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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

Palivizumab treats respiratory syncytial virus

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    Posted: August 21 2018 at 3:05pm
The use of palivizumab monoclonal antibodyto control an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus infection in a special care baby unit

Abstract

An outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection affected seven premature infants in a special care baby unit during November and December 1999. Conventional infection control measures (cohorting infected babies, strict reinforcement of the use of gloves and aprons, emphasis on hand disinfection) failed to prevent spread. Palivizumab, a respiratory syncytial virus monoclonal antibody, was given to eight high-risk preterm infants. There were no further cases of RSV in the unit and none of the babies given palivizumab developed RSV. One baby who acquired RSV during the outbreak (and who was not given palivizumab) was subsequently admitted to hospital with another episode of RSV bronchiolitis. The role of palivizumab in the control of hospital outbreaks of RSV infection merits further investigation.

Source and article (for those with access):   https://www.journalofhospitalinfection.com/article/S0195-6701(01)91002-3/abstract
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