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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Now tracking the Aussie Flu.

Painless flu jab patch

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EdwinSm, View Drop Down
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    Posted: June 27 2017 at 9:31pm
Some good news on the flu vaccine delivery front (well maybe if all the testing goes well).

The main selling point will be to deal with people who fear needles,  but there are significant implications of it having a non-refrigerated shelf life of one year, and the ability for easy disposal.

Originally posted by BBC BBC wrote:

A 'painless' sticking plaster flu jab that delivers vaccine into the skin has passed important safety tests in the first trial in people.

The patch has a hundred tiny hair-like microneedles on its adhesive side that penetrate the skin's surface.

It is simple enough for people to stick on themselves.

That should help more people get immunised, including those who are scared of injections, experts told the Lancet journal .

Unlike the standard flu jab, it doesn't need to be kept in the fridge, meaning pharmacies could easily stock it on their shelves for people to buy.

Volunteers who tested it said they preferred it to injections.

It offers the same protection as a regular vaccine, but without pain, according to its developers from Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology, who are funded by the US National Institutes of Health.

....

Experts say the patch could revolutionise how flu and other vaccines are given, although more clinical tests over the next few years are needed to get the patch system approved for widespread use.

...

The patch can be thrown in the bin after it is used because the microneedles dissolve away.

And because it can be safely stored for up to a year without refrigeration, it could prove extremely useful in the developing world.....

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40402775
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carbon20 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 28 2017 at 7:30pm
I'm waiting for an anti virus,virus.....
12 monkeys!!!!!
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