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Hurricanes-appendix

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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Hurricanes-appendix
    Posted: September 23 2017 at 3:33am
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Atlantic_hurricane_season#Season_effects
damage (so far) 125.000 millions US$ (not only US)

damage 16.102,23  oct did see 1 cat 5, 1 cat 4

damage 730.4   oct  did see 1 cat 4

damage 233  oct did see 1 cat 4

damage 1510  

damage 77,909,948  oct 22-29 did see Sandy-cat 3

damage 18,485.4  oct did see 1 cat 4, 1 cat 3

damage 8,231.7  oct had 3 cat 2

damage 57.8   oct had 2 trop storms, nov had 1 cat 2

damage 47,099  oct and nov each had 1 cat 4

damage 3426.418 oct had 1 cat 1

damage 500 (beginning of) oct did see 1 cat 1

damage 158.916.7  oct had 1 cat 5 (Wilma) 1 cat 3

damage 57,370 beginning oct 1 cat 1

damage 4.400 (4.4 billion)

damage 2215

damage 11.400 (11.4 billion) oct had 1 cat 1 oct/nov 1 cat 4, nov/dec 2 cat 1

damage 1.296,5 oct had 1 cat 2

Que sera, sera, Whatever will be, will be, The future is not ours to see, Que sera, sera !
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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 24 2017 at 2:07am
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accumulated_cyclone_energy

The above list gives an indication of increase in damages. Also when you compare the beginning of the 21th century with present there is an increase in the spread of (stronger) storms. 

2000 hurricane season started june 7, ended oct 29 had 19 "systems" ACE 116
2001 start june 4, end dec 4  did have 17 systems ACE 106
2002 july 14 till oct 16 14 systems ACE 67
2003 ACE 175
2004 ACE 225
2005 ACE 250
2006 ACE 79
2007 ACE 72
2008 ACE 144
2009 ACE 53
2010 ACE 165
2011 ACE 126
2012 ACE 133
2013 start june 5 end dec 7 15 systems ACE 36
2014 start july 1 end oct 28 9 systems ACE 67
2015 start may 8 end nov 11 12 systems ACE 63
2016 start january 12 end nov 25 16 systems 141
2017 start april 19 so far 14 systems ACE so far 178

Que sera, sera, Whatever will be, will be, The future is not ours to see, Que sera, sera !
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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 24 2017 at 3:18am
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accumulated_cyclone_energy#Atlantic_hurricane_seasons.2C_1950.E2.80.932017

Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) is a measure used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to express the activity of individual tropical cyclones and entire tropical cyclone seasons, particularly the North Atlantic hurricane season. It uses an approximation of the wind energy used by a tropical system over its lifetime and is calculated every six hours. The ACE of a season is the sum of the ACEs for each storm and takes into account the number, strength, and duration of all the tropical storms in the season. The highest ACE calculated for a single storm is 82, for Hurricane/Typhoon Ioke in 2006
 
DJ-the list goes from 1950-2017 so 67 years. The highest ACE per year is 2005 with ACE=250
2017 is on 8th place but could become the #1 very likely. In the top 25 ACE list 10 years are 2000 or later. 

Que sera, sera, Whatever will be, will be, The future is not ours to see, Que sera, sera !
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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 08 2017 at 2:38am
https://www.vox.com/explainers/2017/9/18/16314440/disasters-are-getting-more-expensive-harvey-irma-insurance-climate

Estimates for the cost of Hurricane Harvey’s damage have come in at $65 billion$180 billion, and as high as $190 billion — the last of which would make it the costliest disaster in US history.

The numbers from the second record-breaking storm that hit the US this summer, Hurricane Irma, meanwhile, are still rolling in. But totals range from $50 billion to $100 billion.

To appreciate how staggering these figures are, consider that they could be enough to make the $18.57 trillion US economy lose a step, knocking between 0.6 percent and 0.8 percent off of US GDP growth this quarter, according to projections from investment banks.

Hurricanes keep costing more and more

Here’s one way to put the rising number of costly disasters in perspective: Nine of the 10 costliest Atlantic hurricanes (not including Harvey or Irma) have occurred since 2000.

The costliest hurricanes to strike the United States, as measured by insured losses Munich Re, Geo Risks Research

According to NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, the United States has suffered 212 weather and climate disasters since 1980 that have cost more than $1 billion, totaling $1.2 trillion. (You can see the trend in this great infographic from National Geographic.)

Que sera, sera, Whatever will be, will be, The future is not ours to see, Que sera, sera !
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CRS, DrPH View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CRS, DrPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 08 2017 at 8:35am
^VERY good work, DutchJosh! 

All of this hurricane energy is clearly related to increasing global temperatures of the oceans. 

Hurricane season isn't over yet by the way!  

Be safe, Chuck
CRS, DrPH
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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 08 2017 at 10:12pm
Thank you, CRS, DrPH

http://cci-reanalyzer.org/wx/fcst/#GFS-025deg.WORLD-CED.T2_anom-MSLP hurricanes/depressions do not stop at the Atlantic, they move further to Europe, Arctic bringing above average temperatures often, rain etc. 




The Atlantic hurricane season is quite extreme, the Pacific season is not. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Pacific_hurricane_season Statistics may provide some proof for abrupt climate change. So far the info-for me-is not that clear. Still-abrupt climate change, going exponential-could bring changes that fast we find us on a global Titanic. Maybe there is still some time for us humans to limit the damage ?
Que sera, sera, Whatever will be, will be, The future is not ours to see, Que sera, sera !
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