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Monkeypox in the UK

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    Posted: September 08 2018 at 2:54pm
Monkeypox warning as the first ever case of the potentially fatal disease is reported in the UK

The victim is believed to have contracted the infection from their homeland of Nigeria, before travelling to the UK last week

A warning has been issued over monkeypox after a person in Cornwall has been diagnosed with the rare, potentially fatal disease.

The victim is currently receiving specialist medical care in hospital for the viral infection that can be transmitted to humans from animals, such as rodents and primates.

It is the first time ever this infection has been diagnosed in the UK, Public Health England (PHE) said.

The patient, whose gender has not been revealed, was staying at a naval base in Cornwall where they became ill.

They were then transferred to the expert infectious disease unit at the Royal Free Hospital, London, and are believed to be undergoing an incubation period.

The victim is thought to have contracted the infection from their homeland of Nigeria, before travelling to the UK last week.

As a precautionary measure, people who might have been in close contact with the individual are being contacted by experts and the NHS.

This includes a number of passengers who travelled in close proximity to the patient on the same flight to London from Nigeria on Sunday, September 7.

Monkeypox is a rare viral infection that does not spread easily between people. It is usually a mild self-limiting illness and most people recover within a few weeks.

However, severe illness can occur in some individuals.

The infection can be spread when someone is in close contact with an infected person; however there is a very low risk of transmission to the general population.

People without symptoms are not considered infectious but, as a precaution, those who have been in close proximity are being contacted to ensure that if they do become unwell they can be treated quickly.

If passengers are not contacted then there is no action they should take.

Initial symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion.

A rash can develop, often beginning on the face, then spreading to other parts of the body. The rash changes and goes through different stages before finally forming a scab, which later falls off.

Dr Michael Jacobs, clinical director of infection at the Royal Free Hospital, said: “Monkeypox is, in most cases, a mild condition which will resolve on its own and have no long-term effects on a person’s health. Most people recover within several weeks.

“It is a rare disease caused by monkeypox virus, and has been reported mainly in central and west African countries.

“It does not spread easily between people and the risk of transmission to the wider public is very low. We are using strict isolation procedures in hospital to protect our staff and patients.”

Dr Nick Phin, Deputy Director, National Infection Service at PHE, said: “It is important to emphasise that monkeypox does not spread easily between people and the overall risk to the general public is very low.

“Public Health England is following up those who have had close contact with the patient to offer advice and to monitor them as necessary.

“PHE and the NHS have well established and robust infection control procedures for dealing with cases of imported infectious disease and these will be strictly followed to minimise the risk of transmission.”

What is monkeypox?

Monkeypox is a rare viral infection that can be transmitted to humans from animals.

It primarily occurs in remote parts of central and west Africa, near tropical rainforests.

In Africa human infections have been documented through the handling of infected monkeys, Gambian giant rats and squirrels, with rodents being the most likely reservoir of the virus. Eating inadequately cooked meat of infected animals is a possible risk factor.
Is it contagious?

It does not spread easily between people.

The infection can be spread when someone is in close contact with an infected person; however there is a very low risk of transmission to the general population.

The incubation period is usually from 6 to 16 days but can range from 5 to 21 days.
What are the symptoms?

Initial symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion.

A rash may develop on the face before spreading to other parts of the body.

Can it be fatal?

Monkeypox infection is usually a mild illness and most people recover within several weeks. However, severe illness can occur in some individuals.

But in some cases it can be fatal.
What is the treatment?

There are no specific treatments or vaccines available for monkeypox infection, but outbreaks can be controlled.

Source:   [url]https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/monkeypox-warning-patient-diagnosed-potentially-13212966[url
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[sie=4]Monkeypox UK outbreak: Second case confirmed - what symptoms to look out for

UPDATED: 20:30, Tue, Sep 11, 2018
MONKEYPOX is a rare viral infection which can begin with a fever and headache and develop into a rash. But while most people recover within weeks, it can cause severe illness and can have deadly consequences.
By Katrina Turrill

Monkeypox case number two has been confirmed in the UK, with a second individual diagnosed in England.

A patient was diagnosed with the illness last week in Cornwall and is currently receiving care at the Royal Free in London. But Public Health England (PHE) has said there no link between the two cases.

The patient in this second case is believed to have contracted the disease in Nigeria before travelling to the UK.

The second patient first presented at Blackpool Victoria Hospital and following a positive test result was transferred to Royal Liverpool University Hospital, an expert respiratory infectious disease centre, where they are now receiving appropriate care.

Monkeypox is a rare viral infection that does not spread easily between people. It is usually a mild self-limiting illness.

Dr Nick Phin, Deputy Director, National Infection Service at PHE: “We know that in September 2017 Nigeria experienced a large sustained outbreak of monkeypox and since then sporadic cases have continued to be reported.

“It is likely that monkeypox continues to circulate in Nigeria and could therefore affect travellers who are returning from this part of the world, however, it is very unusual to see two cases in such a relatively short space of time.

“We are working hard to contact individuals, including healthcare workers, that might have come into contact with the individual to provide information and health advice.”

Dr Mike Beadsworth, Clinical Director of the Tropical and Infectious Diseases Unit added: “We are treating a patient who has tested positive for monkeypox. The patient is being cared for on our specialist infectious and tropical diseases unit, by highly trained staff who are experienced in dealing with a variety of infectious diseases.

“All necessary precautions are being taken by specialist staff and there is currently no risk to other staff, patients or visitors.

“We ask that people continue to use our services as normal and that people only come to our emergency department if their condition is serious and/or an emergency.”

The first monkeypox patient was staying in a naval base in Cornwall, before being taken to hospital.

They are a resident of Nigeria, and it’s believed they contracted the infection before travelling to the UK.

PHE and the NHS are contacting individuals who may have been in close contact with the patient, as monkeypox can be spread by human-to-human contact.

So what are the symptoms of monkeypox you should be looking out for?
Initial symptoms of the infection include fever, headache, aching muscles, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion.

A rash can also develop, usually starting on the face before spreading to other parts of the body, such as the hands and soles of the feet.

Often the rash develops into vesicles, which are small, fluid-filled blisters. These can become crusty and tend to fall off the skin in around 10 days.

The World Health Organization says it may take up to three weeks for the crusts to completely disappear.

The virus is usually spread via infected animals, but the best way to avoid it is to regularly wash your hands.

Source and video:    https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1016115/monkeypox-virus-outbreak-second-case-uk-symptoms-signs
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