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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

How H7N9 spread hard to know: CDC

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Albert View Drop Down
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    Posted: August 30 2013 at 8:38am
How H7N9 spread hard to know: CDC

How H7N9 avian influenza spread to humans is hard to know as it is a newly emerged infectious virus, said a researcher of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Thursday.

"The spread of H7N9 has not been completely stopped and the virus still exists in some poultry," Feng Zijian, an assistant to the CDC director, said during an online interview hosted by the National Health and Family Planning Commission.

The monitoring of H7N9 human infection should be stepped up in autumn, when flu can spread easily, so that effective measures can be taken immediately after infection was spotted, Feng said.

Poultry trade in infected areas should be restricted, and birds found infected with the virus should be culled, he said, adding that reducing human contact with poultry is a main way to control the spread of H7N9.

In areas where H7N9 previously spread, measures such as closing down poultry markets have been adopted, which effectively contained the avian flu, he added.

H7N9 bird flu has killed 45 people on the Chinese mainland since the first human infection was confirmed in late March. A total of 134 cases of H7N9 infection have been confirmed, according to the CDC.

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/807551.shtml#.UdBfCH_dNrM
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Albert View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Albert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 30 2013 at 8:51am
Originally posted by Albert Albert wrote:



"The spread of H7N9 has not been completely stopped and the virus still exists in some poultry," Feng Zijian, an assistant to the CDC director, said during an online interview hosted by the National Health and Family Planning Commission.




What do they mean it still exists in some poultry?  The Chinese and WHO haven't reported any findings of H7N9 in any poultry, or humans, and no culls, etc...  China is reporting absolutely nothing on H7N9 infections - anywhere.  If people think there haven't been any additional cases of h7 since the 135 reported cases, they're plain nuts. China will be exposed soon enough for their cover-up, which will reflect poorly on Chan and the WHO once again.

Lastly -- if all experts are warning that H7N9 will spread further when autumn arrives, wonder why the who is doing nothing about warning people since we only have approximately 30 - 45 days left.



 
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Kyle View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kyle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 30 2013 at 1:55pm
***** off ri***** No one is going to believe your bull***** you keep posting. It's spam and quite an annoyance.
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