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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Now tracking the Aussie Flu.

In Home Hospital-How to keep house safe!!

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Trigger View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Trigger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: In Home Hospital-How to keep house safe!!
    Posted: March 01 2006 at 12:56pm

I would really like to knkow what everyone intends on doing if someone in there home becomes ill.

How will you make your room safe so the virus does not escape to the rest of the house?

How will you keep positive airflow without electricity?

Does a heavy mil plastic or tarp help if you hang it over the door to your sick room.

How do you decontaminate properly in the same room if you have one side as dirty and on side as clean?  Will a plastic tarp or heavy mil seperator work?

Comments, questions and good advice are always welcome.  I've read a lot but still am not convinced that a room in the house is a good idea.

Do you have a place to quarantine new family members who may be late the entering the house?

So many questions and so little time if this continues the way it is going.

  What should I do if my diabetic step daughter comes down with ketoacidosis?  She always has to go to the hospital for IV fluid.  I cannot provide that at home.  We are not healthcare professionals. 

THANKS

Trigger
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 01 2006 at 2:11pm

Trigger,

You may want to have this person wear protective clothing (disposable scrubs) and a mask to reduce contamination. This clothing should be changed and disposed of daily. It will be difficult to contain viral contamination. The H5 patient will have a runny nose, nose bleeds, conjunctivitis (pink eye), severe coughing, chest congestion, pneumonia and bloody diarrhea 

The H5 ill person could be very sick for weeks. The best bet is to get them into a hospital so IV's can be run and have access to Oxygen.

There is no guarantee that the patient will survive even with Intensive Care. The current fatality rate is 55%. Also, the hospitals will be under-staffed and supplies will be few.

Even if others in your family are exposed to H5 virus, it doesn't automatically mean they will become ill. The current rate is 30% of exposed become ill.

There is no good answer to this problem.

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote outsidethecamp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2006 at 8:20am
We are very blessed in that we have a small "mother-in-law" hse. on our property that we have all set up to house the sick in, if needed.

(Currently, my daughter is using it for her photography studio.)

It's heated with electric baseboard heaters only, so, in the event that we lose power, we've purchased a small propane heater (enough to keep the bdrm. warm).

We've also stocked the closets with heavy mil plastic sheeting, extra bedding (including rubber sheets), gloves, gowns, masks, goggles, paper towels, tp, porta-potty,  garbage bags, keroscene lamps, wicks, & fuel, etc...&, of course, tons of antibacterial lotions, sprays, lysol, & so on. 

We're not medical professionals, so about all that we'll be really able to do is try to keep the ill family member as comfortable as possible.   We also have some heavy duty pain medications we could use if we had to.

If anybody can think of things we may have forgotten to include in the "sick hse." please advise.  I know Tamiflu would be nice to have on hand, but at this point, we don't have any.

I really pray that we won't need to utilize the little hse., but just in case...we've got it set up.

God help us all...
Peggy in MN




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2006 at 8:42am
Hi. I bought a cabin looking tent at Kmart which sort of looks home like. And have camping equipment to use as a makeshift hospital either in the back yoar or a smaller tent for gararge use if necessary..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2006 at 3:44pm
Peggy, you might want to get some hot water bottles. They are wonderful!! Nothing better for a patient with the chills or for you when you crawl into an otherwise cold bed. You can find them in most grocery stores for arounfd $6. gotta say, I envy you your little hospital.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote outsidethecamp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2006 at 5:46pm
Thanks Femvet!

Never even thought of this...Will add hot h2o bottles to our cashe. 

Like I said, we ARE very BLESSED.  We never even were looking for a rural property, let alone, one with a mother-in-law hse. on it.  God just provided, as HE always does.

God is what happens when we're making other plans.

By the way, I've REALLY enjoyed your posts.  Such a wise individual with such a wealth of info. to provide for all of us. 

Thank you FemVet!  Be Safe.

God help us all...
Peggy in MN


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2006 at 6:33pm

Thank you, you're too nice. but me and wise, now that's a hoot. Loose as a goose is more like it.

By the way, since you have the hospital, you may need walkie-talkies. Will cut down on the going in and out.

I'm still trying to figure out our own situation as far as a sick-room. It will have to be one of the bedrooms, I think. The only other option would be the garage, but it gets incredibly hot here in the summer and way too cold in the winter.

It's just the two of us plus my cats, but they are in a separate room. If my husband gets sick, his survival chance is next to nil. Bad heart. I think once TSHTF, I will just force him to stay home.

Like you said:

God is what happens while we're making plans.    Or

God laughs while we're making plans

Take care

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mississipp Mama Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 07 2006 at 8:45pm
 Hi peggy I love your post, thank for the idea of a small hospital.  I have a large wooden storage shed that I started turning into a guest room last year.  I couldn't complete it because we got hit by katrina.  I sure hope we have enough time to get it finished and stocked.  Still cleaning up from katrina.  I sure will put this at the top of my list when i get my place finished and the preps done.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote outsidethecamp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 07 2006 at 9:08pm
Hello Mississippi Mama...

Man, what strength you must have, lady!!!

I have never been tested as, I'm sure you have in the past year!!!

You're a survivor, I'm convinced!!!

I think that your idea of utilizing the lg. wooden storage shed as a hosp. is a very good one!

Any place that you can isolate the sick from the healthy will be good.

I will honestly pray for you & yours.

I know that you've been thru more than any of us here already.

Stay strong dear lady...

God help us alll...
Peggy in MN


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mississipp Mama Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 11 2006 at 10:11pm
    Hi Peggy, thanks for the encouraging words.   I do get really tired at times, so what i do is step back a day or two, relax which means putting plans on paper but no physical work,exhale and start all over again.  I will be glad when we all can slow down a little and catch up on our rest.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amethyst Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2006 at 3:34pm
Considering that I'm the only person in my home, I don't intend on going out and infecting other people if I get sick.  If I were deathly ill, obviously I'd call 911.  But if no hospitals were open, and I had no other recourse, I'd stay put.  Better not to infect others.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TERMS 1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2006 at 3:56pm

I work for 911 and can pretty much tell you that you won't be going to a hospital when TSHTF.  The will be setting up ACC's (Acute Care Centers) and anyone with flu like symptoms will be shuttled there.  These will be in auditoriums and gymnasiums, staffed with a couple of medical folks (they hope).  The logistics for such a setup have to be insurmountable.  You'll need medical supplies, body bags, food, water, linens and a place for the staff that will most likely be quarantined "in place".  I've seen paper work that the regular hospitals will have a "Flu Triage" set up outside the ER doors to evaluate ALL incoming patients.  Hospitals will still have to deal with babies being born, traumatic injuries, medical conditions and the "normal stuff".  Then there is the real possibility of acquiring a nosocomial infection (a hospitals little gift to you), that could be worse than what you went there for in the first place. 

My county is planning its annual disaster drill (FD, EMS & Hospitals are ALL required to participate) for August of this year and its already been said that it will be a "pandemic event".  The drill will probably come 2 or 3 months to late, but hey thats governmental planning for you.

Credibility is like virginity, once it is gone- it is gone forever.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 20 2006 at 2:29am

"I would really like to knkow what everyone intends on
doing if someone in there home becomes ill.

How will you make your room safe so the virus does not escape to the
rest of the house?"


--------------



http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/resources/pressrel/announceme nts/
113004wkshp/pdfs/Presentation%2009_Sergey%20Grinshpun.pdf

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 20 2006 at 2:30am


by Sergey Grinshpun, PhD
Center for Health-Related Aerosol Studies, University of Cincinnati

Workshop on Respiratory Protection for Airborne Infectious Agents
November 30 - December 1, 2004 Atlanta, GA

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/resources/pressrel/announceme nts/
113004wkshp/pdfs/Presentation%2009_Sergey%20Grinshpun.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/resources/pressrel/announceme nts/
113004wkshp/presentations.html


Department of Environmental Health, Center for Health-Related Aerosol
Studies, University of Cincinnati,
P.O. Box 670056, 3223 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056, USA


Abstract: We developed a novel concept that allows to considerably
improve the performance of conventionally used filtering-facepiece
respirators against fine and ultra fine aerosols including airborne viral
and
bacterial agents.

The concept is based on the continuous emission of unipolar ions. The e
ect was evaluated through the real-time monitoring of the concentration
and size distribution of ne and ultra ne aerosol particles. The
measurements were conducted inside and outside of a respiratory mask
that was face sealed on a breathing manikin.

A commonly used Type N95 respirator and surgical mask were utilized
for the tests. The manikin was placed in a 24.3-m3 indoor test chamber
and exposed to polydisperse surrogate aerosols simulating viral
and bacterial particles with respect to the aerodynamic size. The particle
penetration through the mask was found to decrease by one-to-two
orders of magnitude as a result of continuous unipolar ion emission in
the chamber. The ux of air ions migrated to the breathing zone and
imparted electrical charges of the same polarity to the aerosol particles
and the respirator lter surface. This created an electrostatic shield along
the external surface of the filter, thus enhancing the protection
characteristics provided by the respirator.

The above performance enhancement e ect is crucial for minimizing the
infectious risk in the cases when the conventional ltering-facepiece
respirators are not able to provide an adequate protection against
airborne viruses and bacteria.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2006 at 2:48pm
Originally posted by Trigger Trigger wrote:

How will you make your room safe so the virus does not escape to the rest of the house?

Only one person should go into the sick room, with the best personal protective equipment you have.  The next thing you can do to keep most viruses out of the rest of the house, is to have a window fan continuously venting that room's air to the outside of the house, with plastic or other sealing material around the fan, so the room will draw fresh air into that room from the other rooms of the house.
Seal off the return air vent back to the furnace if there is one.  So all viruses exit the window, and replacement air comes from the doorway or the furnace vent.  If possible set the furnace vent during the heating season so that the fan is on continuously, or put a light plastic flap over the vent so air can blow in, but when the furnace is off, the plastic covers the vent.
 
The entry door ideally should be a double door so you have an alcove you are entering before you open the door to the room.  Otherwise rig up a plastic curtain floor to ceiling around the outside of the door, so that when you open the door to the room, little air escapes the room, and of course the fan is also helping to prevent that by pulling air from the house into the room.  Possibly in this alcove you could also have a UV light to kill viruses.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2006 at 8:06pm
Is it a good idea to save antibiotic eye drops we have now for conjunctivtus? thanks
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ImmuneConcerned Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 21 2006 at 1:22am

Sick room  supply suggestion - I bought a couple extra (not sure of correct word) turkey basting syringes and electrolytes to mix with water (or sugar & salt to mix with water) as keeping hydrated very important.   

Wondering if Hydrogen Peroxide could be used for eyes if one doesn't have antibiotic eye drops. . . ?
 
I need to find disposable outer protective clothes.  Have been indenting to buy lots of t-shirts & sweats that could be discarded or bleached.
 
Our sick room will be a room previously added on & includes a bathroom with shower, windows on 3 sides and exterior door.   Thinking of sealing it off from rest of house with only entrance from outside house.   However, winters can be cold & springs wet & cleaning up before returning to the other side of the house may be problematic.  Privacy can easily be arranged with some tarps by a hose, but figuring out how to assure sufficient warmth outside problematic--writing this helped:  we have an outdoor propane heater. . . just hope the water in the hose doesn't freeze. 
 
Haven't worked up the courage to discuss possibility of DH or traveling college student daughter using designated sick room if/when DH goes in to work or when DD returns from college & travels.  I've seen incubation times stated to be over two weeks and as short as 3-5.  . . . ?   Hope I don't have to deal with illness, and comings & goings at the same time.
ImmuneConcerned
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 21 2006 at 10:39am
immuneconcerned,
You can not use peroxide for eyes!!!!
 
Why are you rubbing your eyes so hard and your wife too!!!!!!!!
Better go to doc now and see if you can get an antibiotic for it. Who had pink eye recently?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rocky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 21 2006 at 12:49pm
Sounds like you are coming up with good ideas. Would some heat tape on the hose or at the spigot prevent freezing? For protective clothing I will probably use old T shirts and at a second hand shop I bought some medium weight pants that will take bleaching for a while. I think sweat pants and/or sweat shirts would be too hot. Here it gets 90's in summer (no a.c.) and -10 to -20 in winter. But i would think a heated hospital type room would need to be kept on the warm side. Also got some inexpensive surgical bottoms. Try allheart.com. I found lots of things there that i felt might be important to have (head covers, shoe covers, etc)

Wish we had a separate room. We live in a country type dwelling with no rooms with doors. Everything is open (excpept bathroom and a room where all my food supplies are kept)

If anyone has any ideas of how to make a space that can somehow be isolated from inside living areas for every one else with heavy guage plastic, etc, please let me know. Upstairs loft (400 sq ft) has on one end our queen size bed and on the other side, office area. All one big area. Open stairs lead down to the main living area (1000 sq ft), all an open area with bathroom, eating area, kitchen, living room and more office area. No doors except to the bathroom and food storage room

Well, we wanted open space so that is what we built. Oh for a guest bedroom or something similar. But no can do!

If turkey baster is too large, maybe an idea would be picking up a few eye droppers. They come in handy for a variety of uses and are very inexpensive.

I have been prepping with only summer in mind. Now we need to expand to winter thoughts. Our 2 outdoor solar showers won't seem very appealing and you are right, we always turn off the outside water spigots because they freeze and break. Hoses are stored in a protected area.

I think a new TOPIC is needed discussing winter (cold climate) topics in relation to hygiene, disinfecting, sick care, outoor duties, outdoor animal care etc, with winter in mind.


We have 2 large tents were going to house (at first) quarantine members, and then would house parts of the family. Outdoor covered/screened shelter will be of little use (we bought for that purpose). putting up partly covered dog kennel for family dogs but will have to figure out warmth since they will NOT be going into the house.

OH my. I come up with a little suggestion and in turn crank out more questions. Rocky

Originally posted by ImmuneConcerned ImmuneConcerned wrote:

<FONT style=": #222222">Sick room  supply suggestion - I bought a couple extra (not sure of correct word) turkey basting syringes and electrolytes to mix with water (or sugar & salt to mix with water) as keeping hydrated very important.   



Wondering if Hydrogen Peroxide could be used for eyes if one doesn't have antibiotic eye drops. . . ?
 





I need to find disposable outer protective clothes.  Have been indenting to buy lots of t-shirts & sweats that could be discarded or bleached.

 

Our sick room will be a room previously added on & includes a bathroom with shower, windows on 3 sides and exterior door.   Thinking of sealing it off from rest of house with only entrance from outside house.   However, winters can be cold & springs wet & cleaning up before returning to the other side of the house may be problematic.  Privacy can easily be arranged with some tarps by a hose, but figuring out how to assure sufficient warmth outside problematic--writing this helped:  we have an outdoor propane heater. . . just hope the water in the hose doesn't freeze. 

 

Haven't worked up the courage to discuss possibility of DH or traveling college student daughter using designated sick room if/when DH goes in to work or when DD returns from college & travels.  I've seen incubation times stated to be over two weeks and as short as 3-5.  . . . ?   Hope I don't have to deal with illness, and comings & goings at the same time.

    
Prepare for the Unexpected!
Rocky
http://www.homeemergencyusa.com
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jennie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 24 2008 at 11:24pm
i was hoping somebody could tell what i should do my little girl shes 2 i belive she has conjunctivitus her eyes are all full of goo i wipe it but it keeps coming back please help some advice please
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