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WATER

Printed From: Avian Flu Talk
Category: Home & Family Planning
Forum Name: General Planning Tips
Forum Description: (Home and family preparedness)
URL: http://www.avianflutalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=963
Printed Date: December 07 2019 at 9:14am


Topic: WATER
Posted By: Guests
Subject: WATER
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 4:27pm

Important information about water.

Storing

Disinfecting

Collecting & Conserving




Replies:
Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 5:17pm

I store my water in washed out 2 litre pop bottles..few drops of regular house bleach...

Also when and if power goes out..fill all of your pots,sink,tubs and any containers you have with water..to use for washing..you can also use the water in your hot water tank(I have read lately it would be ok to dring)

 



Posted By: AuntBones
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 5:40pm
Locate shut off valve to your main waterpipe in  your house. Make sure you have a wrench to turn it off if need be. If your city water system is down remember do not drink the water for 72 hours.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 5:52pm

Originally posted by corky52:

My view is that the likely length of this  event is sooner or later going to force most of us to hunt water, lots of water!  The little survival filters aren't going to hack it for very long or be a very comfortable volume.  Do you have a way to move volumes of water easily, it's heavy and bulky to move, and you'll need lots of it.  Can you clean the water and then kill all the bad stuff you can't see?

Fact: Water weighs 8 plus pounds per gallon!  5 gallons of water weighs 40 pounds, remember the pictures of the people with shoulder poles that had small buckets of water at each end, brutal!!

Fact: There are all kinds of crap that end up in free water, most of them nasty and hard to deal with. 

Fact: Viruses are extremely hard to kill in water and we'll be dealing with a virus based threat plus all the normal things.

We need to look beyond storage to purification if this event is as real as we believe.  Simple stuff will make effective purification but you have to have it on hand ahead of time.  You need to look for water sources you'll be able to access and at how you'll move the water to your places. 



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 5:53pm

Originally posted by bruss01:

I am hoping for a fairly brief crisis, 2-6 months.  Currently we have some store-bought water in jugs for immediate use. We have over 100 gallons of water available in bulk storage. In a long-term emergency, myself and my wife would have to rely on water from our local river (which in time of crisis may be polluted  with untreated sewage or runoff) . So I share your concern about how to purify water on a long term basis.

I'd like to invite you to investigate the  http://www.generalecology.com/portablesystem.htm - First Need water filter that is capable of removing darn near everything you'd find objectionable in water intended for drinking.  You can get replacement cartriges for the unit.  Many friends and I have used these on backpacking trips, the water has always been crystal clear.  One caution -  you need to protect the unit from freezing since the ceramic element can crack if frozen. 

For our bulk storage and for treating any questionable water obtained from an impure source, we plan to use swimming pool shock (calcium hypochlorite) to treat water.  We plan to have 4 barrels of 55 gallon capacity to store "city water", and we will be adding a minimal amount of shock just to give a base level of protection during storage, since the barrels will be sealed and the water changed out for fresh every 6 months.  We will have extra shock on hand for treating non-city water if needed.  We think this is better than bleach because calcium hypochlorite will store in dry form nearly indefinitely (10 years), whereas liquid chlorine bleach loses half of it's potency after a year (use twice as much for the same effect) and is http://theepicenter.com/tow02236.html - next to worthless after two years.

For those who remember Y2K, http://www.greenspun.com/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg.tcl?msg_id=0010R5 - here's a flashback for you :

"Dry chlorine, also called calcium hypochlorite has the added benefit of extended shelf life. Providing it is kept dry, cool and in an airtight container, it may be stored up to 10 years with minimal degradation. If you want to keep chlorine in larger quantities, this is the item to store (according to Bingo1). It must be ONLY 65% calcium hypochlorite, no addtional anti-fungals or clarifiers. In an EXTREMELY well ventilated area, (Hint: OUTSIDE!) add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately 1/4 ounce) for each two gallons of water. Five pounds of dry pool bleach costs about $10-15, which will make about 92 gallons of bleach, which will sterilize 706,560 gallons of clear water, or 353,280 gallons of cloudy water. "




Posted By: meewee
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 6:59pm

http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html - http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html

NOW TRY IT! Grr!

Meewee



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God Bless us all!


Posted By: swankyc
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 8:02pm

Quick easy way to get alot of water without hassle

I orignally posted this elsewhere

You can get large plastic tanks online that holds a little up to several hundred gallons and dont really take too much room up.  There is a spigot on the front of them that makes getting the water easy. 

Something like this:

http://www.watertanks.com/category/153/ - http://www.watertanks.com/category/153/

 



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I'm not afraid, I'm paranoid. Dont talk too loud, they are listening.


Posted By: Doodlebug
Date Posted: January 30 2006 at 9:00am
www.gotwater2.com (sorry, can't get link button to work) has water bladders of 30 gal., 60 gal., and on up.  They're a bit more expensive than water barrels ($79 for 60 gal), but they fold up and store easily when not in use, and they cost very little to ship ($23.80 to ship four to my house).


Posted By: Boozy
Date Posted: January 30 2006 at 11:49am
save it now.......gallon jugs from milk,juice,pop jugs..............because your goin 2 have water 2 cook............

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i'm soory 4 what i've did and 2 say i love everybody n the world............

make your peace now with people u love or know


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 03 2006 at 11:24pm
http://www.nitro-pak.com/index.php?cPath=40

Water barrels.  The cost is a few hundred dollars out of pocket, but you can store ALOT of water.  Use it when you have to, top off in between episodes of power outs.


The Rock is Gonna Fall on Us - Harry Chapin
I must not be done preparing: my credit card still has space - Me


Posted By: Scott
Date Posted: February 06 2006 at 9:42pm
New to the site. I hope to add what little knowledge I have.

http://www.nitro-pak.com/index.php?cPath=40
The Miox water purifier.
I purchased this unit. It is small, requires no cartridges etc. just a couple batteries. I also like this unit because it is so easy to carry in a bug out bag.
Claims to kill viruses-which is what we want in addition to other micro-bugs. Marines are using this in Iraq with no problems.

Primary concern of public water is not that it will run out, I think it will be the lack of capacity of your local municapality to treat the water. For example, where I live, they still use chlorine to kill viruses etc. at the treatment plant. You may live in an area where they utilize UV to kill virus in drinking water. With a "just in time" global economy, my municapality probably has a weeks worth of chlorine on hand. After that, we will be required to boil the water which will kill the virus (power or not, there will be no chlorine in the supply chain)  UV equipped facilities (water plants) will not have a chlorine problem as they use UV to kill virus. Of course if the power is out or speratic, UV does not work. The pumps will not work any way. I would not chance it.....Anything that comes from an outside pipe is going to get treated with clorox, miox etc.

We all hope to have enough stored water, but in worse case scenario no water in the pipe, no lake or river, you can always extract water from the air utilzing plastic, stone and some twine. Solar Kiln, or something like that.






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As the Dark Horse Approaches.
Improvise Adapt and Overcome!


Posted By: Scott
Date Posted: February 06 2006 at 9:48pm
Sorry, not Solar Kiln. What I should have said was Solar Still. Just Google "Solar Still" Desert USA is a good site for directions.




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As the Dark Horse Approaches.
Improvise Adapt and Overcome!


Posted By: medicvet
Date Posted: February 08 2006 at 6:40pm
that dry chlorine idea has been the best one I have heard in a long time. Would it be for sale at most pool supply places?


Posted By: bruss01
Date Posted: February 08 2006 at 7:46pm
Yup - just be sure you get plain old calcium hypochlorite with no additives for algae or ph or stabilizer. Cost about 5 bucks per pound here.


Posted By: Penham
Date Posted: February 09 2006 at 9:05pm
The calcium hypochlorite is that sort of like shock for the pool? Or is it something similar? We have a pool, which as long as the electricity is on and can be filtered, I suppose it would be fairly safe to drink? Or would I still want to add this or bleach to the water for drinking? After a couple of days without being filtered (no electricity) I imagine the pool water would start getting yucky. At what point would it not be useable for drinking or cooking? This is my first post here and I have been reading for a couple of days now, just taking all the info in.


Posted By: mom 4 six
Date Posted: February 12 2006 at 11:34am
i have been doing laundry and noticed the number of plastic storage tubs that i have holding christmas decorations and family pictures.  I think that i will transfer some of those items into cardboard boxes for a while and wash these out to store water for cleaning and washing.  that should hold a nice amount  i will just have to be sure i have them where i want to store them before i fill them up.   (weight issues)

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Mom


Posted By: bruss01
Date Posted: February 12 2006 at 12:21pm
Penham, yup that is exactly what it is.  You're right, pool water can start to go downhill in a few days without filtration, but if you have bleach or calcium hypochlorite to add, it will be ok.  You will probably want to filter it also, so you might consider either a camping/backpacking hand pump filter, or something larger (big berkey has been mentioned).  As long as it's treated/filtered, the water in the pool will be useable.


Posted By: RotroShaggy
Date Posted: February 13 2006 at 3:57pm
This may be a stupid question, but I have never heard of anyone talk about whether or not it is possible for H5N1 to infect the water supply.  Is this possible?  Is it possible for the virus to be transported through our water supply, thereby making it unsafe to drink tapwater?  Just curious.

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RotroShaggy


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 13 2006 at 5:57pm

Originally posted by RotroShaggy RotroShaggy wrote:

This may be a stupid question, but I have never heard of anyone talk about whether or not it is possible for H5N1 to infect the water supply.  Is this possible?  Is it possible for the virus to be transported through our water supply, thereby making it unsafe to drink tapwater?  Just curious.

The H5N1 flu virus can survive at cool temperatures in contaminated manure for about three months. One gram of matter has enough virus to infect 1 million birds and the virus can survive in water for upto 4 days at 22oC and for >30 days at 0 deg C (32 degrees F), if not longer.



Posted By: RotroShaggy
Date Posted: February 14 2006 at 6:10am
Thanks, KillerFlu.net.  So, maybe another stupid question, but boiling water would kill the virius?  For how long?  What about a hot shower?  Are we potentially showering ourselves with the virus?  Would the heat of the shower water kill the virus?  These seem like stupid questions, but I've never really thought about it before.  It would be a shame to be all set up to survive and then realize you infected yourself in the bathtub with contaminated city water when you were trying to wash away the virus you were actually bathing in it . . . .

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RotroShaggy


Posted By: Penham
Date Posted: February 14 2006 at 2:03pm
Ok another calcium hypochlorite question. My pool store only carries 73%, is that too high? They only carry big buckets for $77, which is ok cause I will always use it in the pool later, but I don't want to get it if the % is too high to use for drinking water. The other option is Walmart, but they only have the 56% and it has other ingredients, but doesn't list the other ingredients? Or should I keep looking? I can check another pool store, K Mart? Does it absolutely have to be the 65%, I know the earlier post says it must be no more than 65%, why? And there are two different types, both cost the same, both have the same ingredients and %, but one you mix with water first before adding to the water, the other you just add directly to the water, which is better? Thanks for any help.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 19 2006 at 4:31pm
Another water question: we have two bathtubs. One the standard size you find in most apartments, the larger one is quite deep. Can somebody help me figure out the math so I can calculate how much water I can store in them? Thanks much


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 19 2006 at 4:50pm

I found this on calculating water in an aquarium... same principle I would imagine.

http://www.aquariumfish.net/information/aquarium_arithmetic.htm - http://www.aquariumfish.net/information/aquarium_arithmetic. htm

2.  How much Water Does my Aquarium Hold?
The
http://www.aquariumfish.net/information/recommended_treatment.htm#top2 - here to read the Recommended Treatment, which includes adding one drop of Quick Cure for each gallon of water and one Tablespoon of Aquarium Salt for each five gallons of water.  To give your fish the Recommended Treatment you'll need to know how many gallons of water your aquarium holds. Here's how to measure and calculate the volume of your aquarium.
   
     
  • Measure your aquarium from the left edge to the right edge. For example, my aquarium measures 18 inches.
     

  • Measure your aquarium from the bottom edge to the top edge. My aquarium is 12 inches.
     

  • Measure the aquarium along the side from the front edge to the back edge. Mine is 12 inches.
     

  • Multiply the three measurements. I got my small calculator and carefully entered 18 x 12 x 12 = 2592 cubic inches. Then multiply that number by 0.00433 to convert from cubic inches to gallons. I got 11.2 gallons of water in my aquarium.

   

To get a more accurate answer I realized I should have measured inside the aquarium. Measuring inside I get 17.75 x 11.75 x 11.75 = 2450.6, multiplied by 0.00433 is 10.6 gallons. So measuring inside the aquarium instead of outside reduces the volume from 11.2 to 10.6 gallons of water inside my aquarium



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 19 2006 at 4:55pm

  Water goes for $5.00 a gallon after an emergency such as Katrina. Here is a link to a good article about emergency water supplies. Best bet is to use new food grade containers designed for water.

Figure 1-2 gallons per day per person. If someone is sick with H5 they will be losing fluids from every opening. They'll need extra.

Prep-On



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 19 2006 at 4:57pm

OOPPS,

http://waltonfeed.com/self/water.html - http://waltonfeed.com/self/water.html



Posted By: sweets
Date Posted: February 20 2006 at 8:41am
Could someone please tell me how long commercial bottled water stays good in 90 degree temperature? Looking at 2 months of hot summer weather

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I'm not a ribbering Jidiot!
www.exaltedshrimp.com


Posted By: zoe17
Date Posted: February 20 2006 at 2:32pm
It will be fine. I have had bottles in my boat/quad/packs for over a year, did not kill me.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 21 2006 at 9:21pm
Sohia, I just realized that I didn't thank you for the math formula. How rude of me! Thank you very, very much. Now I know I can store another 120 gls. Right now my filled containers are in them (kind of out of sight), but can be filled rapidly. What do you think about the inflatable pools, which can be gotten fairly inexpensivly. I found two different sizes at Walmart which have a cover. I have a covered deck in back, which I'm planning on using for shower/decon area, I think I'd be able to fit the smaller one there, which would give me another 125 gls. Any thoughts/opinions??


Posted By: cosmicpixie
Date Posted: February 22 2006 at 1:54am

for anybody in the UK, EBAY is good for purchasing water storage containers-i found huge plastic water butts with taps on there for 5.99 each plus 10 each postage,and plastic 5L jerry cans for 55pence.

Maybe EBAY has similar bargains on the pages for other countries too.



Posted By: fritz
Date Posted: February 22 2006 at 8:06pm

I've got a gravity filter with just 4 filters, no extras but they can be cleaned with bleach. Does anybody know if I should boil or use bleach first before filtering and then the filter could take out some of the chlorine taste. Although that might not be a good thing because I read if you can't smell the chlorine then it disapated(sp?) & you need to add some more. I have a 55 gal barrell in the garage, empty. Will bring inside and fill on final prep and several cases of Poland Springs which we use instead of tap water now. For 14 yrs. we had R.O. system w.UV and it was really great water. After hurricane Floyd the water by us was no good and we were the only ones I knew in our town who didn't have to boil it. We moved 6 mo. ago and my dogs got really sick from the city water in the new place, so we had to stop using it. Even boiling didn't help.  Now they're good but we wont use it. Wonder what's really in it that most people are drinking. Yuk.



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"I am only one; but still I am one, I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." -- Hellen Keller


Posted By: Mississipp Mama
Date Posted: February 22 2006 at 8:58pm
  Does anyone know how much i can expect to pay to have a hand pump well installed?  If you know of any sites that could give me some info, that would be great.  Does any one have any experience installing these.  Do i need to put some kind of filter on it?


Posted By: corky52
Date Posted: February 24 2006 at 1:38pm

http://www.pwgazette.com/gravity.htm - http://www.pwgazette.com/gravity.htm

Cheap and quick but should work like a champ.  I've used these filters for years and they are great.  Anything down to sheep puddles will clean up through this rig.  Prefilter with anything handy, coffee filters would be ideal, pour through into main holding tank.



Posted By: Andy
Date Posted: February 24 2006 at 4:22pm
Can anyone advise on good water purifiers and filter please.

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I hope I'm just a scare monger...


Posted By: corky52
Date Posted: February 24 2006 at 4:28pm

Andy,

The post above yours. Doulton's are hard to beat!



Posted By: tybaltlives
Date Posted: February 27 2006 at 3:09pm

Hi Everyone:  I have about 45 gallons of water stored in drums in the garage.  I figured that was enough because we have a swimming pool - and I was just going to use the water in there (boiled or otherwise purified).

However, just this morning I caught two ducks who had overnighted in the pool.  Major bummer.  Now I am thinking that I need to really store more water because the pool water could easily become contaminated.

Just wanted everyone else to think about this too.

Thanks,

R



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 27 2006 at 9:15pm
I was thinking of filling several large gargage containers with tap water. I have 50 cases of water for drinking plus 20 cases cans of juice .   I will also fill up every container I can find in the house.


Posted By: fritz
Date Posted: February 27 2006 at 10:51pm
There are more questions than answers on this thread. I fear we are not that clear on the water solutions. Just not that easy, or cheap solutions I guess. Many challenges with this.  :>{

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"I am only one; but still I am one, I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." -- Hellen Keller


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 01 2006 at 8:52pm
Walmart has some inflatable pools in various price ranges. I'm considering one which will hold over 3,900 gallons for about $200. Has a cover so it should be safe. 


Posted By: sbulldog
Date Posted: March 02 2006 at 11:32am
Can anyone who purchased collapsable 5 gallon containers tell me if I need to purchase a spigot for each one, or can the same spigot be used over and over?


Posted By: jtg1969
Date Posted: March 02 2006 at 12:10pm

I found this on the EPA's web site

 

http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html

 

CHLORINE METHODS

Chlorine Bleach: When boiling is not practical, chemical disinfection should be used. Common household bleach contains a chlorine compound that will disinfect water. The procedure to be followed is usually written on the label. When the necessary procedure is not given, find the percentage of available chlorine on the label and use the information in the following tabulation as a guide.

Available Chlorine

Drops per Quart of Clear Water

1%

10

4-6%

2

7-10%

1

(If strength is unknown, add ten drops per quart of water. Double amount of chlorine for cloudy or colored water or water that is extremely cold.)

The treated water should be mixed thoroughly and allowed to stand, preferably covered, for 30 minutes. The water should have a slight chlorine odor; if not, repeat the dosage and allow the water to stand for an additional 15 minutes. If the treated water has too strong a chlorine taste, it can be made more pleasing by allowing the water to stand exposed to the air for a few hours or by pouring it from one clean container to another several times.

Granular Calcium Hypochlorite. Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately 1/4 ounce) for each two gallons of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 mg/L, since the calcium hypochlorite has an available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 oz.) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the water as described above.

Chlorine Tablets.Chlorine tablets containing the necessary dosage for drinking water disinfection can be purchased in a commercially prepared form. These tablets are available from drug and sporting goods stores and should be used as stated in the instructions. When instructions are not available, use one tablet for each quart of water to be purified.



Posted By: Sunset
Date Posted: March 02 2006 at 12:15pm
              OK, I WILL PUT THIS QUESTION HERE, AND I HAVE ONE ON THE FOOD ALSO...CAN YOU PUT WATER INTO GALV. STEEL GARBAGE CANS [NEW ONES] AND PUT SOMETHING ON THE SIDE TO MAKE THE WATER  SHUT ON AND OFF?..........SUNSET


Posted By: jtg1969
Date Posted: March 02 2006 at 12:25pm

It may be a good idea, if you are planning on using chlorine or other chemical disinfectants, to use an activated carbon filter prior to use to filter out the resultant chlorine and carcinogenic THM's. 

Please see below:

Disinfection

http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Disinfection - Disinfection with aggressive chemicals like http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Chlorination - chlorine or ozone is normally the last step in purifying drinking water. Water is disinfected to destroy any http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Pathogens - pathogens which passed through the filters. Possible pathogens include http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Viruses - viruses , http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Bacteria - bacteria including http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Escherichia_coli - Escherichia coli and http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Shigella - Shigella , and http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Protozoans - protozoans including http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Giardia_lamblia - Giardia lamblia and http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Cryptosporidium - Cryptosporidium . Many water systems intentionally leave residual disinfection agents in the water after exiting the plant so it travels throughout the distribution system. The most common disinfection method is some form of http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Chlorine - chlorine such as http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Chlorine_gas - chlorine gas , http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Sodium_hypochlorite - sodium hypochlorite , http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Chloramine - chloramine or http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Chlorine_dioxide - chlorine dioxide . The water and chemical mix are allowed to sit in a large tank, called a clear well. The water must sit in the clear well to ensure that the water is in contact with the disinfectant for a minimum amount of time because it takes time to inactivate the harmful microbes. Chlorine is a strong oxidant that kills many microorganisms and remains in the water to provide continuing disinfection. Other disinfection methods include using ozone which acts very rapidly or Ultra Violet light that is almost instantaneous also inactivate pathogens.

Chlorine gas and sodium hypochlorite are the most commonly used disinfectants, because they are inexpensive and easy to manage. They are effective in killing bacteria, but have limited effectiveness against protozoans that form cysts in water (Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium, both of which are pathogenic). Chlorine gas and sodium hypochlorite both have strong residuals in the water once it enters the distribution system.

The main drawback in using chlorine gas or sodium hypochlorite is that these react with organic compounds in the water to form potentially harmful levels of the chemical by-products http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Trihalomethanes - trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids, both of which are carcinogenic and regulated by the U.S. EPA. The formation of THMs and haloacetic acids is minimized by effective removal of as many organics from the water as possible before disinfection and/or by adding ammonia immediately after chemical disinfection is completed. Formerly, it was common practice to chlorinate the water at the beginning of the purification process, but this practice has mostly been abandoned to minimize the production of THMs.

Chloramines are not as effective disinfectants compared to chlorine gas or sodium hypochlorite, but do not form THMs or haloacetic acids. They are typically used only in stored and distributed treated water. An example of this sort is proceeses using http://www.avianflutalk.com/wiki/Ozone - ozone for primary disinfection which is very quickly accomplished then using monochloramine to create a residual level of disinfectant in the water. Chlorine dioxide is another rapid acting disinfectant against bacteria but unlike ozone it leaves a long lasting residual in the water. Despite these beneficial characteristics, it is rarely used because it may creates excessive amounts of chlorate and chlorite, both of which are regulated to low allowable levels.



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 02 2006 at 12:37pm

Sunset,

You might be able to drill in hole in your galv can and pass a threaded PVC nipple through.  You would silicon both sides and use a pvc nut on each side of the can to sinch up into the silicon.  Let it dry then attach your spickot to the outside.  Drill your hole close to the bottom but leave room for the nut and probably a washer.  I don't know if that would work, I would probably try it on a small (cheap can) if possible so if it does not work you are not out as much.  Someone else may have already made something similar and hopefully can better help.



Posted By: delphina
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 10:43am
I've got a question about river water: I live right near the Danube (dead swans, I know). Could I get water when needed from there (it's pretty clean, as rivers go). What if I filtered and boiled it --- could we drink it then?
Thanks for any info on this!!


Posted By: Enumclaw,WA
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 10:58am
I know your not supposed to heat or weld galvanized metal because it let's of toxic fumes. Also if you put it on your roof whatever leaches out of it kills the moss. So I don't think I would use galvanized anything for my drinking water.

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RB


Posted By: virusil
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 11:13am
get yourself distilled water,it is pure and store indefnitly.

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ignorance.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 12:39pm

Delphina, the water will be safe as long as you can boil it. The danger is more if you can't. You can make it safe by mixing in bleach, enough so can smell it a little. Then let it sit for a few hours to make sure the bleach has had time to do its job.

Good luck.



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 3:04pm
I'm thinking about buying 32 gal plastic garbage cans to put at each corner of our house to collect rainwater. I'll cut a hole in the lids, and run the  downspouts right thought the lid (no duck poop.)

Does anyone think the plastic that the garage cans are made of would be a problem.

I'm starting to feel paranoid.






Posted By: virusil
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 3:06pm
YES THE PLASTIC CAN BE TOXIC FOR US AS WELL BIRDS POOOOOOOOOO

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ignorance.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 3:07pm
Darn! Ducks or geese could/would still poop on the roof! We are located on a AAA travel route for geese.

ARGH!


Posted By: NawtyBits
Date Posted: March 03 2006 at 5:55pm
Originally posted by RotroShaggy RotroShaggy wrote:

Thanks, KillerFlu.net.  So, maybe another stupid question, but boiling water would kill the virius?  For how long?  What about a hot shower?  Are we potentially showering ourselves with the virus?  Would the heat of the shower water kill the virus?  These seem like stupid questions, but I've never really thought about it before.  It would be a shame to be all set up to survive and then realize you infected yourself in the bathtub with contaminated city water when you were trying to wash away the virus you were actually bathing in it . . . .


Boiling water for at least 10 minutes should kill viruses.

You hot water heater only heats to 120 to 130F, and this is NOT hot enough to kill a virus.  I would suspect that if the viruses are killed at the water plant, then you have bigger problems.  As for viruses in your well, then again you still have a bigger problem,i.e, it is probably already contaminated with something else.

nawty


Posted By: htpp
Date Posted: March 04 2006 at 10:14am

I called my Wal-Mart bakery and they have 3 gallon buckets that they discard after they are done and are for sale for $1.00 each.  Don't know why I didn't call months ago!! Anyway, I was wondering since these are washed would these be good to fill up with water for drinking water?

 

Thanks!



Posted By: NawtyBits
Date Posted: March 04 2006 at 8:25pm
Originally posted by htpp htpp wrote:

I called my Wal-Mart bakery and they have 3 gallon buckets that they discard after they are done and are for sale for $1.00 each.  Don't know why I didn't call months ago!! Anyway, I was wondering since these are washed would these be good to fill up with water for drinking water?

 

Thanks!



Sort of.  For some reason, containers seem to retain the taste of what they originally carried.  When I get containers that held stuff that I dont want my other stuff to taste like, I soak them in water and baking soda.  The lids are the hardest to rid of odors.

When push comes to shove, why risk it when water containers are so cheap and readily available.....

nawty


Posted By: striper
Date Posted: March 05 2006 at 5:54am
I am just buying Poland Spring water in 1 liter and 1 1/2 liter sizes. So far got about 100 liters which is roughy 40 gallons. May be I will buy some gallon size bottles too. No intention of storing water in any other way.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 05 2006 at 5:32pm

I was thinking of platic gargage bins new and keeping them in the laundry room.  On wooden skids .  i can fill them from   the laundry facet.

I can fill these  in hours  Thisto me appeared the cheapest way to get water in large quantities

I like the ides of adding a faucit

Or even a childs pool with lid in the basement.  for extra water.  Plus I have bottled water and can juice

Should they be filled now



Posted By: Valgard
Date Posted: March 06 2006 at 6:26pm
Please forgive my urgency in this post, but I think it is warranted, when this BF "thing" hits, you will have little time to save yourself from imminent disaster.  Water is imperative for life! You will be dead in 72 hours without it!

Your water heater has water, I suggest flushing it now to remove all the minerals which collect at the bottom, your bathtub should be filled when your town is hit. AND ANYTHING that holds water should be filled.

Walmart buckets may have an "off" taste, so what! Consider them a blessing. Garbage cans, water bed mattresses, kids wading pools, even milk jugs should be saved.

I'm so tired of hearing negative posts saying this thing or that is not good enough.  Any thing that holds water could save your life, we'll worry about the off tastes later, or the possible leaching of plastics and such.  Small worry when you are facing sudden death.  Get going and get going fast, water is life!   

-------------
Do Right and Fear Not


Posted By: GingerPluss
Date Posted: March 07 2006 at 5:07pm

I did go to Sam's Club this week..they have a Reverse Osmosis Water Filtration Unit that cleans up to 1000 gallons of water ( 4 filters) for less than 160 dollars... Have not done this kind of purchase before... but feel it may be well worth  it .

 



Posted By: calendula
Date Posted: March 07 2006 at 5:13pm
Ginger:  You might want to check into "StearyPEn" it purifies water by using UVL, kills bacteria and viruses, as oppose to just all the bacteria.  It is about $150.00 it is the size of an oversize pen, that is what I invested you just have to replace batteries.

-------------
I am not here to reason, I am here to create"


Posted By: GingerPluss
Date Posted: March 08 2006 at 5:56pm
  Thanks DancingBear... where did you find this StearyPen??  I have never heard of anything like it.  


Posted By: bohemians
Date Posted: March 09 2006 at 7:18am
Hi Ya'll
Another option for safe water is to distill it. We bought a 'Waterwise Non Electric Water Distiller' a few months ago. It produces up to 16 gallons of distilled water per day. There are also free plans on the internet for making your own still from an old pressure cooker. Low pressure distilling may or may not, kill all viruses, but used with chlorine it should. It certainly removes contaminates.
Some one asked about putting in a water well- it depends on the depth of the water in your area, and the type of soil you have. If you plan on only going down to the surface water, you may be able to drill it yourself, if you don't have layers of rock, gravel, shale, ect. I've drilled 2 wells by hand using a 'Seymour' auger post hole digger. Pitcher pumps only work down to 20 feet  or so, if 20-40 feet they usally work if you add a foot valve. Any deeper than that, you will need a deep well setup- pump cylender at the bottom and a pump with a sucker rod. The easy way is to use an auger 2 inches in diameter and drill to the water sand- then drop a well point with a foot valve mounted on 1.25 diameter pipe. It is physicaly demanding work.
There may be someone in your area with a portable well driller who would do it for a few humdred dollars, you just have find them.
Sorry for the long post, hope it may be useful.


Posted By: calendula
Date Posted: March 09 2006 at 7:31am
Ginger:  You can go online an check their website >Stearypen, it will tell you all about it , then make your decision as to what will work best for you.  IT could also be found at BassProShops ( outdoor store) website.  The issue with regular filters it wil only remove bacteria, and some other organic material, this UVL system kills viruses.  I would also suggest read all about the consumption of distilled water for long periods of time, in the long run according to the experts will do more harm to your system.  An excerpt> by Dr. Elson Haas, MD. on distilled water from his book "Staying HEalthy wth nutrition"...."   Distilled water contains no minerals---distilled water takes out everything except volatile chemicals--, therefore when consumed, it tends to attract minerals and toxins to balance with other body fluids.  The regular consumption of distilled water, can cause mineral defficincies"..   let me know if I could be of further help.

-------------
I am not here to reason, I am here to create"


Posted By: Canto
Date Posted: March 09 2006 at 9:25am
I think the reverse osmosis filter is a great triple filter system that removes heavy metals, chlorine and such and I would love to have one in my home but I to have opted for the UV steri-pen, no filters needed but only good until I run out of double A bats. The reverse osmosis may allow a few microbs to slip through and for every gallon filtered 2-3 are wasted. Still a very good choice, requires no electricity, membranes good for 2-3 years and few contaminates can penetrate.


Posted By: Mississipp Mama
Date Posted: March 09 2006 at 7:19pm
  .  Hi Bohemains,I'm intrested in the waterwise distiller you bought.  Can you tell me where to buy it and possible cost.?  Will I still need one if i have a manual well dug.  The well will be at least 80 feet.  Thanks for your help.


Posted By: redcloud
Date Posted: March 10 2006 at 2:39am
Has anyone ever heard of these purification products, or have any opinion as
to their efficacy?

Aerobic 07

Oxy-Stabile

Aqua Mira Chlorine Dioxide

The first two are supposed to "selectively kill" the bad bugs, while leaving
the "beneficial" ones intact, whatever that means.


Posted By: bohemians
Date Posted: March 10 2006 at 8:09am
Hi Mississipp Mamma
We got our distiller straight from the factory, online. I think it was around 250, you can make your own for almost nothing. We got it just in case  we had to purify water from a ditch or some other source. You can shop around for the cheapest price- just Google 'distilling water' or water distillers'.  You should not need to distill well water from 80 feet, the company that drills your well will have a sample tested for safety, or they will tell where you can have it done. Always have well water tested once a year to make sure it's safe to drink. There is lots of info on the web regarding water wells, you will find it very helpful.  Another idea is a steam juicer, they cost much less and can be converted to a distiller in an emergency, plus you can make your own fresh juice year round for almost nothing. Hope this helps you. Best wishes


Posted By: Mississipp Mama
Date Posted: March 10 2006 at 8:01pm
  Bohemains thanks for the information on distillers.


Posted By: tonseck
Date Posted: March 10 2006 at 8:17pm
If a well is drilled and cased, as most rural homes have, the groundwater from that well will be pure and uncontaminated.  If the power goes out, the well is still there, and you can pull the pump out and manually haul water out of it.  Tedious, but better than drinking untreated surface water.  The earth itself is a perfect filter for bad bugs.

For those of you using chlorine, please realize that chlorine does not kill EVERYTHING.  Certain protozoans that are ubiquitous in the environment, like Giardia and Cryptosporidium, are not touched by chlorination.  Ozone, UV and reverse osmosis are the best bets.


-------------
Don't be afraid to be afraid; it keeps you on your toes.


Posted By: Rocky
Date Posted: March 11 2006 at 12:51am
Electricity outage and water availability???
If the electricity is out x number of hours or days, does this mean that there
will be no water coming through to your house? I realize the water will
probably not be properly chlorinated, but will it even be flowing?

Rocky

-------------
Prepare for the Unexpected!
Rocky
http://www.homeemergencyusa.com - http://www.homeemergencyusa.com


Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 11 2006 at 6:01am
We have our own well so when the electric is out, we have no water. I don't know how city water works with no power.

-------------
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: tybaltlives
Date Posted: March 12 2006 at 7:31pm
Hi.  We are on city water now but about to move to country property with a well.  I plan to add a 1000 gal cistern and a generator to operate the pump when the power is out.  Fortunately, there is a spring nearby for when things really get bad.


Posted By: Hope
Date Posted: March 12 2006 at 11:54pm
I'm reading a lot about using tubs and buckets to gather drinking water.  I've just been buying tons of bottled water at Costco every week.  It's cheap and convenient.  What am I missing?

-------------
Hope


Posted By: arabesqua
Date Posted: March 13 2006 at 3:10am
I live on a farm 30 miles from town and have a well ive been looking into a barrel pump with no electric we would have no water but this looked like something that would work any ideas? what i havent figured out is it would need an adaptor to fit a hose the adaptor on it is way to big for a hose has anyone have any ideas on that?..thanks ara


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 14 2006 at 4:18pm



http://www.region.waterloo.on.ca/web/region.nsf/8ef02c0fded0c82a85256e590071a3ce/ef0dac1e32543d6185256b05005a2bfa!OpenDocument - http://www.region.waterloo.on.ca/web/region.nsf/8ef02c0fded0 c82a85256e590071a3ce/ef0dac1e32543d6185256b05005a2bfa!OpenDo cument


Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 14 2006 at 8:41pm

Rick~very interesting that they are having a Rain Barrel distribution day. I have never heard of this before.

I do have a question for you engineer types. How would you go about constructing your own water barrels out of plastic 55 gallon drums? I know you would need a screen on the top to avoid having bugs and mosquitoes from laying eggs in the water. How would you secure it on the barrel?

 



-------------
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: Pebbles
Date Posted: March 16 2006 at 8:32pm

Cost comparison for water containers:

gotwater2.com:  350 gal aquatank $189

watertanks.com  325 gal  $489.44

I bought mine from gotwater2.com.  S&H was $21.90 for 2 and excellent service.  They were shipped the day after I ordered.



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Blackbird singing in the dead of the night. Take these broken wings and learn to fly. All my life. You were only waiting for this moment to arise.


Posted By: sheilad1
Date Posted: March 16 2006 at 11:36pm

The tanks sound better than the barrells but I already have 4 55 gallon barrells.

Does the water need to be treated (with chlorine) when filled or as used? - How often must it be emptied and refilled to prevent contamination or can chlorine always be added to keep it usable?

Thanks!

Sheila



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 17 2006 at 12:28pm
Hi, sheilad1. If you're barrels are already filled and closed, they are perfectly safe. Some people choose to drain and re-fill every six months, because it improves the taste. Hope this helps


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 17 2006 at 12:31pm
Oh, I forgot. An less expensive solution for water storage are inflatable pools at Walmart/K-mart etc. Found a large one for about $200 which hold over 3800 gallons, comes with a cover. Perfect if you have a backyard.


Posted By: sheilad1
Date Posted: March 17 2006 at 12:57pm

Femvet - that helps a great deal, thanks.

-Sheila



Posted By: DragonRider
Date Posted: March 17 2006 at 11:47pm
Some of you may want to consider this.  This is my choice if boiling, bleach, etc are not available.  Treats up to 1 gallon at a time, that is ALOT easier than pumping a water filter/purifier to fill.

http://www.rei.com/product/47792759.htm?vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPIN%20G_TOC - http://www.rei.com/product/47792759.htm?vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPIN G_TOC
Military grade and in widespread use in many water systems already.

John




Posted By: Thomas Angel
Date Posted: March 18 2006 at 12:55am
Originally posted by Femvet Femvet wrote:

Oh, I forgot. An less expensive solution for water storage are inflatable pools at Walmart/K-mart etc. Found a large one for about $200 which hold over 3800 gallons, comes with a cover. Perfect if you have a backyard.
Now that, by God, is water supply!

-------------
I LIKE SCARY RIDES


Posted By: sheilad1
Date Posted: March 18 2006 at 7:07am

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=3651447 - http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=3651447  holds over 5500 gallons  $297.00

How safe is this water for drinking once it has been sitting out in the yard?  What is the best procedure for purifying it to make it drinkable?  I am confused about adding bleach because city water tends to have chlorine in it.  Can someone post simple directions yet again.  There seems to be conflicting information all over and I would love to have one set of directions posted in the house.

Thanks!

-Sheila

 



Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 18 2006 at 2:26pm

sheila~I have been looking for some information about whether or not you need to treat water that already has chlorine in it. I have not found any information on this yet but I will keep looking.
Maybe someone here already knows the answer to this and could post it for us???

 



-------------
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: Penham
Date Posted: March 18 2006 at 5:46pm
If your pool is not getting filtered it will get nasty pretty quickly. Our pool holds 12,000 gal, we use chlorine tabs (run the filter at least 8 hours a day) in it and also use shock, both have algaecide in it. I checked into calcium hypochlorite for shocking, but according to the pool store that should only be used in concrete pools, not vinyl liner which is what we have. If there is no chlorine it will start getting algae in 3-4 days even being filtered, ours does anyway, in hot weather. I think if we end up having to drink pool water, I will boil it first, will try to just use it for washing up, laundry, cleaning, if we can keep it clean and filtered and use for flushing if we can't.


Posted By: bruss01
Date Posted: March 20 2006 at 6:55am

Hey folks,

Regarding making water drinkable using dry calcium hypochlorite (aka swimming pool shock) I went back and re-read the formula posted on page 1 of this thread.  It is pretty sketchy, so the http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/faq/emerg.html - following from the EPA  needs to be added to it -

"Granular Calcium Hypochlorite. Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately 1/4 ounce) for each two gallons of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 mg/L, since the calcium hypochlorite has an available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 oz.) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the water as described below.

The treated water should be mixed thoroughly and allowed to stand, preferably covered, for 30 minutes. The water should have a slight chlorine odor; if not, repeat the dosage and allow the water to stand for an additional 15 minutes. If the treated water has too strong a chlorine taste, it can be made more pleasing by allowing the water to stand exposed to the air for a few hours or by pouring it from one clean container to another several times. "

Ok, a lot of people don't have a 12.5 gallon container laying around, so let's break it down. To make two gallons of the bleach, one heaping teaspoon of the calcium hypochlorite goes into 2 gallons of water.  To make drinkable water, 2.5 tablespoons of the bleach goes into 1 gallon of water.  Let stand covered 30 minutes, aerate to taste.

Penham - maybe use the pool for your bulk water storage, and treat it on an "as needed" basis, 5 gallons at a time?  Just a thought.



Posted By: sheilad1
Date Posted: March 20 2006 at 7:05am

Thanks for this breakdown it is VERY helpful.

You gave us a formula for bleach and for drinkable water.  What is the formula for bleach/water for disinfecting (goggles. shoes, etc.)

Thanks again!

-Sheila



Posted By: 40acrediesel
Date Posted: March 20 2006 at 12:00pm
Don't forget to get one of those 4 or 5 gallon solar showers.  You can get them at any of the survival websites like Nitro-Pak or even at Wal-Mart. 


Posted By: 40acrediesel
Date Posted: March 20 2006 at 12:02pm

Also, the best deal I have found on 55 gallon fda approved water barrels is at South Summit --

 

http://www.southsummit.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=49 - http://www.southsummit.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=49



Posted By: bruss01
Date Posted: March 21 2006 at 8:02pm
WHAT?!!!   $50.00 ?!
 
That's the "best deal" you could find?  I must be a bargain hunter then when I found http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-Barrel-Barrels-Used-55-Gallon-Barrels-TH_W0QQitemZ7602818580QQcategoryZ1267QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem - these  for $15.
 
http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-Barrel-Barrels-Used-55-Gallon-Barrels-TH_W0QQitemZ7602818580QQcategoryZ1267QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem#ebayphotohosting"> http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-Barrel-Barrels-Used-55-Gallon-Barrels-TH_W0QQitemZ7602818580QQcategoryZ1267QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem#ebayphotohosting"> http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-Barrel-Barrels-Used-55-Gallon-Barrels-TH_W0QQitemZ7602818580QQcategoryZ1267QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem#ebayphotohosting"> http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-Barrel-Barrels-Used-55-Gallon-Barrels-TH_W0QQitemZ7602818580QQcategoryZ1267QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem#ebayphotohosting">
 
Just add 2 quarts of the sanitizing solution to each barrel, then fill it up with water.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 22 2006 at 6:06am
Can you sterislise DRINKING water with chlorine, I don't care about  water for washing etc being sterile.  How much bleach do you use, and are the surfactants in the bleach you buy at supermarkets actually poisonous?


Posted By: bruss01
Date Posted: March 23 2006 at 3:06pm
Beth -  see my post above.  Liquid bleach deteriorates over time, it's 50% degraded in 1 year, worthless in 2 years.  Dry pool shock lasts 10 years or more in dry form.  You want the plain calcium hypochlorite, no algaecides etc.  THIS IS FOR DRINKING WATER.  Water for washing needs to be clean, imaginie going to the trouble to sanitize your drinking water, but putting that clean water into a glass you washed with unsanitary water?  Might just as well have drunk the dirty water and saved yourself the trouble.  Yes, anything besides sodium hypochlorite in the laundry bleach has toxicity and you will taste it too.  You can get plain calcium hypochlorite at any pool supply store.


Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 23 2006 at 3:12pm
We have two 55 gallon drums that have spigots (faucets) attached to them. We are wanting to get a couple more and were thinking about purchasing a pump to get the water out. Does anyone know where you can purchase these affordably? We could put faucets on the new ones but that requires laying the barrel on it's side and you lose some water storage that way. The ones that have faucets on them now, we lay on their side inside a homemade stand.

-------------
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: redcloud
Date Posted: March 23 2006 at 9:54pm
Dreamer,

For drums try:

http://www.bascousa.com/store/item.aspxDEPARTMENT_ID=73&ITEM_ID=554

For cheap siphon pumps try:

http://www.bascousa.com/store/item.aspx?ITEM_ID=165

For faucets try:

http://www.bascousa.com/store/index.aspx?DEPARTMENT_ID=145


Posted By: 40acrediesel
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 5:25am
Sorry bruss01, let me clarify - New drums - I am a little leary of buying blue used FDA drums off ebay.  Never quite sure what they may have had in them in the past, and whether rinsing them with soap & water may or may not clean them.  People get burned all the time on ebay.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 5:30am
Originally posted by Daydreamer Daydreamer wrote:

Rick~very interesting that they are having a Rain Barrel distribution day. I have never heard of this before.

I do have a question for you engineer types. How would you go about constructing your own water barrels out of plastic 55 gallon drums? I know you would need a screen on the top to avoid having bugs and mosquitoes from laying eggs in the water. How would you secure it on the barrel?

 

 
I wonder if screening would work...the kind that is on your windows..it is pretty inexpensive and you could use a bungy cord around the barrel to hold it place...


Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 5:35am
Thanks redcloud for the links. I'll check into them. Muskrat, I was thinking along those lines for the rain barrels. We haven't been getting much rain around here but I figure having a couple on hand can't hurt.
 
As far as used plastic drums go, we live in a rural area and we always find someone selling these. Yes, we have to wash them out but the blue ones are always food grade so some soapy bleach water usually does the trick. We can usually get them for $10 or less a piece.


-------------
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 5:39am
Daydreamer I read somewhere the you should not use soap on plastics that will be used for storing water..as the soap still leaves a residue behind...just use warm to hot water to clean the plastics out...even the 2 litre pop bottles only use warm water to rinse....


Posted By: oknut
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 6:11am
I have two 40 gallon rain barrels that I purchased a year or so ago from Gardeners Supply. We have ours positioned under the downspouts on our patio cover because we had washout issues. Because the water they collect is runoff from the house roof and patio cover, I wouldn't want to drink or cook with it unless it was boiled, distilled or treated first. Birds poop on the roof. There are several merchants who sell rain barrel kits that you can use to convert ordinary drums into rain barrels. I've considered setting up at least one more barrel out in the open somewhere so it wouldn't contain roof runoff, but even if we can use our 80 gallons for bathing or laundry once it's treated - it will help.


Posted By: Bladerunner
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 8:42am
I have been doing research to have a well drilled on my property.  Keep in mind this information is based on SE Virginia, Norfolk area.
 
First, I live in a subdivision of Norfolk called Larchmont This is an older neighborhood with most of the homes built in the 1920s and surprisingly many have wells, mostly for lawn irrigation.
 
My wife contacted a local well drilling company and their preliminary phone quotes are:
 
1. They will drill the well down to 50 feet for $500 and after that it's a rate per foot (the wife didn't get that information)
2. They will install a system complete with electric pump, well casing, pressure tank, and faucet for around $1700, including drilling (50 feet)
3. The city of Norfolk will not issue a permit to drill for potable water, but if they did it would be an extra $300 to seal the well from outside contaminants.  We are going back to the company and ask if they could still do the work constructing a well as a high quality water source but not "for drinking". Either, that or I will just plan on filtering/boiling the water.
 
I am making some assumptions (bird flu related), that electricity will still be available, but if it isn't I can run my generator each day enough to replenish my barrel and water can storage.  I will probablly also look into how easily the well could be converted to a hand pump and just keep a "pitcher pump" around just in case.
 
Even if the Pandemic doesn't hit, I will use the well for watering the lawn, car washing etc.  My water bill in the summer months generally increases by $100/month so the well should pay for itself in a year.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 4:19pm
Hi Daydreamer!   You could get some garden hose and siphon the last of the water out so as not to waste it.  You could also get a pump in a garden supplies shop they sell them for people to use in their ponds and fountains. Or maybe people use handpumps for baling out boats - just a thought.   Also there used to be a kind of cheap handpump you could get in the UK called a stirrup pump.  You could try googling that, though I haven't seen any for a while.  Happy hunting.  Love Beth



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