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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

PREPPING ON A BUDGET

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    Posted: January 29 2006 at 5:26pm

Recommendations about prepping when money is tight.

What to get when money is limited.

Where to get economy preps.

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Originally posted by TNbebo408:

Rbarnes55 asked about making a list of cheap supplies. I will start the list with stuff I know is under ten bucks and where I get them. Everyone, PLEASE add your cheaper items and lets keep it simple, and CHEAP.

Dollar store, dried beans, rice, canned beef, chilli, soups, ramen soup mix, dry milk, toilet paper, paper towels, cleaning supplies, hand sanitizers, personal cleaning items. Tea, coffee, sweetner. Coffee filters for water filters only. Bleach, laundry supplies. Plastic totes, lidded garbage cans, for water storage, you MUST keep water in dark and cool.

I did buy each for person in the home, three towels, three wash rags, and three hand towels, three changes of tough clothes, work clothes like, 12 pairs of socks, 12 underwear and one extra pair of boots.

Sav a lot, canned veggies, spam, dry beans, rice, BIG bags of beans 50 LB, they have big bags flour, meal, rice also. Salt cured ham, keeps a year with no fridge.

Walmart, awful place but, solar lights, coleman fuel, coleman parts, small arms ammo, shotgun, 22 rifle ammo. They too high on 30 caliber stuff.

northern tools, Solar lights, sealed ammo cans, they are $12 but worth it for food storage. Duct tape, tarps, wheat grinder, corn grinder, hand water pump, tools. Look em on net.

Harbor freight, Solar lights, 12 volt jump start units, solar chargers and more of the same, and look em up also.

Local coop, or tractor supply company, white salt blocks, fifty LB for $3.50 Rubber water troughs to catch rain water.

Please everyone, add your ideas and place to get them. We are a scattered group, few of us seem to be close to another member. Our shopping places will vary.

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Originally posted by amyjo:

Go to the asian/ethnic food stores.  They have huge supplies of dried everything there.  I actually am part asian so I love that stuff anyway.  I usually buy dried fish, dried seaweed (an awesome source of nutrients), dried mushrooms.  Their spices are usually way cheaper.  They have big containers of oils, etc.  I also buy tins of sardines, they have all kinds of stuff pickled and canned as well.  AND you all should consider cous cous.  It is a pasta that is very easy to store (takes up little space) and I swear, one cup of it poofs into a dinner for four.  It is one of my favorite things.  You can add anything to it from meat, broth to fruit/juice, raisins.  It is awesome.

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Originally posted by Muskrat:

For those that are not totally well off to prepare..there are other options ..they could go to the locale food banks and take some of those items and store those away if possible...some churches will help out those less fortunate..but come on lets also be real if you can afford the internet..

In order to prep I have had to give up extra things such as the cable channlels..less driving the car..the heat turned down...buying the children second hand clothing, instead of new..it is a suffle of the budget..

but I also know what you are saying..I am single mom on a fixed income and when I was working I was forever stocking up...to me food at this point is more important then alot of other material things..

Also instead of buying a 750 gram bag of pasta for 87 cents..then buy a 900 gram bag for 1.00 and store a sandwich bag away...I figure each half sandwich bag of pasta I store away is one more meal..it won,t be hard to grow tomatoes(I hope) looking into a green house this week..

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote htpp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 03 2006 at 7:58pm

What would the 50# white salt blocks be used for?

 

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You can buy 50Lb salt for $3.50 and bust it up to use it, instead of buying 9LB in the little boxes for the same money.
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Thanks, looks like I need to go to the local Tractor Supply tomorrow and see what else they might have.  Thanks again!
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Check out the small propane heaters, they call em buddy heaters or something, they higher than harbor freight, but they usually have a good choice of them.
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I bought several rolls of Bounty papertowels last week on sale at my Wal-Mart.  By cutting the roll in half, adding a cup of water with a little baby shampoo and a little baby oil  then taking out the cardboard section in the middle you can easily make your own wet-wipes.   I store mine in left-over 5 gallon ice cream containers.  This is cheaper than buying them premade and they'll be good for cleaning when showers aren't a every-day luxury. I've done this for years on all my kids, they work well.  Has to be Bounty papertowels - cheap ones fall apart - so I always watch for them to go on sale then stockup.

Aldi's food store is great, bought a whole cart load of food tonight for $50.00.  There is a store in Sellersburg, Indiana that sells expired, damaged and overstocked foods - very, very cheap.  I don't buy the expired items, always check the dates, but the overstock items are very cheap - cereal for $1.00 box, tomatoe paste .25, Kool-aid .5 a pack, 50# dog food $7.00. I always walk out w/2 carts and have never spent over $70.00.

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Eat what you store, store what you eat, and buy everything in bulk while it's on sale.

Last week over 1/2 my food budget was spent on 20 jars of spaghetti sauce and 30 cans of tuna. This week I spent 1/2 my food budget on 60 cans of vegetables, 12 boxes of pasta, and 24 bags of Ramen noodles. 2 weeks ago I spent $45.00 on 40 pounds of hamburger.

I try to spend 1/2 my food budget on basic, easy to store foods that are 1/2 or 1/3 the usual price. This allows me to purchase at least 25% more food for the same amount of money.

As much as possible I try to only cook with easy to store items.  For example even though we have REALLY good prices here on day old bread, I still bake all my bread because white flour stores well, and I can make sure to rotate a LARGE stock of flour, by using it every day. I add quick oats to my bread because they store MUCH better than whole wheat flour.

We eat canned instead of frozen vegetables because they store better and have little nutritional difference, once cooked. I also need to leave my small freezer for stocking hamburger when on sale and can't waste it on less enpensive items.

If you get into the habit of eating what you store, storing what you eat, and buying as much as possible when on sale, you WILL be able to stock up.

Also change how you eat. Start filling up on less enpensive ingredients. Make a big bowl of popcorn each night. Make sure to boil up your leftover chicken into soup and serve with a cheap homemade bread. Eat lots of root vegetables, bought cheaply once a month.

Get a notebook. Go to your local stores. Make a list of the cheapest, most nutritious, easiest to store ingredients. Gradually learn to cook with JUST those ingredients.

This is my basic list and what I cook most often.

Produce and Legumes

 

fresh:

potatoes

onions

carrots

 

canned:

corn

green beans

peas

tomatoes

kidney beans

peaches

apple sauce

pickles

jam

peanut butter (natural)

lemon juice

vinegar

 

frozen:

orange juice

 

dried:

raisins

popcorn

 

Grains

 

white flour

quick oats

corn starch

white rice

 

Meats

 

hamburger

chicken (whole)

hot dogs

tuna

 

Dairy and fats

 

dry milk

eggs

butter or margarine

Monterey Jack cheese

Parmesan cheese

corn oil

 

Condiments, Spices, Baking

 

ketchup

mustard

mayonnaise

gravy darkener

beef cubes

chicken cubes

garlic powder

onion powder

parsley

Italian seasoning

chili powder

soy sauce

salt

pepper

cinnamon

vanilla flavoring

baking powder

baking soda

yeast

sugar

molasses

cocoa

tea

 

Emergency Foods

 

Jello

Imitation salt (containing potassium)

Ginger Ale

Tang

Dried Soup Mix

 

  

Oatmeal

 

Bring 3 ¾ cups water to a boil. Add 2 cups quick oats and ¼ teas salt to the boiling water. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring constantly.

Serve with milk and sugar, maple syrup, honey, or jam. Add fresh, canned or dried fruit.

 

Pancakes

 

Sift together 1 ½ cups flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon baking powder and ½ teaspoon salt. Beat in 1 egg, 1 ¼ cups milk and 2 tablespoons oil. Cook on hot, greased frying pan.

 

Serve with butter and sprinkle with brown sugar, or white sugar and lemon juice. Make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Make a sandwich with an egg and melted cheese as a filling.

 

French Toast

 

Beat together an egg and an equal amount of milk. Dip slices of bread in the milk/egg mixture and fry on a hot, buttered frying pan.

 

Serve as suggested above for pancakes, or with a white sauce or gravy.

 

Overnight Oatmeal Bread

 

Dissolve 1 teaspoon of yeast (½ foil packet) in ½ cup warm water. Set aside. Pour 2 cups hot water over 2 cups of oats. Let sit till cool enough not to burn a finger. Add dissolved yeast and stir well. Stir in 1/3 cup brown sugar (or any sweetener), 1/3 cup oil, and 1 tablespoon salt. Knead in enough white flour to make a sticky, but kneadable dough. Knead for 10 minutes. Grease a cookie sheet and roll dough into a long jellyroll shape. Place on cookie sheet, cover and let rise overnight. Bake at 350 degrees until bread can be knocked on.

 

Quick Rise Oatmeal bread can be made with 4 teaspoons yeast and risen as in the white bread below.

 

Quick Rise White Bread

 

Dissolve 4 teaspoons yeast in 2 ½ cups water. Add 1/3 cup sugar, 1/3 cup oil, and 1 tablespoon salt. Add enough flour to make a kneadable dough. Knead for 10 minutes. Shape dough into a large jelly roll and place on a greased cookie sheet. Place cookie sheet on top of a large bowl filled with hot water and cover. Let rise until double in bulk. Bake at 350 degrees until medium brown and can be knocked on.

 

Overnight White Bread can be made with 1 teaspoon yeast and risen overnight as in the oatmeal bread above.

 

Irish Soda Bread

 

In a large bowl, combine 2 cups flour, ½ teaspoon salt, 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder, ½ teaspoon baking soda, and 2 tablespoons sugar. Cut 2 tablespoons butter into the flour mixture. In another bowl, beat together 1 egg, ¾ cup milk, and 1 tablespoon vinegar. Pour liquid mixture into flour mixture. Add raisins if desired. Knead dough for 2-3 minutes and shape into a round loaf. Place loaf in greased cake pan and cut a cross in the top about ½ inch deep. Bake in preheated 375 degree oven for 35-40 minutes.

 

Biscuits

 

Sift together 2 cups flour, 1 tablespoon baking powder and 1 teaspoon salt. Stir in ¼ cup oil and ¾ cups milk. Stir and form into a ball. Pat into a square or rectangle. Cut into squares. Place on a greased cookie sheet and bake at 450 degrees for about 10-12 minutes or till the tops and bottoms begin to brown.

 

Biscuit dough can be spread onto a greased cookie sheet to make a thin crust pizza. Or roll out and spread with butter and cinnamon and sugar, and then roll up into a jelly roll and slice into cinnamon rolls.

 

Tea Scones

 

Sift together 2 cups flour, 1 tablespoon baking powder, ½ teaspoon salt, and 2 tablespoons sugar. Rub in ¼ cup butter. Add ½ cup milk and 1 beaten egg. Shape dough into a flat circle. Brush with milk. Sprinkle with sugar. Cut into pie shaped pieces. Bake on a greased cookie sheet, at 450 degrees for 10-12 minutes. Serve with lemon jam.

 

Instead of rubbing in butter, ¼ oil can be added with the milk and egg.

 

Lemon Jam

 

Beat together and boil 1 cup sugar, 3 eggs, ¼ cup lemon juice. When mixture begins to thicken, remove from heat and add 2 tablespoons butter.

 

Hearty Oatmeal Scones

 

Sift together 1 cup flour, 1 tablespoon baking powder, ½ teaspoon salt, and 2 tablespoons brown sugar. Add 1 cup quick oats. Rub in ¼ cup butter. Add ½ cup milk and 1 beaten egg. Shape dough into a flat circle. Cut into pie shaped pieces. Bake on a greased cookie sheet, at 450 degrees for 10-12 minutes.

 

Serve with a piece of cheese, meat or an egg. Raisins and 1 teaspoon of cinnamon can be added to the batter and the top can be brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar, as in the above recipe for Tea Scones.

 

Instead of rubbing in butter, ¼ oil can be added with the milk and egg.

 

Sandwiches and Alternatives

 

Instead of making sandwiches, serve breads with a piece of cheese, cold meat, or a boiled egg.

 

Sandwich spreads can be made by combining some diced egg, chicken or tuna with a bit of mayonnaise and dried parsley.

 

Grilled cheese sandwiches can be cooled on a cooling rack, and eaten later cold. Bits of leftover meat, egg and vegetables can be added to grilled cheese sandwiches.

 

Sandwiches can be made with scones, biscuits or even pancakes.

 

Crepes

 

Thin pancake batter with extra milk and cook as pancakes. Sprinkle chopped leftovers, tuna, chopped eggs, cheese, fruit, jam or whatever you have down the middle of the crepes and roll up into logs. Drizzle savory crepes with some gravy or a pasta sauce.

 

Tortillas/Fajitas

 

Stir together 1 cup flour, ¼ cup oil, ¾ cups water, 1 teaspoon salt. Add about 1 more cup of flour. Knead dough for a minute and break dough up into ping pong ball sized balls. Let rest for about 15 minutes. Roll dough out into paper thin circles. Bake on ungreased frying pan for about 20 seconds a side, over medium heat.

 

Fill with leftovers, cheese, browned hamburg or beans. Drizzle with Mexican sauce. Roll up into logs.

 

Calzones, Rolls and Tarts

 

Make some bread dough, biscuit dough or pie crust. Roll small amounts of dough out into circles. Fill with leftovers, browned and seasoned meat, cheese or whatever you have. Fold dough into half moon shape and seal the edges. Let bread dough rise till puffy. Biscuit dough and pie crust can be baked immediately. Bake on greased cookie sheet for about 30 minutes or till browned, at about 375 degrees.

 

Hot Open Faced Sandwiches/Sloppy Joes

 

Simmer leftover chopped chicken, browned hamburg or chopped hotdogs in BBQ or Mexican Sauce or gravy. Simmer leftovers or chopped, boiled eggs in a White Sauce. Pour filling over thick slices of homemade bread or rolls.

 

BBQ Sauce

 

Combine 3 tablespoons vinegar,  2 tablespoons sugar,  1 cup ketchup, ½ cup water,  ¼ teaspoon prepared mustard. ½ teaspoon garlic powder, ½ teaspoon onion powder. Simmer for 5 minutes.

 

Mexican sauce

 

Add 1 teaspoon chili powder to 1 cup BBQ Sauce.

 

Pizza

 

Dissolve 1-2 tablespoons yeast, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon salt in 2 ¼ cups warm water. Add 3 tablespoons oil. Stir in enough flour to make a dough. Knead for 10 minutes. Let rise till double in bulk. Grease 2 cookie sheets with a solid fat, not oil. Oil makes the dough much harder to spread. Spread the dough onto the cookie sheets. Top with whatever you have and bake at 425 degrees till crust is golden brown on the bottom and topping have begun to brown.

 

Be creative with your toppings. Use ketchup, pasta sauce or canned tomatoes for the sauce. Use any kind of cheese. Top with browned and seasoned hamburger or leftover chicken. Sprinkle with chopped onion. Use ANYTHING you have.

 

Pot Roasted Chicken

 

Place chicken, vegetables, potatoes, and herbs, and spices in a large roasting pan. Pour in several cups of water. Water should cover the crunchier vegetables. Potatoes should be left whole and unpeeled and placed on top of the crunchier vegetables. Cover and bake at 400 degrees for about 1 ½ to 2 hours. Bake all the leftovers into a pie.

 

Gravy

 

Measure and pour the broth into a sauce pan. Dissolve corn starch into lukewarm water and add to broth. Use 1 tablespoon corn starch to each cup of total liquid. For example 6 cups broth and 2 cups lukewarm water will require 8 tablespoons (½ cup) corn starch. Darken with a little gravy darkener if necessary.

 

Pie Crust

 

Sift together 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon baking powder. Stir in ½ cup oil and ½ cup water. Roll into 2 round crusts. Fold dough in half and in half again, to transfer to pan, then unfold in pan. Bake pies in a 9 inch cake pan, so fillings do not overflow. This is a soft, biscuity dough that can be easily repaired if a hole forms. Double the recipe for an 11x13 roasting pan.

 

BBQ Chicken

 

Place whole chicken in a roasting pan. Pour a little water in the pan and cover. Bake at 400 degrees until chicken is about ¾ cooked. Uncover and coat chicken with BBQ sauce. Crank the heat up and cook chicken till skin is crunchy and slightly charred.

 

Leftover meat can be used on pizza, in a pasta sauce or quiche, or as a sandwich filling.

 

The bones and skin, and tiny bits of meat can be boiled into broth and made into Tortellini Soup.

 

To quickly defrost whole chickens, place in a watertight bag and submerge in hot water.

 

Pasta

 

Beat 3 eggs and ½ teaspoon salt. Stir and then knead in enough flour to make a stiff dough. Divide dough into 4 pieces and roll out into paper thin rectangles. Cut rectangles into smaller noodles or use whole as lasagna noodles or to make tortellini.

 

Noodles can be dried and stored for 1 month, or boiled when fresh.

 

Pasta sauces

 

Sauté 1 onion in oil. Add a can of tomatoes. Add Italian seasonings. Add bits of leftover chicken or browned hamburg. Simmer for 15 minutes to an hour. Add salt and pepper to taste. Can also be used for pizza.

 

Bring 1 ½ cups milk to almost a boil. Dissolve 2 tablespoons corn starch into ½ cup milk and add to hot milk. Bring to a boil. Add salt and pepper to taste. If desired, add some cheese and stir till melted. White sauce and cheese sauce can also be used on baked potatoes, toast, biscuits and French toast.

 

Lasagna and Casseroles

 

Roll pasta recipe into 4 paper thin rectangles and add to boiling water. Rectangles will become larger as they are boiled, and easily fit in a 9x13 roasting pan. Boil for about 10 minutes and drain and then let cool on a flat surface.

 

Create a layered casserole with one or more pasta sauces, slices of cheese, leftover meat, tuna and/or vegetables or whatever you have. Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

 

Tortellini

 

Make a filling of 1 cup diced, cooked meat, ½ teaspoon each of garlic powder, onion powder, salt, pepper, and a teaspoon of dried parsley, and ¼ cup parmesan cheese. Taste and add more seasoning if desired. Add 1 beaten egg to the mixture.

 

Roll ¼ of the pasta recipe out into a rectangle. Cut into 1 inch squares. Add bits of ¼ of the filling to the center of each square. Fold the squares into triangles and pinch the edges to seal them. If dough is too dry to stick, moisten with a few drops of water. Leave as triangles or pinch two of the corners together to make a hat shape. Use up the rest of the dough and filling, ¼ at a time.

 

Boil the tortellini in chicken broth or water, until tender.

 

Meatballs/ Salisbury Steak

 

Combine 1 1/4 pounds hamburger, 2 eggs, 2 cups stale homemade bread, 1 teaspoon garlic powder, 1 teaspoon onion powder, ½ teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon pepper, 1 tablespoon dried parsley and ¼ cup parmesan cheese (optional). Shape into balls or patties and bake in 375 degree oven till centers are gray. Serve in a red sauce or gravy.

 

Chili

 

Fry 1 onion and a handful of hamburger, till the meat is browned and the onion is soft. Add a large can of tomatoes, two 16 oz cans kidney beans , 1 tablespoon dried parsley and chili powder, salt, pepper, and garlic powder to taste. Simmer for 1 hour on low heat.

 

Shepard's Pie

 

Brown 1 1/4 pounds hamburger. Pour off grease. Dissolve 1 tablespoon corn starch in 1 cup water. Pour into hamburger. Add 2 beef cubes and a few drops of gravy darkener. Cook till gravy bubbles. Meanwhile boil 5-8 peeled and sliced potatoes till soft enough to mash. Make 3/4 pie crust recipe and pat into a 9x13 roasting pan. Place hamburger mixture onto crust. Spoon 1 can vegetable onto hamburger mixture. Spoon mashed potatoes onto the vegetables. Drag a fork across the mashed potatoes, so they will brown better. Bake at 400 degrees till crust and potatoes are browned.

 

Quiche

 

Make ½ pie crust recipe. Pat into 9 inch cake pan. Beat 3 eggs and 1 cup milk. Pour onto crust. Add ANYTHING you have: sautéed onions, leftover vegetables, leftover meat, cheese, chopped tomato. Read an omelet book for ideas.

 

Strata

 

In a large bowl, beat together: 8 eggs, 4 cups milk, 1 teaspoon prepared mustard, 1 teaspoon salt, ¼ teaspoon pepper. Set aside. Fill a greased 9x13 pan 1/3 full of torn, stale bread. Sprinkle cheese, tuna, leftovers, canned tomatoes, or whatever you have, over the bread. Layer more torn, stale bread on top of the filling ingredients.  Pour milk and egg mixture over the bread and filling ingredients. Place in refrigerator for 2-24 hours. Bake for 45 minutes at 325 degrees.

 

Asian Fried Rice

 

Sauté 1 large onion in a little cooking oil, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 teaspoon garlic powder and 1 tablespoon soy sauce, until onion is tender. Add 3 cups cooked rice and 2 cut up, boiled or fried eggs. Continue to cook and stir until eggs and rice are warm and have absorbed some of the sauce. Add more soy sauce if desired.

 

If you have any leftover meat and vegetables, add them with the eggs and rice.

 

 

Mock Boiled Dinner

 

In a large pot, boil some onions, potatoes and carrots and till tender. Add a package of hotdogs and boil for another 10 minutes. Serve with Irish soda bread.

 

 

Snicker Doodle Coffee Cake

 

Cream 1 1/3 cups sugar and 2/3 cups oil. Beat in 2 eggs, a little at a time. Gradually stir in 1 1/3 cups milk. In another bowl, sift together 3 cups flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder and ½ teaspoon salt. Add the dry ingredients to the creamed ones. Pour batter into a greased and floured 9x13 inch roasting pan or two 9 inch cake pans. Sprinkle top of cake with cinnamon and sugar. Bake at 350 degrees till top of cake is golden brown and the center is set.

 

Chocolate Cake

 

Sift together 3 cups flour, 2 cups sugar, ½ cup cocoa, 2 teaspoons baking soda and 1 teaspoon salt. Beat in 2/3 cup oil, 2 cups water, and 2 tablespoons vinegar. Pour batter into a greased 9x13 inch pan and bake at 350 degrees till center is set.

 

Biscotti

 

Cream ¼ cup (½ stick) butter and 1 cup sugar. Gradually beat in 3 eggs. Add 1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon extract or liquor if you have some. In another bowl sift together 2 ¼ cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder and ¼ teaspoon salt. Add dry ingredients to creamed mixture. Shape dough into 2 long, narrow logs on a greased cookie sheet. Bake in a 375 degree oven till set. Slice logs and turn cookies on their sides and bake again till golden brown.

 

Spices, nuts and raisins can be added to the cookies. Chocolate Biscotti can be made by adding ¼ cup cocoa and another ½ cup sugar and decreasing the flour to 1 ¾ cups.

 

Oatmeal cookies

 

Cream together ½ cup soft butter, ½ cup brown sugar and ½ cup white sugar. Beat in 1 egg. Add 1 tablespoon vanilla. In another bowl sift together 1 cup flour and ½ teaspoon baking soda. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture. Stir in 1 cup quick oats.

 

Drop by rounded teaspoon fulls onto greased cookie sheets and bake at 350 degrees until centers are set.

 

Bread Pudding

 

Fill a greased 9x13 roasting pan about 3/4 full of stale homemade white bread. In a large bowl, beat together 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 tablespoon vanilla and 4 cups milk. Pour over the bread. Bake at 350 degrees till the custard is set.

 

Brown Sugar

 

Combine 2 tablespoons molasses to each cup of white sugar.

                                                                                                         

Vanilla milk

 

Dissolve 1 or 2 tablespoons sugar in hot water. Add 1 cup slightly warm water. Add 1 1/3 cups dry milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla flavoring. Stir till dissolved. Add enough ice and cold water to make 4 cups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote libbyalex Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 04 2006 at 5:49am
Welcome aboard, KatDoe! Great first post that I will print out next time I'm hooked up to a printer! -- Libby
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chefmom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 04 2006 at 10:52am
Love the bread recipes Katdoe! Thank you for sharing all of this wonderful info with us.
May God protect us all.       
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TNbebo408 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 04 2006 at 7:50pm
I put my first aid items in cleaned buckets that held sheetrock mud, they have lids and bucket tool holders on the outside of them are full also.

They stack perfect, hold lots of stuff and were FREE. Except the tool holders, I paid big bucks for them, $2 each at flea market.

I have the same buckets crammed full of stuff in my barn.
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All of the suggestions above are good but keep in mind that you can live indefinitely on beans,rice and some cooking oil or lard and of course water. Some paper towels and toilet paper would be nice to but not manditorty. The best way to store water is to have a "Big Burkey" water filter. It will purify just about any kind of water and it is mobile so that if you are forced to move for any reason,you can take it with you and not be force to carry hundreds of pound of stored water. Unless you live in a dessert,you can always find a source of water of some kind. Johnray
Concerned Physician
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KatDoe67 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 05 2006 at 2:51pm

I'm concerned about the bird flu, but not frightened. I'm using this forum to learn more about being prepared in GENERAL for a VARIETY of emergencies. Little by little, panicking about nothing, I'm changing my way of life, so that I can roll with the punches easier, and be more helpful to others.

By learning to eat from mostly storage bought in bulk on sale, I was able to cut my food bill to 1/3 of what it used to be, and improved how we ate at the same time. Cooking takes longer, but it's worth it. Shopping and putting away groceries is actually quicker now :-0

Now I can go for weeks on just $10.00 a week for groceries if we have a temporary money shortage. I also now have the freedom to give BAGS of groceries to a struggling friend without feeling the pinch, by just raiding my pantry.

I very much enjoy the feeling of power and security I have from being stocked up on a few basic ingredients and knowing how to make nice meals from them.

Yes, it's true MOST of us can live a long time off of beans, rice, fat and water. I'd rather PLAN a simple life to live, that I can maintain even when the SHTF.

I've gone hungry in the past. I know what hungry people crave. Salt, sugar, white flour, yeast, dry milk, oats and tea go a LONG way to making the above list more pleasurable! Too many beans can cause some people a LOT of pain and make them sick :-( White flour is not an evil ingredient to most people with sensitive tummies, unless they have a gluten intolerance.

Add a little tuna and canned fruit, and life gets even better :-)

A little jello, tang, chicken bullion, and imitation salt containing potassium will keep a sick person going a LONG time.

No one should go in debt or fight with a spouse over bird flu :-( Better to work on changing your life style in GENERAL to be better prepared for ANY emergency :-)

Kat

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TNbebo408 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 05 2006 at 4:41pm
Kat I agree with you, we stock stuff, just to save on gas to the store where we buy our canned goods and big bags of beans, flour and meal. I am some concerned about bird flu, but not freaked out over it. I am more worried about bills than flu.

I made a big pantry from a bedroom we didn't want to use anymore. Keeps the unwanted kinfolk from feeling welcome. Closed the motel for good.

We don't buy anything we don't use daily, no spacecamp foods as I call it. No MREs, freezed dried veggies or anything we don't recognize on a plate.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 19 2006 at 3:42pm
The $1 and $.99 chain stores are both terrific and tend to carry different items (in my experience). Terrific savings! Cleaning products that normally are around $3 are $1. I just made a big buying run today, was able to fill some holes in my long-term storage and also found a bunch of stuff for my diabetic husband. I'm thrilled! Except for a few cans of dehydrated meat  because of him, I'm not buying anything that we normally wouldn't eat.  It's amazing where you can find places to store your preps when you put your mind to it (and have friendly people on the net who give you great tips).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TNbebo408 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 19 2006 at 5:09pm
If lard is available in your area, get a can or two. Many uses, in cooking. Goes well with grits if you aint got butter.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TheBeginning Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 27 2006 at 11:45am

Paper plates; paper cups; plastic forks, spoons, and knives;  large trash bags.  Water could be a cherished commodity that you don't want to waste washing dishes.  Not environmentally correct but may be necessary til the bug bugs out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Falcon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 13 2006 at 8:15am

people can get the internet for free at resource centers and such, you can also get dial up for about 12.99 a month at Kel Com, so really people with tight budgets can get a computer for about 50 if they pay attention to local adds.  So technically speaking anyone can afford a working computer and the internet for a reasonable price, you just need to know where to look.

Dollar stores have good items you can get for a dollar a piece or under.

I look at the stars and wonder what it would be like to touch them.
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