Click to Translate to English Click to Translate to French  Click to Translate to Spanish  Click to Translate to German  Click to Translate to Italian  Click to Translate to Japanese  Click to Translate to Chinese Simplified  Click to Translate to Korean  Click to Translate to Arabic  Click to Translate to Russian  Click to Translate to Portuguese


Forum Home Forum Home > General Discussion > General Discussion
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - How Dangerous is CWD?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

How Dangerous is CWD?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123
Author
Message
Technophobe View Drop Down
Senior Moderator
Senior Moderator
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2014
Location: Scotland
Status: Offline
Points: 55215
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 04 2019 at 5:45am
Or the short version: still spreading.
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
Back to Top
Technophobe View Drop Down
Senior Moderator
Senior Moderator
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2014
Location: Scotland
Status: Offline
Points: 55215
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 05 2019 at 2:21am
['And now this INSANITY raises its head!]

Hunting group rallies behind researcher with new theory on fatal deer disease
By:

    Matt Heckel

Posted: Feb 04, 2019 05:29 PM EST

Updated: Feb 04, 2019 05:29 PM EST


HARRISBURG, Pa. (WHTM) - Since it first discovered in the 1960s, chronic wasting disease has been found in 24 states including Pennsylvania.

The disease affects deer and elk. It is always fatal and there is no cure.

But one scientist is working on one.

The Unified Sportsmen of Pennsylvania spoke Monday at the state Capitol in support of a researcher who says he has found the true cause of chronic wasting disease. The group announced a funding drive to help him complete his research.

The mainstream theory is that the disease is caused by a malformed protein called a prion.

Dr. Frank Dastian, of Louisiana State University's Department of Agriculture, believes the disease is caused by a previously undiscovered species of bacteria called spiroplasma.

Bastian's team is working on developing a diagnostic kit that would allow hunters to immediately test deer for the disease in the field. Their ultimate goal is to develop a vaccine.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission responded in a statement, saying "decades of research have provided abundant evidence that prions are the infectious agent of CWD. The commission said while alternative theories exist, they have not been thoroughly researched.


Source:   https://www.abc27.com/news/state/hunting-group-rallies-behind-researcher-with-new-theory-on-fatal-deer-disease/1754680686



[Technophobe: Darwin awards can clean up the gene pool, but don't stand too close!

To explain the known biology of prions:

Many chemicals in the body (like proteins) do their job by virtue of their shape (like a spanner which turns nuts because it fits them perfectly - a product of its shape). Prions are proteins which have become folded into the wrong shape (like a screwed up piece of paper instead of an oriagami bird).

Enzymes breakdown and build up proteins into specific shapes that the body needs. Sometimes proteins themselves fold others.

These disease causing prions are small pieces of protein which are both the wrong shape and fold other pieces of the same type as themselves into the wrong shape too. Soon the cell is devoid of all versions of that particular protein in the right shape and (for lack of a number 9 spanner in the toolbox) the cell dies. It ruptures and the alien protein goes on to wreck more spanners. After a while enough cells die to develop symptoms and eventually the sufferer dies.

This much is known for certain and has been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt in the laboratory.

What bends the first 'spanner' out of shape is unknown. But more to the point, we do not know how to bend the 'spanners' back again.

It may be that a rogue protein in a particular bacteria started the process, but that does not change the fact that each broken 'spanner' breaks more of its siblings. Fighting the bacteria could not even slow down the outbreak now.

Anyone who thinks they can test their deer this way is barking mad! My best hope for this bunch of nutters is they do not feed their friends.]
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
Back to Top
Technophobe View Drop Down
Senior Moderator
Senior Moderator
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2014
Location: Scotland
Status: Offline
Points: 55215
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2019 at 7:54am

Hunters in 24 US states warned of ‘zombie deer’ disease

Mike Wehner @MikeWehner

February 14th, 2019 at 11:07 PM


Deer hunting is a big deal in many U.S. states, and surveys suggest that around 10 million hunters participate in the activity regularly. As any hunter will tell you, nabbing a deer isn’t always the easiest of tasks, but a growing risk of disease is making things even more difficult for sportsmen even after they’ve bagged a buck or doe.

Public health officials and infectious disease researchers are doing their best to raise awareness of an illness that has now been confirmed in deer populations across at least 24 states. It’s called chronic wasting disease, and the Centers for Disease Control fears that it may be possible that the disease could spread to humans who eat infected animals.


If you live in an area where deer hunting is common you’ve no doubt heard of chronic wasting disease (or CWD) before. It’s not a particularly new disease — it was originally discovered in the late 1960s — but confirmed cases of it among wild deer and elk populations have spread to new states rapidly since 2001.

The disease is absolutely devastating to animals that are affected by it. They take on a “zombie-like” state and exhibit odd behavior and physical deteriorating, with exposed ribs and an overall sickly appearance.

CWD affects the brain with misfolded proteins known as prions. Prion diseases exist in humans and are typically fatal, and the same is true for animals with CWD. The disease progresses until the animal dies, and there is no known cure or way to reverse the damage.

The CDC warns against the consumption of (or even physical contact with) an animal thought to be infected with CWD. It is recommended that animals suspected to have CWD be left alone and not harvested. Hunters are advised to have any animals they kill in areas known to have CWD tested for the disease before eating the meat, even if the animal appeared healthy.

It’s worth noting that there’s been no scientific evidence that CWD can be transmitted from infected deer to humans. However, prion disease infections from animal consumption have been implicated in deaths in the past, so it’s obviously best to err on the side of caution.


Source:   https://bgr.com/2019/02/14/zombie-deer-disease-cwd-infection/
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
Back to Top
Technophobe View Drop Down
Senior Moderator
Senior Moderator
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2014
Location: Scotland
Status: Offline
Points: 55215
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 16 2019 at 8:35am
[Technophobe: There is very little new info in this article, but it does illuminate the point that the authorities are starting to take an interest. A few people have seen the growing danger at last; there is a huge swathes of articles across the internet on this story and variations thereof.]


'Zombie' deer disease is in 24 states and thousands of infected deer are eaten each year, expert warns

Ryan W. Miller USA TODAY
Published 11:16 AM EST Feb 16, 2019

An infectious disease deadly in deer has spread to 24 states as experts warn the ailment – unofficially dubbed "Zombie" deer disease – could one day hit humans.

Chronic wasting disease, or CWD, has afflicted free-ranging deer, elk and/or moose in 24 states and two Canadian provinces as of January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

"We are in an unknown territory situation," Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, told USA TODAY on Friday.

Last week, Osterholm testified before his state lawmakers warning about possible human impacts.

"It is probable that human cases of chronic wasting disease associated with consumption with contaminated meat will be documented in the years ahead," he said. "It’s possible the number of human cases will be substantial, and will not be isolated events."

More: 'Zombie' deer disease: What is it, and could it affect humans?

Osterholm compared the situation to "Mad Cow" disease in the 1980s and 1990s in the United Kingdom, when there was public doubt that it could spread to humans. According to British news outlet the Independent, 156 people died in the U.K. in the 1990s due to "Mad Cow" disease.

No cases of CWD have been reported in humans, but studies have shown that it can be transmitted to animals other than deer, including primates, according to the CDC.

For humans, eating infected deer meat would be the most likely way for it to spread to people, the CDC says.

Estimates show that 7,000 to 15,000 animals infected with CWD are eaten each year and that number could rise by 20 percent annually, according to the the Alliance for Public Wildlife, which Osterholm cited in his testimony.

Scientists can't say for sure that CWD will cross over and infect humans but as time goes on and more infected meat is consumed, the likelihood increases, Osterholm said.

"It's like a throw at the genetic roulette table," he said.
021519-Chronic-wasting-disease-zombie-deer-US-counties
USA TODAY

CWD is a kind of illness known as prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

"If Steven King could write an infectious disease novel, he'd write it about prions," Osterholm told lawmakers.

In deer, CWD spreads through contaminated bodily fluids, tissue, drinking water and food, the CDC says.

The disease affects deer's brains and spinal cords through abnormal prion proteins that damage normal prion proteins, the CDC says. The cells collect and eventually burst, leaving behind microscopic empty spaces in the brain matter that give it a “spongy” look, according to the North Carolina Wildlife Commission.

Symptoms, which can take over a year to develop, include: "Drastic weight loss (wasting), stumbling, lack of coordination, listlessness, drooling, excessive thirst or urination, drooping ears, lack of fear of people, and aggression."

The disease was first identified in captive deer in the late 1960s in Colorado and in wild deer in 1981, the CDC said. According to the health agency, CWD could be more widespread than the believed 24 states.

"Once CWD is established in an area, the risk can remain for a long time in the environment. The affected areas are likely to continue to expand," the CDC says on its website.

However, many state regulations are in place aimed to prevent humans from eating the infected meat.

In North Carolina, anyone transporting cervid (animals from the deer family) carcass parts into the state must follow strict processing and packaging regulations. Indiana has already stepped up its monitoring efforts, though testing is not mandatory.

"If you put this into a meat processing plant ... this is kind of a worst case nightmare," Osterholm told lawmakers.

Osterholm says more needs to be done in the way of testing deer meat. While some states are testing, it needs to be done quicker and with a more robust infrastructure to prevent infected deer from being consumed, he said.

For hunters, the CDC recommends testing deer before eating their meat in affected areas. If a deer looks sick or acts strangely, hunters should not shoot or handle it or eat its meat, the health agency says.

Osterholm said hunters should keep hunting but be cautious and follow state regulations if they're in an affected area. "No one is asking anyone to stop hunting," he said.

"People have to understand the significance of this. We can't wait until we have the first cases coming," Osterholm told lawmakers.

Contributing: Karen Chávez, Sarah Bowman and Brett Molina USA TODAY Network


Published 11:16 AM EST Feb 16, 2019

Source:   https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2019/02/16/zombie-deer-chronic-wasting-disease-could-affect-humans/2882550002/
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
Back to Top
Newbie1A View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: January 26 2018
Location: Alberta
Status: Offline
Points: 80
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 08 2019 at 3:52pm
CRS, DrPH - I want to talk to you about this! About Johnes/Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium Avian specifically)...need input!
Back to Top
Newbie1A View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: January 26 2018
Location: Alberta
Status: Offline
Points: 80
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 08 2019 at 5:01pm
Originally posted by Newbie1A Newbie1A wrote:

CRS, DrPH - I want to talk to you about this! About Johnes/Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium Avian specifically)...need input!



Here is a iMedPub Journal on Tuberculosis - IF I'm understanding it correctly - it is the 'continual' thru all forms of TSE,CWD, etc etc As a complete layman with NO medical background this is a bit over my head...(understatement) but I'm dealing with testing on farm and see test is for "tuberculosis avian" (in sheep and goats!!!)and I have a tonne of birds on property - need knowledge/clarification! Can't figure out on here how to email/message a member privately... Study is 11 pages plus 2 pgs of references - please cut/paste below to your browsers if link doesn't work. Didn't want to try to cut/paste here and it has some interesting photo's

[URL=http://http://molecular-pathological-epidemiology.imedpub.com/cwd-tuberculosis-found-in-spongiformdisease-formerly-attributed-to-prions-itsimplication-towards-mad-cow-diseasescrapie-and-alzhei.php?aid=19116[/URL]
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down