth too ...  twice a day.
I haven't had another herpes simplex attack in over 20 years now.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 7:02am
Thank you Guest!

That is such helpful information to so many people.   I know someone who (by accident!) used the same cure.  A cohort of two is hardly a major double blind study, but so far it = 100% effective!  That does beat the perscription stuff - hands down.

Stuff like that is life-blood to us AFTers.  Can I persuade you to join up?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 12:53pm
To continue harping on about my previous point:

Mysteries uncovered over virus linked to type 1 diabetes


Research into how the immune system responds to a certain virus could help in the hunt for ways to prevent type 1 diabetes.

King's College London scientists have identified that immune cells recognise multiple virus parts when responding to a coxsackie B virus infection. Known as CBV, the virus has been linked to the onset of type 1 diabetes.

Coxsackie B is a group of six pathogenic enteroviruses which trigger illnesses ranging from gastrointestinal distress to myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle.

This study involved using sophisticated computer software to forecast which parts of the virus were identified and attacked by the immune system.

The results were then compared with how the immune cells of people with type 1 diabetes reacted to a CBV infection. The reaction of immune cells from people without the condition were also examined.

The findings revealed that immune cells could bind to eight parts of the virus and analysis showed that the immune cells would likely recognise multiple aspects of the virus. They also found no difference in the reaction of the immune cells of those with and without type 1 diabetes.

Charity JDRF, which funded the research, believes the findings could help towards a vaccine against CBV. A JDRF spokesman said: "Researchers have for some time suspected CBVs of playing a role in triggering or exacerbating type 1 diabetes. What remains unclear however is how exactly CBVs could be doing this.

"If we can work out how the body responds to a CBV infection, we may be able to design vaccines and treatments to protect against CBVs, and potentially protect some people from ever developing type 1 diabetes. The researchers therefore wanted to investigate how certain types of immune cells respond to a CBV infection."

Now the scientists aim to carry out more research with larger numbers of participants and also in children. Additionally, they want to study those just diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

The research was published by the PLOS One journal.


....................... You have to wonder how many more.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote guest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2018 at 8:56am
I discovered the red wine treatment ... and more treatments  for many conditions ...  in this book:
  • The Food Pharmacy (1989) by Jean Carper
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GUEST Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2018 at 9:35am
Years ago.. in the 90's I talked to Dr. Luther Lindner (Texas AMU). (He was working on Multiple Sclerosis at the time.) 
It was regarding my mother and a friend's mother.  Both had dementia.
As a result of the conversation, my friend put her mom (85) on doxycycline for weeks. It reversed the condition. It brought her back to reality.
There might be a connection between MS and dementia ..  or the treatment was the same. It was so long ago I just don't recall all the details.
It bears looking into.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2018 at 2:44pm
there has been talk of MS being a STD,

not 100% on that im sure someone can enlighten us Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2018 at 3:31pm
Hmmmmmm...................  That is a good one. 

The official line, known and proven, in line with the scientific studies - so far, is that it is an autoimmune disease.  But that is where the known stuff ends.  No one knows why the person's immune system turns on them.  An infectious agent arriving on succeptible genes, or being contracted whilst some other environmental trigger was present, or all three at once, could be the explanation for the researchers' failure to nail down the specifics.

I had to euthanise one of my pet cats a couple of years ago, because he developed a form of aplastic anemia.  The trigger for this was a parasite which attached itself to his red blood cells.  His immune system then got confused between his own red blood cells and the foreign invader.  Most who cats get the parasite have no symptoms at all and clear the infection with nobody noticing.  My lovely Ducky (Named after the NCIS character) was not so lucky.  So, anyway, Yet again, an autoimmune disease caused by an infection.

I think that may well be one of the MS puzzle's missing pieces.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GUEST Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2018 at 5:06pm
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060831084402.htm

I did come across a Japanese study over 8 years ago regarding pear juice and alzheimer's.
I had some very heavily producing pear trees at the time and was wondering if they were a good remedy for any ailment out there.
The study claimed that pear juice replaced an acid in the brain that we lose as we get older.
Since I was losing my memory at the time, I decided to make pear juice and freeze it. It was so good I drank about a quart of it the day I was making it.
The next day my poor brain was racing. I was so very alert. My memory returned that day and has been ok ever since.
I stuffed my freezer full of concentrated pear juice. I drank 12 ounces a day for the following year.   
And I do drink pear juice a couple of times a week now.  I just thawed out a quart yesterday.
But I drink more of my homemade concord juice and wild grape juice. I drink only 8 ounces a day. More than that and my blood gets too thin. My dentist had a devil of a time stopping bleeding around a tooth he was working on a few years ago.
So I dropped the grape juice from 12 ounce a day to 8 ... and haven't had that problem since.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GUEST Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2018 at 5:10pm
Sorry, I omitted something. They were KEIFER pears.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GUEST Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2018 at 5:36pm
My trees were KIEFFER pear trees. I got the spelling wrong.

I just recalled an incident that occurred a few years ago. I met a woman whose mother had just died at the age of 98. She said her mind was sharp as a tack. What puzzled her mother and the rest of the family was why her mother escaped having dementia or Alzheimer's.
She came from a family of 9 children. All 8 of her brothers and sisters  developed dementia or Alzheimer's as they got older.
But not her mother.
I asked her if her mother drank pear juice. She was taken aback. She said her mother had a very old and large pear tree in her yard and canned pears every fall. She loved her canned  pears and ate them  every day!
I told her daughter she had better do the same, as the Japanese had discovered the juice was a remedy for dementia.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 27 2018 at 11:47am
On the virus theme, it is well known that HPV is cancer causing and mononeucleosis increases risk, now HTLV-1 is also shown as carcinogenic.  The more I look the more connections I find.

Anyway, here is somebumf on why HTLV-1 is so nasty:


Cancer-causing virus HTLV-1 changes DNA loops to 'affect tens of thousands of genes'


Imperial College London

A human virus that causes a rare form of leukaemia increases the risk of disease by changing the way DNA loops inside our cells.

The research, published in the journal eLife, shows that the human leukaemia virus (HTLV-1) acts at a large number of sites across the human genome, disrupting the regulation of tens of thousands of genes.

According to the team, from Imperial College London and The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the findings show that the HTLV-1 changes the folding pattern of human DNA in infected cells. They explain that the resulting disruption of gene function increases the risk of leukaemia.

HTLV-1 is thought to infect more than 10 million people around the world. The virus can be transmitted through unprotected sex, blood transfusions, and from mother to baby via breast milk.

People can carry the virus for decades without symptoms, and 90 per cent of people may be unaware they are carrying it at all. However, an estimated 5-10 per cent of those infected may go on to develop an aggressive form of leukaemia or a progressive paralytic disease.

In the latest study, researchers looked at how HTLV-1 interacts with human DNA when it infects a host, focusing on its target: specialised white blood cells called T-cells.

Each human cell contains around two metres of DNA, neatly packaged into the nucleus. In order to fit, these twisting strands are tightly coiled and then wrapped around proteins, creating a densely packed genetic spaghetti structure called chromatin.

The chromatin is not randomly organised, but is folded into thousands of loops, which stick out from the main 'strand'. These loops expose certain regions of DNA to the cell's machinery that reads and copies DNA, enabling specific chunks of the genome to be more easily read and transcribed.

Recent research has shown that disrupting these existing loops, or creating new loops, alters the control of gene expression and may be linked to a host of diseases.

The research team isolated T-cells from HTLV-1-infected patients and analysed which regions of the DNA were altered. They found that the virus binds to a protein called CTCF, which is the key protein that forms normal loops in the human genome. As a result, the virus changes the structure of the loop and the activity of genes within it.

Professor Charles Bangham, Chair of immunology in the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London and lead author of the study, said: "Through binding to these specific sites in the genome, retroviruses like HTLV-1 can alter chromatin loops and disrupt how a number of important genes are regulated. This can lead to the abnormalities and disease, such as the leukaemia associated with HTLV-1."

The researchers explain that due to the large number of CTCF sites scattered throughout the human genome, viruses such as HTLV-1 have the potential to disrupt tens of thousands of genes in the human genome.

They add that the findings provide new insight into how viruses like HTLV-1 can alter the structure of the human genome, which can result in diseases such as cancer.

Ewan Birney, Director of the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and co-author, added: "This study illustrates that by combining wet lab and dry lab expertise, we can explore previously inaccessible biological processes.

"By integrating complex genomic data - in this case haplotype-resolved data - into our analysis, we have gained new insights into how the human T-cell leukaemia virus works. In turn, this could help us understand why certain patients experience such devastating symptoms, while others are asymptomatic."


Source:   https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/icl-cvh062718.php

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 15 2018 at 3:25pm
Here is a bit more on the alzheimers-herpes link:

Alzheimer's risk 10 times lower with herpes medication

Published
Fact checked by Jasmin Collier
New results could change the face of Alzheimer's treatment; the herpes simplex virus is found to play a vital role in the condition, and antiherpetic medication is shown to have a dramatic effect on dementia risk.
elderly womans hands taking medication
Alzheimer's disease may soon be treated with antiviral medication.

Last month, Medical News Today reported on a study that found "strong evidence" that viruses are involved in Alzheimer's disease.

The postmortem analyses of brain tissue found that people who lived with this dementia type also had more herpesviruses 6 and 7 than people without Alzheimer's.

Now, a scientific commentary suggests that the study that MNT covered is not the only one to pinpoint a link between herpes and dementia.

In fact, three more studies have strengthened this link, and the commentary — recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease – takes a look at all three.

Ruth Itzhaki, who is a professor of neuroscience and experimental psychology at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, alongside Richard Lathe, who is a professor in the Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, also in the U.K., authored the commentary.

'Remarkable magnitude of antiviral effect'

The studies referenced in the commentary are two articles (Tsai et al., 2017, and Chen et al., 2018) that suggest that acute herpes zoster infection puts people at a higher risk of dementia, and one article that shows that aggressive treatment with antiherpetic medication drastically lowers dementia risk.

The latter study — deemed "most important" by Profs. Itzhaki and Lathe — examined 8,362 people aged 50 and above who received a diagnosis of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, as well as a control group of 25,086 age-matched healthy people.

The two groups were followed for almost a decade, between 2001 and 2010. In the herpes group, the risk of dementia was over 2.5 times higher than in the control group.

Significantly, the study also revealed that aggressive antiviral treatment reduced the relative risk of dementia by 10 times.

Prof. Lathe comments on these new findings, saying, "Not only is the magnitude of the antiviral effect remarkable, but also the fact that — despite the relatively brief duration and the timing of treatment — in most patients severely affected by HSV1 it appeared to prevent the long-term damage in [the] brain that results in Alzheimer's."

"I believe we are the first to realize the implications of these striking data on this devastating condition which principally affects the elderly," Prof. Itzhaki adds.

"But," she says, "we believe that these safe and easily available antivirals may have a strong part to play in combating the disease in these patients." She also suggests that in the future, it may be possible to prevent the disease "by vaccination against the virus in infancy."

"Successful treatment by a specific drug, or successful vaccination against the putative microbe, are the only ways to prove that a microbe is the cause of a non-infectious human disease," says Prof. Itzhaki.

Source:  https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322463.php

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 15 2018 at 6:58pm
From what I read here we ALL who have Herpes (Cold Sores) or the other kind down south should take a good dose of an Anti-Viral. Should that help all of us keep our brains from going goofy?


Next check up with my Doc I will be asking for an anti-viral!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 15 2018 at 7:12pm
Does the pear juice must be Kieffer pears?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GUEST Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 21 2018 at 10:32am
I also made pear juice from my Red Bartlett, Ayers and Moonglow trees. 
I  drink all of the juices, and they all seem to work the same on my memory.  My memory is fine so far.

Powdered cocoa also works on Altzheimer's. Nestle, Hershey and herbalcom.com sell it. Herbalcom's is organic.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4170833/
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