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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

Post Reply - Flu Spread to Dogs - U.S. 2018


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Topic - Flu Spread to Dogs - U.S. 2018
Posted: January 11 2018 at 6:11pm By Medclinician
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/canineflu/keyfacts.htm

However, influenza viruses are constantly changing and it is possible for a virus to change so that it could infect humans and spread easily between humans. Human infections with new influenza viruses (against which the human population has little immunity) are concerning when they occur. Such viruses could present pandemic influenza threats. For this reason, CDC and its partners are monitoring the canine influenza H3N8 and H3N2 viruses (as well as other animal influenza viruses) closely. In general, canine influenza viruses are considered to pose a low threat to humans.

The H3N2 canine influenza virus is an avian flu virus that adapted to infect dogs. Although H3N2 viruses have been reported to infect cats, dog flu is a disease of dogs. This virus is different from human seasonal H3N2 viruses. Canine influenza A H3N2 virus was first detected in dogs in South Korea in 2007and has since been reported in China and Thailand. H3N2 canine influenza has reportedly infected some cats as well as dogs. It was first detected in the United States in April 2015. It is not known how canine H3N2 virus was introduced into the United States.

Even worse, nearly three-quarters of the 1,544 laboratory-confirmed cases of flu seen in the U.S. since Oct. 1 were of the H3N2 variety, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Medclinician