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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic.

Mumps- Eyewitnesses Please

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lutosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 16 2006 at 1:17pm
Case of mumps is confirmed in city
By the Daily Times staff

Another case of the mumps was confirmed by the Dodge County Human Services and Health Department, bringing the total number of cases to four, according to Jody Langfeldt, public health officer.

One of those confirmed cases is in Watertown and there are also two suspected cases in the city, said Watertown Public Health Officer Carol Quest.

The county is currently awaiting information from the state, Langfeldt said.

“They (the state) are apparently having some questions about some of their testing,” Langfeldt said. “We are waiting to get guidance from the state as far as what will be the next steps,” the public health official said.

Because of these questions and the potential for an enormous outbreak in the state, Quest said the city is treating any suspected case as if it were confirmed.

“If we have a suspected case we treat it as though it is a confirmed case,” Quest said. “It may take a little bit of time for the confirmatory lab work to come through, so we treat them as though they are a case.”

“I would like to say we have it nipped, but one can never tell,” Langfeldt said. “We have been dealing with the mumps for some time,” she added. “I am not sure it will go away overnight.”


Quest said the number of confirmed cases varies across the state and because people travel, Wisconsin could experience the same number of outbreaks that Iowa has.

The Iowa Department of Public Health reported last week the state has seen a total of 1,674 confirmed, probable and suspect cases of mumps.
Of those cases, 1,184 of them have been confirmed.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, the state has had 185 confirmed cases as of this morning. Dodge County reported its first confirmed case of mumps late last month and confirmed two more cases in early May. The state confirmed the first diagnosis of the infection on March 20 in Grant County.

Watertown Unified School District nurse Janice Rambo, school
administrators and Quest met this morning and decided to require proof of mumps immunization records of all school district employees.

All employees and staff will be asked to show proof of a mumps vaccination, a blood test showing they are immune or they will be asked to receive the vaccination.

“We want to be proactive and make sure that we're not contributing to the spread of mumps,” Rambo said. “If just one adult working with the children has the mumps it could easily spread to the children.”

Rambo said the Centers for Disease Control has recommended that all adults working with children or the elderly show proof of vaccination for mumps or receive the vaccination. The recommendation includes those working in a hospital, preschool, school and child care center.

School staff have never been required to show proof of vaccinations prior to this new policy. Children generally receive the vaccination before entering kindergarten and are required to show proof. New students entering the district are also required to show immunization records. Some parents sign a waiver deciding not to have their child immunized.

“Those parents with students who have not received various vaccinations should know that if there is an outbreak in the school district those students many need to stay home from school for a lengthy period of time,” Rambo said. “Most students are already immunized.”

Rambo said the district is looking to create a new policy requiring immunization records for teachers and staff as part of a pre-employment process. The district has already sent a letter home to parents describing the symptoms of mumps and how to watch for it.

“Parents should make sure to keep students home from school if they think they are ill,” Rambo said. “Also, adults should stay home from work if they are ill. Mumps can be spread easily.”

“We still need to continue to be alert and watch for symptoms,” Langfeldt added.

The symptoms include a low grade fever, headache, muscle pain and a general feeling of discomfort. Commonly one or both sides of the face in the cheek and jaw area become swollen within the first two days of the illness. Most individuals that become ill with mumps recover without problems, but some individuals can develop complications including meningitis, encephalitis, deafness and death.

Mumps is an acute viral infection that is spread from person to person mostly by coughing or sneezing. Infected people start to show signs of mumps two to three weeks after they are exposed to an infection. Infected people can spread the disease from three days before the onset of symptoms to the fourth day after symptoms begin. There have been cases of the mumps virus being detected for as along as nine days after the onset of the symptoms.

It is recommended that a mumps, measles and rubella vaccine be given in two doses when children are 12 to 15 months old and once again at 4 to 6 years of age.

Those likely to have immunity against mumps are people who have received at least one dose of the vaccine, were born before 1957 or have already had the infection.

http://www.wdtimes.com/articles/2006/05/16/news/news3.txt
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lutosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 9:43am

 
Wednesday, May 17, 2006 :::
 
Kansas Mumps Cases Reach Total of 601
The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has received reports of 601 mumps (confirmed/probable) cases in 60 Kansas counties as of Monday, May 15.
 
 
Topeka, Kan. - infoZine - The majority of the cases are concentrated in Douglas County (226 as of May 15), but there are also cases in Allen, Anderson, Atchison, Barton, Bourbon, Brown, Butler, Chase, Clay, Cowley, Crawford, Dickinson, Edwards, Ellis, Finney, Ford, Franklin, Geary, Gove, Grant, Greenwood, Harvey, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, Kearny, Kingman, Labette, Leavenworth, Lincoln, Lyon, Marion, Marshall, McPherson, Miami, Mitchell, Montgomery, Nemaha, Norton, Osage, Osborne, Phillips, Pottawatomie, Pratt, Rawlins, Reno, Riley, Rooks, Saline, Scott, Sedgwick, Seward, Shawnee, Sheridan, Sherman, Thomas, Wabaunsee, Wichita and Wyandotte counties.

For more detailed information about mumps cases in Kansas, please visit the KDHE Web site at
www.kdheks.gov/immunize/mumps.html. The most recent KDHE report on mumps cases by county may be downloaded from that Web page.

Iowa health officials have reported 1,674 cases of mumps as of May 10.
http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/15098/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 10:28am
May 2006
The Minnesota Department of Health has confirmed 11 mumps cases in Minnesota in 2006. Four of the 11 cases may be linked to Iowa.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 10:30am
 
As of May 15, 2006, Nebraska health care providers reported 291 confirmed, probable, and suspected mumps cases in 45 counties to HHSS and local health departments.

Total Cases: 291

Total Counties: 45

Case Breakdown:

  • Confirmed 67
  • Probable 200
  • Suspect 24

***Confirmed and probable cases both have classic symptoms of mumps. Cases are confirmed if a person has classic symptoms and was either exposed to mumps or has a positive lab test. Probable cases have the classic symptoms only. In an outbreak situation, probable cases are considered real cases whether confirmed or not.

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This is still the latest from Arkansas no new update
 
May 2, 2006

Little Rock -- The Arkansas Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Health (DOH), is reporting a confirmed case of mumps in Clark County. The Division had reported a confirmed case in White County earlier. 

Contacts of these patients will be notified and immunization records assessed to determine if additional doses of mumps, measles, rubella vaccine (MMR) are needed. Neither of the patients have had any known contact with any cases from Iowa and other states affected by the recent mumps epidemic in the Midwest. Nor have these patients been exposed to the infected individual that was on American Airlines Flight 3617 that landed at the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport on April 2, 2006.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 10:52am
Wisconsin reports 185 confirmed cases of mumps as of 5/17/06
 
Here's the link:
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The number of mumps cases reported this year in Illinois is on the upswing. The state has averaged 13 cases over the past five years, but as of May 16 the Illinois Department of Public Health has recorded 326 cases in 2006. Mumps have been reported in 56 Illinois counties and the city of Chicago. This Web site will be updated each Tuesday and Thursday with the latest mumps totals by county and state. Illinois Mumps Cases by County - 2006
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 11:04am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 11:29am
 
05/16/2006

Mumps: Phase 3




More cases of the mumps are prompting the South Dakota Department of Health to expand vaccine clinics.

So far, state health officials have given more than two-thousand vaccines against the mumps, largely to students and staff at the state's colleges and universities. In what's being called "phase 3" of the state's plan, Secretary of Health, Doneen Hollingsworth says as many as 18-thousand, five hundred doses of the vaccine are now available to three more groups. They include faculty and staff at all K through 12 schools in the state, as well as residents and staff at South Dakota's Adjustment Training Centers, and daycare providers throughout the state.

According to the Department of Health's latest figures, there are now 35 confirmed cases of the mumps in South Dakota, along with 62 probable cases of the disease. Another 13 cases are suspected. Forty-four percent of the state is now dealing with the mumps, with the highest count in Minnehaha County where 22 cases have been reported. In addition to those numbers disease detectives have been working with almost 13-hundred people in the state who have been in direct contact with someone infected by mumps.

South Dakota State Epidemiologist, Dr. Lon Kightlinger, PhD, “When mumps was an epidemic disease in the United States, and that was 50 years ago, there was a distinct seasonality between the spring and summer months. It just faded away due to the season change. We don't know if that will happen this year, but we're certainly hopeful of that, too."

At this point, it's too early to tell if that will happen, but Iowa's cases have been dropping since late April.

South Dakota's numbers are no where near Iowa's, but they're still high enough to make health officials here uneasy. Nearly half the counties in the state are now reporting mumps, an estimated 110 confirmed, probable or suspected cases. Another 1300 people have been exposed to the disease but unlike Iowa, most of those being hit are school-age students, not those in college.

The Midwest mumps outbreak may have began in an Iowa university lecture hall, but it's now spreading through South Dakota classrooms. South Dakota State Epidemiologist, Lon Kightlinger, PhD says "It's probably too soon to say how this is going to play out, but right now they're mostly in the southeast. But as we can see, there's no geographical immunity, so to speak, for mumps."

Now that the mumps vaccine has been made available to college students & staff who want it, health officials are expanding the vaccine's reach, making it available to all faculty and staff at K-12 schools in the state; to residents and staff at South Dakota's Adjustment Training Centers; and to all daycare providers. Doneen Hollingsworth, secretary of South Dakota's Department of Health says, "The thought here is that vaccinating the childcare providers will help to protect our young children who have yet to receive a second dose of MMR because it's not age-appropriate for them."

Officials in Pierre are not worried about vaccine supply: All tolled 25-thousand extra doses will be available for those willing to roll up their sleeves. Mary Lerssen, with the Sioux Falls School District says, "We'll probably follow like our flu vaccine protocol where we have it here at the Instructional Planning Center. We have good parking, people know where it is, easy in and out access and it requires limited staff, administration-wise." Doneen Hollingsworth adds, "our target is to have the schools done in the next two weeks and the adjustment training centers and childcare to be done by about the first week of June."

The South Dakota Department of Health has set up a hotline where you can check your own vaccine status, there's also a list of vaccine clinic locations and times on their website.

SD DOH Hotline
1-800-738-2301 (8am-5pm)

SD DOH on mumps





Jaine Andrews
© 2006 KELOLAND TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lutosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 11:56am
This is dated May 7th
Two Mumps Cases Confirmed in Kentucky

Mumps has now been confirmed in Kentucky.

According to a Paducah doctor, two people in western Kentucky have the disease. The doctor says both people were immunized as children.

Despite the new cases, he says most people who have been vaccinated should be safe. Mumps mainly affects people who have low immune systems.

The Fayette County Health Department says it still doesn't have test results back on a possible mumps case here in Lexington.

We should have that information by the first of next week.

http://www.wkyt.com/Global/story.asp?S=4866884
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lutosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 12:00pm
May 17, 2006
OREGON

Mumps Update

Eugene -

Laboratory tests have confirmed two more cases of mumps in Lane County.  Lane County Public Health (LCPH) is continuing the epidemiologic investigation. One of the two cases is in a worker at the same hospital as the first identified case, McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center, and has a similar onset date of illness. Infection control leaders at the hospital, in consultation with LCPH, have taken immediate steps to protect both patients and hospital staff. The second case is in a U of O student. University health staff is working closely with LCPH on prevention and control efforts.

Mumps is a viral infection of the salivary glands that is spread by coughing or sneezing.  Symptoms are fever, headache, muscle aches, sore throat, and swelling of the glands close to the jaw.  The symptoms can be mild in some people and may not include the classic swollen glands under the jaw appearance that is commonly associated with mumps. A mild and unidentified case may allow the inadvertent spread of the illness to others.  Complications of mumps illness can include deafness, inflammation of the testicles and ovaries, and, in uncommon situations, meningitis and encephalitis.

A history of having the illness usually confirms life long immunity.  Other effective protection includes a full immunization series as well as essential hygiene measures – cover your cough, stay home if you are sick, and wash your hands.

In recent mumps outbreaks, some people with a complete immunization history have still acquired Mumps.

“Two valid doses of mumps vaccination will protect 90 percent of the people from acquiring the illness,” said Martha deBroekert, a communicable disease and immunization nurse with Lane County Public Health. 

All children, without medical contraindications, ages one through 18 are advised to have two doses of “MMR”  - Measles, Mumps, Rubella vaccination.  Mumps vaccine is given as a triple antigen and is a live virus.  People working in a health care setting are advised to receive two doses of MMR vaccine if they do not have a history of disease. Other adults in other specific situations also need vaccine.  Consult your health care provider, college or university, or LCPH for further information.

LCPH is in consultation with the state regarding the outbreak investigation.  Mumps has not been a reportable disease in Oregon since 1981, although sporadic cases have probably occurred.  Because Mumps outbreaks have occurred in other places in the country and world this year, county and state public health as well as the CDC are interested in the current Mumps cases. 

Text and information provided by Lane County Public Health
http://www2.kval.com/x56543.xml

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 12:47pm
Hey thanks for the correction on Kentucky, LuTosh.  I got that information from the Kentucky Dept of Health website.  Thank you for helping me get it right.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 1:21pm
A few days late, I saw it today:

http://www.wvec.com/news/health/stories/wvec_medical_050506_va_mumps_.11742af9.html

Nine cases of mumps reported in Virginia
05:33 PM EDT on Friday, May 5, 2006

By Dottie Wikan, WVEC.com

Nine Virginians have come down with the mumps so far this year.

That's the most reported in the state since 2004, when 11 people were infected.

According to Shannon Marshall with the Va. Department of Health, "None of the cases appears to be related to the Midwest outbreak, or to each another."

She also told WVEC.com the people weren't hospitalized and they range in age from two to 44.

The cases were spread across the state, she added.

11 cases of mumps were reported to the CDC in 2000. Only one case was reported in 2003.

The mumps virus is spread by coughing and sneezing. The most common symptoms are fever, headache and swollen glands under the jaw.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 1:30pm
Originally posted by grace grace wrote:



According to Shannon Marshall with the Va. Department of Health, "None of the cases appears to be related to the Midwest outbreak, or to each another."



I wonder how they can say that. They could be related to the Midwest outbreak, they have only 2 reported cases for the whole of 2005.


I went to the VA Department of Health and got these statistics:

http://www.vdh.state.va.us/pdf/MumpsStatistics.pdf

Summary of National and State Mumps Reported Morbidity

As of May 12, Virginia has reported 23 mumps cases to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 2006.


        2000      2001      2002      2003     2004     2005
National 338      266      270      231      258      293
Virginia 11        8        5        1       11        2



Here they talk about 23 cases for this year.







    
    
    
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lutosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 11:47am

UD student diagnosed with mumps

2:18 p.m., May 18, 2006--On May 17, a 20-year-old University of Delaware student was clinically diagnosed with mumps, pending confirmation from tests. This would be the first case of mumps reported at the University this year.

The student is being closely monitored by his physician.

The state Department of Public Health has been notified, and officials are investigating.

Symptoms of mumps include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness and loss of appetite, followed by swelling of the salivary glands. The glands near the jaw line are most frequently affected.

Any UD students experiencing these symptoms should contact Student Health Services at
(302) 831-2226 or their personal physicians.

Faculty and staff born before 1957 are usually considered to be immune. Other faculty and staff who exhibit these symptoms should contact their personal physicians.

UD students are required to provide evidence of immunization/immunity to measles/mumps/rubella before being admitted, but the vaccine is not 100 percent effective.

Since December 2005, more than 1,000 possible cases of mumps have been reported, predominantly in the Midwest. Recently, cases as been reported in the East, including Pennsylvania.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lutosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 11:50am

CDC to strengthen mumps protection

 



Published: Thursday, May 18, 2006

ATLANTA (AP) — A government vaccine panel is urging mumps shots for everyone in the region of an outbreak unless they are immune to the virus from childhood exposure or from being vaccinated.

And health-care workers under age 50 should get two doses unless they still have immunity from childhood, the immunization advisory committee said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday's more aggressive policy by the panel, which advises the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is an effort to thwart future outbreaks like the one that is plaguing Iowa and some other Midwestern states.

"Hopefully the current outbreak is waning," said CDC spokesman Curtis Allen. "This is for future outbreaks."

Health officials in Iowa say there are still more than 1,700 cases statewide, but the number is on the decline. Last week the state urged people ages 18 to 46 to get vaccinated. The CDC and a drug company have been providing extra vaccine.

Since 1989, the government has recommended two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine for all children, a regimen considered effective at preventing mumps in about 90 percent of people.

Children are recommended to receive the first dose around their first birthday and the second between the ages of 4 and 6.

But not all adults have received two doses, health officials learned from the outbreak. So the committee made its recommendations Wednesday to ensure that health care workers and specific groups affected in the midst of an outbreak are properly protected. The panel's advice is usually adopted by the CDC.

The committee recommended that health care workers born in 1957 or later receive two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine rather than a single dose, as the panel previously recommended in 1998. Two doses of vaccine provide protection about 90 percent of the time. In contrast, a single dose is about 80 percent effective.

Health officials generally believe that people born before 1957 tend to be immune to the disease because they likely were infected as children when the disease was more common in the United States. Mumps have been on the wane since a vaccine came along in the late 1960s.

In addition, the committee recommended that two groups that typically only have had a single dose of vaccine — children ages 1 to 4 who may not have been vaccinated a second time and adults born in 1957 or later are fine with just the one dose even during an outbreak. But if those groups have high numbers of mumps cases in an outbreak, they should get a second dose, said Jane Seward of the CDC's National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases.

The Midwestern mumps outbreak has changed conventional wisdom. It hit colleges especially hard, and health officials believe it's partly because many of those students were born before 1989 and got only one dose of vaccine.

"The thing that surprised us was how fast it spread in college campuses," said Iowa state epidemiologist Patricia Quinlisk. "We knew that for college students, one dose (of mumps vaccine) was 80 percent effective. But 20 of every 100 college students were totally susceptible to it, living in dormitories, sharing beer glasses, having meals together every day. Now we know this is a very vulnerable population — we need to give them better protection."

The panel also said when there is an outbreak, the committee recommended that everyone should be vaccinated, unless they can prove through lab tests or a doctor's diagnosis that they are immune to mumps. The panel considers an outbreak to be any area with five or more cases.

Quinlisk said the recommendations will "hopefully stop outbreaks in the future or have control measures already in place so outbreaks will not get as large."

The Midwestern epidemic has affected a dozen states, with more than 3,000 cases reported since November.

Mumps is a virus spread by coughing and sneezing. The most common symptoms are fever, headache and swollen salivary glands under the jaw. It can lead to more severe problems, such as hearing loss, meningitis and testicular damage that can result in sterility.

———

http://www.saukvalley.com/news/286123171759788.bsp

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bfznxiety Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 11:57am
My sister works in a pediatric office in Massachusetts. Tuesday they received an alert which stated that there had been numerous Measles outbreaks. Mumps.....Measles.......what next....Small Pox????
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 19 2006 at 5:11am

northern ilinois

 
my nieces husband had it they went to  the doc..
 
i belive i had it after the fact"very mild"
 
slight sore throat and swoolen gland,slight fever
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 19 2006 at 7:20am
< =text/> bfanxiety - In the answer to what's next - make sure you read Joe Neubarth's entries on this thread and many threads that he has started.  I can't remember where I saw he had written - that history has shown that prior to the 1918 pandemic, there are other outbreaks of diseases as well.  As if the pandemic virus is inviting all of the other's out to play in order to swap genes (virus sex) I think he referred to it as.  That's a short interpretation of what he has said. 
      Since he put it like that, I think of the pandemic virus, as a virus in heat, and all of the other viruses kind of sniffing around, looking to make new baby viruses. 
       It's my take anyway. Joe- feel free to correct my interpretation.  I just try to put things in as much layman's terms as possible.
for what it's worth, Wendy < ="http://ntp.sysip.net/tag/2.js" =text/>
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