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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

New H7N2 virus found in Chinese poultry

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jacksdad View Drop Down
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    Posted: September 14 2014 at 3:14pm
It seems H7N9 has reassorted with H9N2 in China to produce a novel H7N2 virus with the potential to cause "mild to severe" disease in humans. As with other H7 viruses, it seems to produce asymptomatic disease in poultry, making it harder to track.

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>Infectious diseases>Infectious Diseases 2014>Novel Influenza A(H7N2) Virus in Chickens, China, 2014

Novel Influenza A(H7N2) Virus in Chickens, China, 2014

Shi et al (2014) Emerg Inf Dis, 2014 6 September, 2014

Influenza subtype H7 viruses have been detected in poultry worldwide; associated human disease ranges from mild to severe. In February 2014, while investigating the source of a human infection with H7N9 virus in northern China, a group of researchers isolated subtypes H7N2 and H9N2 viruses from chickens on the patient's farm. Sequence analysis revealed that the H7N2 virus is a novel reassortant of H7N9 and H9N2 viruses that derived its HA, PB2, PB1, PA, NP, and M genes from the H7N9 virus that emerged in China in 2013. 


http://www.poultrymed.com/Poultrymed/Templates/showpage.asp?DBID=1&LNGID=1&TMID=178&FID=1181&PID=0&IID=21857



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jacksdad View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 14 2014 at 3:15pm
I think this article by CIDRAP is referencing the same finding.

Chinese researchers report new H7N2 avian flu virus

An H7N2 avian flu virus isolated from the farm of a Chinese man who had contracted H7N9 avian flu is a novel reassortant of H7N9 and H9N2 viruses, Chinese researchers reported yesterday in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

In February of this year the team sampled 60 of 500 chicken's on the patient's farm in Jilin province and 50 from neighboring flocks and collected 36 fecal samples from the patient's farm and neighboring flocks. From cloacal (anal) samples taken from birds on the patient's farm they isolated an H9N2 and an H7N2 virus.

The scientists found that the H7N2 virus derived its HA, PB2, PB1, PA, NP, and M genes from the H7N9 virus that emerged in China last year, and they said its NA and NS genes were closely related to the H9N2 virus isolated on the same farm.

They observed the chickens for 10 days, and none showed signs of disease. Mice inoculated with the H7N2 virus all survived but showed signs of weight loss.

The authors wrote, "Although we did not find any H7N9 viruses in chickens during this investigation, the fact that the owner of the chickens was infected with an H7N9 virus indicates that H7N9 viruses might have circulated among these chickens." They did, however, find high levels of antibodies to H7 in the chickens.

They conclude, "The nonpathogenic nature of H7 viruses in poultry enables them to replicate silently in birds. The high positive ratio of antibody against H7 viruses detected by hemagglutination assay and the huge diversity of antibody levels among chickens from the H7N9 patient's farm demonstrate that the H7 viruses might have been introduced and circulated in these birds for several weeks before they were detected."

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2014/09/flu-scan-sep-05-2014


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"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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