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ELECTRICITY

Printed From: Avian Flu Talk
Category: Home & Family Planning
Forum Name: Electricity and Solar Energy
Forum Description: (Electricity & solar energy)
URL: http://www.avianflutalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=970
Printed Date: May 21 2018 at 2:10am


Topic: ELECTRICITY
Posted By: Guests
Subject: ELECTRICITY
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 4:49pm

Important information about electricity and alternate means of power generation.

If we don't have power.

Generators.

Solar Power.




Replies:
Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 5:10pm

candles for light

propane tank  for cooking

generator for electricity

batteries for  cd players radio

in short as many sourses of power for many diferent things



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 8:35pm

Issues likely to effect electricity:

Storms throughout the year bring down power lines.  Who will repair them and how long will it take if they do have repair crews?  Will they have the spare parts to effect the repairs?  This will be local outages, but if it's your locale it won't matter to you how wide spread it is.

Will the fuel to run the power plants be available?  Will the manpower be available to run the plant?

The power grid is a complicated interconnected web.  Bring down 3 or 4 nodes and we may end up with a cascade outage.



Posted By: TNbebo408
Date Posted: January 29 2006 at 10:35pm
Get some driveway solar lights, they cheap and work OK, also use a 12 volt jump start unit to power 12 volt lights, take the dome lights from a junk car for this, use a solar charger to keep the unit charged up.

If no one else has lights, the darkness will be your best friend, don't light up and become obvious.

Store gas after treatment, in dark cool place. Sunlight degrades gas, and vaporizes it also.

Only run genset enough to keep freezer frozen. Store just enough gas to maintain freezer operation till the freezer is empty.


Posted By: libbyalex
Date Posted: January 30 2006 at 6:25am
Simple, I know. When it gets dark outside, go to bed. When dawn breaks, wake up! Adapt schedule to the rising and setting of the sun. -- Libby


Posted By: Spoon
Date Posted: January 30 2006 at 7:46pm
You can cover your windows with blackout material or those silver energency blankets.  That would also keep your home warmer.

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It's not so much the apocalypse... but the credit card bills ;-)


Posted By: Ella Fitzgerald
Date Posted: February 01 2006 at 11:12pm

Okay, I live in south central US and it gets pretty darn hot during summer time so what is a realistic energy source for an air conditioner?

I foresee that a refridgerator is a priority for electricity if you have it.

 



Posted By: Spoon
Date Posted: February 02 2006 at 7:05am

Ella,

Standard A/Cs and Refrigerators are expensive to power off-grid.  I have very little knowledge about water or wind power, but have been researching solar for the past several months.

http://www.backwoodssolar.com/ - Backwoods Solar was a big help.  They start with the basics and then breakdown several popular sample systems.  You can see what it takes, and costs, for your power needs.

http://www.sunfrost.com/ - Sunfrost makes the best line of high-efficient refrigerators/freezers that work well with solar power.



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It's not so much the apocalypse... but the credit card bills ;-)


Posted By: willow41
Date Posted: February 02 2006 at 1:32pm

I have battery operated Family size Coleman laterns. Candles of all sizes, especially pillar sizes. I bought a battery operated Coleman tv/radio/siren/lamp at Target. Plus, loads of batteries.

We also have a generator that we run when power is out, but it is loud. And we only have so much gas. So not really relying on this.

Firewood, real and store bought.

You can purchasing propane heaters to use for the winter. Will find these in camping supply sections at stores or online.

I still want to get solar battery chargers and batteries,  and a solar powered/ crank radio.



Posted By: corky52
Date Posted: February 02 2006 at 5:08pm
Two solar panels, four 6v golf cart batteries, 5 gallons of distilled water, several inverters and careful selection of electronic equipment.  Boondock camping 101.  Also add cheap fluorescent lights from Wally World.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 03 2006 at 10:28pm
Here is something to investigate if you are considering powering your house with a generator: 

http://members.rennlist.org/warren/generator.html

http://www.imsasafety.org/journal/marapr/ma5.htm





Posted By: Ella Fitzgerald
Date Posted: February 04 2006 at 3:11pm

Okay, I have ordered a couple of the solar panels below and need someone to teach me how to convert these to produce power. I have put the description of the solar panels below. I have no experience with solar power and hoping someone can help direct me through this.

 Thanks in advance!

12 Volt 12"x12" Solar Panel

 

Power about 3-4 Watts Construction glass plate
Voltage 14-18 Open Circuit Connectors Screw Terminals
Current 250-350 ma Short Circuit Mfg. Chronar in New Jersey
Condition never used, surplus Frame none

Includes 1 Amp Blocking Diode and Power Terminals.

Generate Electricity from the Sun!

An environmentally friendly and cost effective way to produce electricity wherever you are. Perfect for powering electronic devices and charging NIMH and NICAD batteries. The solar panels can be connected in series to increase the voltage, or connected in parallel to increase the current (amps).

Ideal for:

  • Solar Energy Experiments
  • 12v battery charging for your car, boat motor, golf cart, RV, tractor, truck
  • Providing portable power
  • Power up small fans, pumps, lights, radios, cellular phones, fax, and laptop computers
  • Camping, playing at the beach, vacation home, boating, fishing, picnicking, farming, trolling, hunting, game feeders, and gardening.

These are surplus production panels.  There are surface blemishes or color variations on the front or back of the panel. This does not effect the power output. The panels produce the power indicated in the table above at noon on a cool, clear, sunny day. The solar panels look like a piece of black glass on one side and have a conductive silver coating on the other side.

Each solar panel includes a 1 amp blocking diode, clip on screw terminals and instructions. The blocking diode keeps connected batteries from discharging (loosing power) throught the solar panel at night. 



Posted By: Enumclaw,WA
Date Posted: February 06 2006 at 11:00am
Here's a link for making power using a bicycle and a automotive Alternator. I ordered the parts needed so if I have to, I have them on hand to build this for recharging batteries. Also so I get my exercise when we are hold up at home. Should also be real quiet.
http://www.c-realevents.demon.co.uk/altgen/altpedgen.htm

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RB


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: February 06 2006 at 11:32am

Originally posted by Enumclaw,WA Enumclaw,WA wrote:

Here's a link for making power using a bicycle and a automotive Alternator. I ordered the parts needed so if I have to, I have them on hand to build this for recharging batteries. Also so I get my exercise when we are hold up at home.

Oh MAN - You are screwing me up!  All along I've been thinking "The Omega Man" and now you tell me the plot is "Soylent Green."

Dammit.



Posted By: Enumclaw,WA
Date Posted: February 06 2006 at 11:44am
Yeah, The plot thickins. Bigtime

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RB


Posted By: zoe17
Date Posted: February 06 2006 at 7:45pm

For those that have a portable gas generator and a limited amount of gasoline storage. A adapter kit that allows you to use gas,propane,natural gas on most portable gennys.

 

http://www.propane-generators.com/a-c_kits.htm#tri-fuel - http://www.propane-generators.com/a-c_kits.htm#tri-fuel



Posted By: JaxMax
Date Posted: March 21 2006 at 2:38pm
Here in Florida we have had numerous electrical outages with each hurricane. We have a 5000 watt Honda generator which is superb, but we actually use  the 12 volt batteries and inverters more.
 
An inverter is a device that converts 12 volt (car battery) to A/C or household power. An inverter is the size of a small box of Kleenex tissues. Semi truck drivers use them to power appliances and they are used on boats. An inverter runs small wattage 500-750 watt household appliances. (Small 12" color tvs, radios, small 10" fans, etc) Buy some 25 watt bulbs and then when the power goes off put them in your regular lamps and they will operate 2-3 hours.
 
Inverters are cheap and ideal for anyone who can not have access to a generator, such as those living in an apartment. To have 3 -4 hours of standby power for under $100 follow these steps:
 
1.  Buy an inverter at Wal-mart. Usually under $40. Get at least 500 watts. Get one that will plug into a cigarette lighter in a car or directly to a 12 volt battery with clamps. The inverters are in  the auto section. You can also buy them at a higher price at truck stops and auto stores.
 
2. Buy a 12 volt car battery at Wal-mart ($35). Ideally get one the same size as your car battery for emergency use. I get the smaller ones because my wife doesn't like the heavy ones. Also get the maritime black box ($4) so that if the battery ever leaks your flooring will not be harmed. The Coast Guard requires boaters to put the batteries in a waterproof black box to avoid spills and Wal-mart has every size.
 
3. Connect the inverter clamps to the car battery. Red clamp to positive, black clamp to negative.
 
4. Thats it. Plug your SMALL appliance into the inverter.
 
The inverter makes no noise. We got each child their own for Xbox video games. They are very nice at night to run a small fan $10- no larger than 10 inches at walmart.
 
You can recharge your battery with an AC charger ($30) or from a generator. Be sure the battery charger has a chrage indicator switch showing the percentage charged and that the cord comes out from the side of the chrager-not underneath the charger. Some battery chargers actually sit on their own cord, this causes the cord to fray and renders the charger useless. Check the battery for water.
 
You can also lend your inverter to friends who do not have a generator.
 
We charge our batteries every 3 months during non use and they have generally degraded to 80% or a loss of 1 hour.
 
Everyone who owns a generator should have a carbon monoxide detector even though the generator should ALWAYS be outside when in use. What people overlook until is they also need a carbon monoxide detector if their neighbors have generators. Shifting winds and changes in elevations can kill you with carbon monoxide. After the thrid hurricane over half our neighborhood used generators, and our detector was constantly going off. We got all the neighbors to turn the generators off at night.
 
Finally, generators are stolen by thieves moving a loud lawnmower next to
the generator at night, then stealing the generator. The constant noise masks the theft, so this is another reason to never run the generator at night.  


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He who walks with the wise grows wise, but a companion of fools suffers harm.Proverbs 13:20, The Bible


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 24 2006 at 4:56pm
I wouldn't know how to fix up a generator and attach it to the mains even if I could afford one.  I have been working out how to manage without it.  Primarily I have to have a means of cooking - you can't eat beans and rice raw.  I'm going to try to find a store that sells firebaskets, and either buy or copy.  I'm going to build a coal/wood burning stove.  Bricks for the surround;firebasket or grids from and old cooker/barbecue to put the coals on and let the air underneath; another grid to put the pot on. 
A pressure cooker to save fuel and cooking time (it won't be much fun cooking in a cold cellar in winter).  Thank goodness I don't actually have to do it outdoors in the wind and rain. 
One of those metal kettles with a squeeker on the spout so it doesn't boil dry and burn. 
And batteries for portable radio. 
And lots of woolly jumpers in case there's no heat in winter.
Love Beth


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 25 2006 at 1:38pm
Beth, you might want to take a look at the Solar Ovens thread. You can make one for less than $10 and save yourself a ton of fuel costs, plus, which is even more important, you are not signalying to the whole neighborhood that you have something to cook!
For indoor: A Coleman camping stove seems to be safest. Also, check out all the great idea's KatDoe67 has about using a stainless steel thermos.
Please, be really careful with open fire, you don't want to burn down your home!


Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 26 2006 at 6:24pm
Our neighbor has a generator but he doesn't stock enough fuel to keep it going for very long. I'm not sure if he's planning on storing more fuel or not.
We are planning on using candles, oil lamps, and Coleman lanterns for light. We also have flashlights and battery operated lanterns.
 
To cook, we are going to use a Coleman dual fuel campstove. We also have a propane grill and we have a firepit in our yard. We could also use our woodstove if it is winter time. Too hot to use for cooking in the summer months.
 
For heat, we'll use the wood stove. We will use blankets or plastic sheeting to seal off rooms that heat is not needed in.
 
Now about staying cool. We live in a mobile home so these things are like tin cans and summer heat is not fun. If we have no electricity, we'll be forced to keep the windows open for air and hope for a breeze. It will mean going around in as few clothes as possible to deal with the heat. I am hoping and praying it isn't so bad that we have to keep all the windows closed up cause I don't think I could survive that.
 
What are your plans for dealing with no electricity? We don't know if it would be a week or months without it. It's a very good idea to have a plan and a backup plan.


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Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: JaxMax
Date Posted: March 27 2006 at 9:33am
Daydreamer-
 
Here in Florida, after the hurricanes heat and humidity was a problem. (Hurricanes only occur during the summer) All we could do was open the windows and run small battery powered fans and take cold showers. We could run a small fan for about 3 hours on a car battery (12 volt) and an inverter before we had to recharge the car battery with the generator.
 
I lent these to several friends who did not have generators and without exception using the small fans was the #1 use of the temp inverter power.
 
If you can attach tarps over your mobile home (tie them to trees or something else) and leave at least 3-4 feet space for airflow between your roof and the tarp, you can reduce your temperature by 10-15 degrees. We did this for friends living in a mobile home and it worked when  there is direct sun exposure. Use the silver not the blue tarps. Tarps of all types avaiable at Lowes, Home Depot, auto parts stores. 


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He who walks with the wise grows wise, but a companion of fools suffers harm.Proverbs 13:20, The Bible


Posted By: zoe17
Date Posted: March 28 2006 at 9:45am
Having a large 6500W and a 2000EU genny is good.Run the big one for a few hours during the day to keep freezers/fridge cold, recharge batteries. At night wheb needed a EU can power the travel trailer A/C or a window unit placed in a bedroom to coll instead of running cental air. Having 200# of propane for genny is good, having a natural gas line to genny is great. Having 150 gallons of gasoline for whatever is also good. My outside shed is full.
 
Running a small quiet genny at night will be a security risk, so it will only be used if it is a neccesity.


Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 28 2006 at 12:58pm
JaxMax, thank you so much for the tarp idea. You really have me thinking now. I know that they sell tarps big enough to cover huge piles of those large round bales of hay so they would have one big enough to do this job.
I'll have to get enough rope to get to the trees. We do have trees within 10 or 15 feet of our mobile home so it would be a stretch but I think we could make that idea work. We might have to have something at the edge of the tarps to help stabilize it. I'll talk to my husband about this. He's more of the engineer mind. I'm sure he can come up with a plan.
Thanks for sharing this idea.


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Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: co_ski_bunny
Date Posted: March 31 2006 at 11:11am
I see a few posts here where people are going to use their Coleman stoves to cook.  I have one of these...one less thing I need to buy Clap  My question is, I have seen other posts where you can't burn propane indoors.  Does anyone know if this is correct?  If so, for everyone who has a Coleman, are you going to use it outside?  Would using by an open window help?


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 31 2006 at 12:03pm
I will be using mine inside...but I have the option of my using my screened in back deck..that is were my bbq is...but if I were to use my coleman indoors I would do so near an opened window....


Posted By: Daydreamer
Date Posted: March 31 2006 at 7:11pm
We will be using ours inside most of the time. We will just open a window to be on the safe side.

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Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: March 31 2006 at 11:17pm

I read a post somewhere on this site suggesting the Cobb cooking system for cooking: http://www.cobbamerica.com/ - http://www.cobbamerica.com/

It only needs 5 to 10 charcoal briquettes and with good ventilation can be used indoors after being lit outdoors. Used outdoors, it wouldn't be as conspicuous to the neighbors as a propane grill would be.

I bought the Cobb from the Canadian site: http://cobbcanada.ca/ - http://cobbcanada.ca/
which also has a very good promotional video demonstrating how to use the Cobb as well as having a separate safety video, both on this page: http://cobbcanada.ca/videos.html - http://cobbcanada.ca/videos.html

I posted on their message board asking about boiling water and received this response:

Quote Boiling water on the Cobb is easy. Just remove the cooking grid and place your pot or billy straight on to the fire basket (the wire grid that contains the briquettes).

I don't have any charcoal yet so I'll have to wait to give that a try.

If I used the Cobb in winter when there was no electricity, I'd probably try using it in my attached garage with the garage door partly raised. I'd want to conserve as much heat as possible inside my house and I can't do that with the windows open for ventilation.
 
By the way, does anyone know what a "billy" is?


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: April 09 2006 at 8:26pm
I am debating wether to use propane or a dual fuel stove for cooking.

Any suggestions?

Thanks! 


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 10 2006 at 7:12am
Originally posted by JaxMax JaxMax wrote:

2. Buy a 12 volt car battery at Wal-mart ($35). Ideally get one the same size as your car battery for emergency use. I get the smaller ones because my wife doesn't like the heavy ones.
 
May I suggest that you buy the marine deep-cycle (D-C) type batteries. They will provide power for longer periods and withstand recharging much longer than an automotive battery. Get the gel cells if you can afford 'em. The money you spend on deep-cycles will save you $$$ in the long term.
 
They are large and heavy. I have a small wheeled tote/wagon that holds two of the D-Cs and two small lawn tractor batteries which makes for easy mobility for recharging.
 
I also live in Florida, central Gulf Coast, and have lost power many times for up to two weeks. Besides 5 gallon gas cans I also have a boat with a 35 gallon tank. Normally I have enough gas for the normal outage. But since the BF could last much longer I'm in search of 15 gallon plastic barrels to extend my gen set time.
 
 


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Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 13 2006 at 8:10am
I am looking for an affordable generator.  Does anybody have any recommendations?  I plan to only use it for a small chest freezer, maybe a few lights, or small appliances (bread maker) etc.  I also want to use it to charge marine deep-cyle batteris.  Do I need to look for anything special for this?  Pep Boys has a sale on a coleman 3125 peak watt, 2500 watt continuous gas powered generator.  One gas tank runs 10 hrs at 50% load.  It only costs $239.00 after a $20 rebate.  Any thoughts? Perhaps I should go more wattage or another brand?  Honda's are extremely expensive.
 
One other thought, do I connect the generator to a 12V battery charger and then connect the battery charger to the battery?  Or do you connect straight from generator to battery terminals?  I've never had a generator before so please bear with my idiot like questions.  Thanks.


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 13 2006 at 8:36am

http://www.avianflutalk.com/member_profile.asp?PF=1209&FID=13 -

 

First of all, add the wattage of all the devices you plan on powering with your gen set. Most generators have a ‘surge’ and ‘run’ wattage rating. Buy a gen set that has a ‘run’ rating at least 20% higher than your total wattage.

 

Depending of your age and physical capability, you might want to consider an electric start. Last year I aggravated an old ball injury in my shoulder starting a gen set. I now have an electric start and the old unit is my back up. Besides if the weather is bad I can have my bride of 37 years start that sucker. Thumbs Up

 

Buy a good electronic battery charger that has a deep cycle capability. Start the gen set, connect the charger to the batt, plug the charger into the gen set and then turn on the charger.

 

That’s a good price on the PEP Boys unit, but remember you get what you pay for. Google around for gen set comparisons and find what meets your needs.

 

Good luck!



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Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 13 2006 at 11:24am
2ifbyC,
 
Thanks for your help!  One other thing, for your Gel batteries, what AH rating do you recommend?  The higher you go, the pricer they get.  I thought you might have a good feel for what size to get (is AH84 good enough or should I go higher?).  Thanks again. 
 


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 13 2006 at 11:54am
prepmeister,
 
I have the D900Ms : http://www.dcbattery.com/optima_blue.html - http://www.dcbattery.com/optima_blue.html  . I purchased mine year before last via the web. I can't remember where! I had to search hard for 'em for at that time there was a shortage. I think the military had pretty much consumed most of 'em.
 
Another nice thing about them is that they store very, very well and they have excellent recovery.
 
Shop around for the best price with shipping. They are heavy!
 
Now in all honesty, you can go with less expensive batts and probably meet your needs. But I didn't want to cut corners when it came to hurricane outages.
 
Again, good luck!


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 11:50am
2ifbyC,
 
What size inverters do you have?  I currently have a 500 Watt continous/1000 Watt surge, and a smaller 200 watt cig. lighter one.  Do you see a need to buy an even larger one?  Based on your experiences from Florida, what size was the most practical connecting up to your GEL battery? 


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 12:14pm
Originally posted by prepmeister prepmeister wrote:

2ifbyC,
 
What size inverters do you have?  I currently have a 500 Watt continous/1000 Watt surge, and a smaller 200 watt cig. lighter one.  Do you see a need to buy an even larger one?  Based on your experiences from Florida, what size was the most practical connecting up to your GEL battery? 
 
I currently have 1000, 400 and 300 watt inverters. The smaller ones are for fans  and small TVs primarily. The 1000 is for large screen TV, computer, tabletop shortwave radio, fan and a some lighting if needed. I haven't found a need for more at this time. So you look 'good to go' if your situation is simular to mine.
 
With the inverters you have, size really isn't an issue with the larger batts. Now I do have a couple of smaller lawn tractor batts for the fans since they are so portable.
 
 
 
 


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 12:38pm
2ifbyC,
 
How long can your 1000 inverter/Gel cell keep your large screen setup running given a full charge?


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 1:53pm
Originally posted by prepmeister prepmeister wrote:

2ifbyC,
 
How long can your 1000 inverter/Gel cell keep your large screen setup running given a full charge?
 

I really don't know in that I recharge my batts at least every other day during an outage. I have at least one TV on at all times.

 

I just ran a test on my 32” LCD TV and the cable box. I used a ‘KILL A WATT’ meter which reads voltage, current, wattage and Hertz (cps). Great little unit that costs under $30. Sure lets ya know what your equipment requirements are.

 

TV = 139W @ 1.4 Amps

CB =   24W @ 0.4 Amps

 

So for my batts I would say at least 40 hours, probably more just for the TV and cable box. There is a little power consumption within the inverters also.

 
 
 
 
http://www.dcacpowerinverters.com/faq.htm - http://www.dcacpowerinverters.com/faq.htm


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 2:02pm
2ifbyC,
 
40 hours is very good.  I'm off to find a D900!  Thanks for checking on this.  It has been very useful.
 
By the way, I found a guy looking to get rid of a generator that he only used once a couple years ago.  He said is is a 5000 watt unit and he only wants $50 for it.  He is moving and can't afford the weight.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 2:29pm
I'm thinking of getting a couple of Deep Cycle batteries for minimal lighting when the generator is off.  I only plan on running it 3-4 hours a day, just long enough to wash clothes, catch up on the news and get some hot water.  Any suggestions for a FAST battery charger to use while the generator is running?


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 2:36pm
Originally posted by co_ski_bunny co_ski_bunny wrote:

I see a few posts here where people are going to use their Coleman stoves to cook.  I have one of these...one less thing I need to buy Clap  My question is, I have seen other posts where you can't burn propane indoors.  Does anyone know if this is correct?  If so, for everyone who has a Coleman, are you going to use it outside?  Would using by an open window help?
 
Ski Bunny,
 
A LOT of manufactured homes are shipped from the factory with propane powered stoves and heaters.  It must not be an unsafe practice or H.U.D. would not certify the homes for Fnma loans.   During the Hurricanes of 2004, we got hit 3 times, and burned the Coleman  indoors with no problems.    Also,  almost 100% of Recreational Vehicles use propane for the range/oven, hot water AND refrigeration.  Must be pretty safe!


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 3:04pm
Originally posted by prepmeister prepmeister wrote:

  He said is is a 5000 watt unit and he only wants $50 for it.  He is moving and can't afford the weight.
 
You jump on that puppy like a bird on a June bug!!!
 
When you get it home, fill with freash gas, start it and let it idle for 10 mins. This warms the engine prior to loading after sitting for so long. Then plug in at least 2000 watts of equipment one at a time and run for 30 mins. Do not start the gen set with equipment plugged in. Do this at least every two or three months.
 
After your first run, change the oil! I use synthetic. Then follow the recommended oil change interval.
 
Let us know how it works!


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 3:13pm
Originally posted by twoolf twoolf wrote:

  Any suggestions for a FAST battery charger to use while the generator is running?
 
Deep cycles (D-C) DO NOT like rapid charges. That will reduce the number of recharges the batt will take in it's lifetime.
 
Unfortunately deep cycles require a stepped and slower charging protocol. Be sure to buy a charger with the deep cycle capability and at least a 10 amp setting!  Mine has a 20/10/5 capability. Your D-C batts will reward you with hundreds of recharges.
 
I have had no issues with just recharging for a few hours to top 'em off.


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 7:43pm
2ifbyC,
 
Thanks for the info, as you recommended, I went out tonight and found a deep cycle Black and Decker charger that even has a mode that you can select if it is a GEL battery or even AGM.  Although it has 15/10/5 amp capability. 


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 14 2006 at 8:13pm
Originally posted by prepmeister prepmeister wrote:

even has a mode that you can select if it is a GEL battery or even AGM.  
 
Nice! I wasn't aware that they have progressed that far. My charger is about 6/7 years old.
 
Have you nabbed that gen set yet?


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 15 2006 at 2:15am
The Guy (good friend) will be moving in about 2-3 weeks.  He said he will bring a truck to my house wiht the generator at that time.  He did say it was in excellent condition.  I can't wait.  For now I am trying to get everything else in place.


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 15 2006 at 3:12am
I found what looks to be a fairly fast small battery charger that accomadates C's an D's NiMH batteries in about 2-5 hours that would probably be good if you need these type of batteries.  Most NiMH 15 minute chargers are only for AA/AAA batteries.  Could possibly hookup to an inverter if needed.  It is a bit pricey though.  This might be good for those rainy days that solar battery chargers fail you.
 
http://thomas-distributing.com/maha-mh-c808m-battery-charger.htm - http://thomas-distributing.com/maha-mh-c808m-battery-charger.htm


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 15 2006 at 8:48am

We have been discussing the merits, uses and selection of generators, inverters, chargers and batteries. Now I would like to introduce the subject of DC power adapters. This allows you to run some devices without using an inverter.

 

First, many of our smaller devices are powered by an AC (Alternating Current) adapter that plugs into the wall outlet and provides DC (Direct Current) voltage, normally 3-12 VDC. Any device with a DC power jack can be powered by a battery and Universal DC Adapter, saving your AA/AAA/etc. batteries for when you are out and about.

 

What you need:

 

12 VDC battery

Universal DC adapter – i.e.  http://www.laptoptravel.com/Product.aspx?ID=2019 . This adapter comes with a set of the most common connection adapters and is 3-12 VDC selectable.

 

Power Adapter with Battery Clips - http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10001&&storeId=10001&langId=-1&productId=189015&ref=81902 - .

 

Determine the proper voltage by looking at the device data label or the AC adapter. Select the proper voltage on the universal DC adapter. Determine which plug adapter to use for your device. Clip the female adapter battery clips to the 12 VDC battery observing proper polarity. Plug the male DC adapter into the female adapter. Now you’re good to go.

 

It’s easier to do than to describe. Maybe this will help:

 

Battery <<clips > female DC adapter << selectable DC adapter >> connector adapter >> device

 

Feel free to ask any questions if I have confused you!



-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: prepmeister
Date Posted: April 15 2006 at 12:09pm
2ifbyC,
 
You must have electricity in your blood.  You are awesome!  What a great idea.  I'll be buying these items as well.  It really gives you more flexibility to have this setup as well for portable electronics.  Thanks for teaching me this.  Who knows, your knowledge could end up making a big difference for my family.  I really appeciate it.


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 15 2006 at 3:22pm
Aw shucks... Just trying to ante up on all the great info I've retrieved from the rest of ya'll.
 
I am a gadget guy. During our 'canes down here I have a TV, shortwave radio, police scanner and computer going just 'bout 24/7. Y2K was my first attempt at 'being prepared'. I still have and use items that come in very handy when the lights go out.
 
I do have an electronic background but that just allowed me to buy my gadgets! Wink
 
Somewhere on this site I've stated that I'm a lazy 13 year old trapped in a 59 year old bod. So I'm always looking for a way to 'do it better, do it cheaper'.
 
Have fun!
 
ETA  On those DC adapters, just remember that you will need one for each of your electronics. You can buy these to expand you capability: http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062269&cp=2032056.2032136.2032154&pg=2&parentPage=family


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: April 19 2006 at 4:16am

Thanks to all for the power inverter idea.  I bought a 700?  and a deep cycle marine battery yesterday.  Haven't tried it out yet.

Can you tell me how many hours of power we can expect from the battery?  Really just planning to cook on a single burner appliance and maybe a bit of tv - small one just 9".  And, is there a way to recharge the battery without electrical power?
 
Thanks!
 
s


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: April 19 2006 at 8:24am
sand,
 
Not knowing your battery reserve capacity in Amp Hours, I can't give you a definitive answer. But here is the simplfied Cliff notes version:
 

(xAmps + yAmps + zAmps) x time in hours = Amp Hours

 

(2A+3A+4A) x 5 hrs = AH

 

9A x 5 = 45AH

 

450 AH reserve capacity battery / 45AH = 10 hours

 
Keep in mind that the inverter itself comsumes power. So the total will be a little less than the 10 hours above.
 
You must determine how much power your single burner appliance requires. Chances are that the appliance will require much more wattage than your inverter can supply. Plus any inverter is a POOR device for any type of heating application. I would highly recommend using a fuel type stove.
 
As for the TV, if it is rated for a typical 100-150 watts with the above 450 AH battery you would be good for 15-20 hours. Your smaller TV would probably run longer.
 
HINT: LCD TVs require much less power than one with a picture tube (CRT) of the same size. Wink
 
The only way to recharge a battery without electrical service would be a $olar panel $y$tem (notice the $$$). Confused That's why I have a generator!
 
Here is a terrific site for those with inverter questions: http://www.donrowe.com/inverters/inverter_faq.html#how_long - http://www.donrowe.com/inverters/inverter_faq.html#how_long  . There are wattage charts, formulas, etc. Clap
 
Let me know if you have any other questions. Take care and have fun!
 
 


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: April 19 2006 at 9:04am
Using one deep cycle battery on a range top will kill it in a matter of minutes.
I had two deep cycle golf cart batteries hooked together, hooked up my inverter (3000 watt), plugged in my vaccume cleaner..... it lasted for about 15 minutes. And a range top uses a lot more power.
AS 2yfbic said, unless your rich, don't waste money on solar panels. Buy a small generator and stock up on gas.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: April 22 2006 at 11:16am
Breadbox oven:
 
Quote If you have an old metal breadbox, you can use it as an oven, much the same as a Coleman oven that sets upon a stove, drill a hole in the top and insert an oven thermometer to keep track of the heat, and open the door a little or a lot to regulate the heat. You can use this breadbox a couple of ways, one is to place your food on the top rack and place coals in a pan on the bottom, or you can set the entire box on a grill over a bed of coals.
 
From here: http://www.alpharubicon.com/altenergy/altcookingpooch.htm - http://www.alpharubicon.com/altenergy/altcookingpooch.htm
 


Posted By: dundeels01
Date Posted: April 27 2006 at 8:42am
Sorry for the length of this post, but I found this situation to be very educational to myself and my parents.  So my folks had a small wake up call last night as to why I encouraged them to get a backup generator for their house.  They got a very nice 7KW Honda and got it wired into the house(by an electrician) via a Gen Tran transfer switch.  We also  had a custom made 50' 10/4 cable made so they can keep it clear of the house for carbon monoxide concerns.  They live in a hurricane zone, so this large expense was justifiable.  Funny thing is that Dad had me "pickle" the engine at the end of last year's hurricane season so that he wouldn't have to start it every month as reccomended.  When I pickled it, I "fogged" the engine with Bombardier Storage Oil, stabilized the fuel, drained the carb, placed the battery on a tender, and all that other good stuff so that my father would not have to deal with the generator on a regular basis.
 
Last night the power went out for about 10 hours and it was time for him to fire it up.  Unfortunately, because I mummified this generator and my father didn't have to use it on a regular basis, he was not comfortable using it at all.  So this whole system went unused when they could have really benefited from their purchase.  It had basically become just another tool in the garage that sits in the corner.  They have 15- 5 gallon gas cans that were all empty.  Soooo, the bottom line here was that they were "ready" but they were not really ready at all. 
 
Fortunately for my parents, I had left my smaller EU2000is Honda at their house and they were comforatble using that for the computer, satellite tv, and a couple of lights.  They just ran the extension cords into the house and plugged directly into the generator.  This worked fine, and luckily, I had it fully gassed up(1 gallon tank runs 15 hrs!).  After talking them through the process on the cell phone, they were back in business.  This finally made them realize the importance of having fuel and being very comfortable and knowledgable about running a generator. 
 
The next time that I get down there, in the very near future, I'm going to go through Generator 101 with them again.  It really is something that most people should review on a somewhat regular basis, it probably would not hurt to actually perform a test run either if you have never done so in the past.  Many people take for granted that they will be able to run these things, but when it comes down to it, it is often not that easy or as safe as one would think.  That's why you always hear of the carbon monoxide deaths of home owners and electrocutions of utility workers when these things are not used properly.  The only advice that I can give from my parents experience last night, is it is extremely important to be familiar with your equipment and know how to use it  because you never know when you just might actually need it.
 


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 04 2006 at 1:19pm
You can buy regular sized light bulbs in 12 volt.  By using a lamp or two and rewiring to a car battery, which is easily rechargable, you can light the place for lots of hours. Buy real cheap 16 or 18 gauge extension cords and strip the ends down to use.

I'm buying an large tractor battery with more reserve amps to use. Be careful to set it outside as acid gas is not good to breathe and never bring inside to recharge.

Be careful that windows are properly covered when lighting at night so prying eyes can't see you have lights.


Posted By: 40acrediesel
Date Posted: May 04 2006 at 1:37pm
Please be sure to fuse or use a 12VDC rated circuit breaker on any of these hotwiring projects.  Short-circuiting an automotive battery can have explosive results.


Posted By: 40acrediesel
Date Posted: May 04 2006 at 1:42pm
Also, be sure to calculated required amps.  Low voltage bulbs require high current to make wattage( V = I x R and P = I squared R).  A 25 watt bulb would take about 2 amps of current.  A string of 5 bulbs would require 10 amps.  18 gauge wire is only good for about 5 - 7 amps, 16 gauge is only good for 10 amps.  14 gauge is good for 15 amps, 12 gauge for 20.  Be sure the fuse/breaker is coodinated with the wire, else you will make the wire into your fuse & have a meltdown/fire.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 04 2006 at 1:55pm
Thanks for clarification 40. In my head I was only figuring on a couple bulbs.  You will find standed wire will carry a little more that single wire though.

I also forgot to clarify to make sure battery connections are tight. Don't just wind the wire around the terminal. Marine  terminal adapters should be crimped securely on the wire.


Posted By: maryk
Date Posted: May 04 2006 at 10:34pm

For heat this winter My family has made one of these

6 http://www.shopzilla.com/rd?http://clickserve.cc-dt.com/link/ddiprod?lid=41000000000657153&pid=16160!!b_id=17&bamt=8e6fc9110ff780c3&cat_id=13110108&mid=31891&oid=414916370&pos=0&ppr=bc82c748d24beeb8&prod_id=414916370&token_id=7S">Vogelzang Barrel Stove Kit, Model# BK100E http://www.shopzilla.com/rd?http://clickserve.cc-dt.com/link/ddiprod?lid=41000000000657153&pid=16160!!b_id=17&bamt=8e6fc9110ff780c3&cat_id=13110108&mid=31891&oid=414916370&pos=0&ppr=bc82c748d24beeb8&prod_id=414916370&token_id=7S - Vogelzang Barrel Stove Kit, Model# BK100E

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http://www.shopzilla.com/rd?http://clickserve.cc-dt.com/link/ddiprod?lid=41000000000657153&pid=16160!!b_id=17&bamt=8e6fc9110ff780c3&cat_id=13110108&mid=31891&oid=414916370&pos=0&ppr=bc82c748d24beeb8&prod_id=414916370&token_id=7S - See more product information at NorthernTool.com http://www.shopzilla.com/6B_-_mid--31891">Overall Rating: 8.5
http://www.shopzilla.com/9Y--Heaters_-_cat_id--13110108__shoplist_pid--414916370 - + Add to Shopzilla List
 
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http://www.shopzilla.com/rd?http://clickserve.cc-dt.com/link/ddiprod?lid=41000000000657153&pid=16160!!b_id=17&bamt=8e6fc9110ff780c3&cat_id=13110108&mid=31891&oid=414916370&pos=0&ppr=bc82c748d24beeb8&prod_id=414916370&token_id=7S">Compare Prices http://www.shopzilla.com/rd?http://clickserve.cc-dt.com/link/ddiprod?lid=41000000000657153&pid=16160!!b_id=17&bamt=8e6fc9110ff780c3&cat_id=13110108&mid=31891&oid=414916370&pos=0&ppr=bc82c748d24beeb8&prod_id=414916370&token_id=7S - Found at 1 stor


Posted By: MAJDAD
Date Posted: May 08 2006 at 9:04am
2ifbyC:
 
You seem to be the brightest one here on this subject.  I want to set up solar panels to keep 2 or 3 12 volt batteries charged.  I want to run a small (9" AC/DC) TV and a CB Radio on it.  What size panel would you recommend and what site.  What hoops do I need to jump though to make it happen.
 
I also want to set up to recharge D cells, 123 cell (photo batteries) and AA batteries all on solar  ( 36 D Cells 6 123 3 Volt and 30 AA batteries)  again what size panel would you recommend and how would I set that up.
 
Thank you for all your help


-------------
Major Dad hopes you are all alive and well and looking out for each other


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: May 08 2006 at 1:30pm
MAJDAD,
 
Sorry, when it comes to solar power my 'wattage' dims. The co$t has prevented me from jumping in with both feet. I did read that the minimum panel wattage for MAINTAINING (read trickle charge) a 12VDC battery charge is 15 watts.
 
A 15 watter should do fine for the smaller batts with the appropriate charger/controller(s).
 
As to the TV and CB, get a proper voltage AC/DC adapter(s) or add up the wattage and use an inverter. Both would be powered by a 12 VDC batt. That way you're not at the mercy of the sun as with a direct-power solar panel. Note that you will use more wattage when you transmit on the CB. 'Receive only' comsumes very little power.
 
My best recommendation is to Google solar panels and if you have any questions afterwards please feel free to contact me. There is a ton of info out there.
 
Good luck!
 
 
 
 


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: gilmor
Date Posted: May 08 2006 at 9:48pm

Recently read / heard that U.S. oil refineries CANNOT operate with 30% of employees off. . . These plants produce our gasoline, but also the fuels that run alot of our power plants.

Almost 20% of U.S. electricity is produced by nuclear power. Deregulation has forced all power companies to run “lean and mean”. I would think that like an oil refinery, a nuclear power plant could not operate with 30% of it’s work force off.

Both nuke fueled power plants and refineries are NOT “light switch operations”. . . Both MUST be slowly shut down and slowly restarted. . . Coal, natural gas and oil powered electrical generating plants are known as “peaker’s” within the industry and are especially used to quickly reach maximum output on hot (A/C usage) days. . .

just some thoughts,

Gilmore



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 13 2006 at 12:18pm
Originally posted by dundeels01 dundeels01 wrote:

 They have 15- 5 gallon gas cans that were all empty.  When you open the fourth can, must refill the other three, that's what I do if my husband doesn't. We keep two out of normal usage which helps me know when he's on the fourth can.
 
The next time that I get down there, in the very near future, I'm going to go through Generator 101 with them again.  I wrote down EVERY STEP, from moving the generator into place to throwing the switch to disconnect from the city line to checking the oil, fuel, and hookups. To exactly how to start, load, and shut down. WRITE IT DOWN, put in a plastic document cover, attach to the generator. 
 
It really is something that most people should review on a somewhat regular basis, it probably would not hurt to actually perform a test run either if you have never done so in the past.  Our storm two weeks ago took our power (only a few hours, but we did not know what happened). For us, we have a water-well, no power, no water. Husband had me do all the steps following my notes from the December outages.
 
Many people take for granted that they will be able to run these things, but when it comes down to it, it is often not that easy or as safe as one would think. Found out that I did not know how to reset the Safety Pressure Switch in the pump house. More notes now attached inside the pump house and we bought a spare safety switch.
 
That's why you always hear of the carbon monoxide deaths of home owners and electrocutions of utility workers when these things are not used properly.
Sounds like you made sure the Utility Workers were protected. Carbon Monoxide detectors are important in the home. JaxMax made an interesting point, his detector went off from so many neighbors using their generators at night, they all agreed not to run generators while sleeping. Had not thought of that.
 
The only advice that I can give from my parents experience last night, is it is extremely important to be familiar with your equipment and know how to use it  because you never know when you just might actually need it. Good advice, thank you. 


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 17 2006 at 6:28pm
Generator gas consumption:
approx. 1 gallon for 8 hours at 1 KW load (Honda EU-2000i)
So, 8 KWH/gal.

Operating for 2 hours/day for 4 days would use about 1 gallon of gas. That's about 15 gallons/month. It's a LOT of gas to be storing!


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 17 2006 at 6:34pm
Solar power:

Cost of panels is about $3/Watt.
Panels need to be steered to track the sun for maximum output.
Above 40 degrees North, panels are less useful. Larger panel area needed.
A regulator is needed for charging batteries. Some batteries, particularly gel cells, are sensitive to the charging regime.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 17 2006 at 6:48pm
Generator safety issues:

(1) Do not add gasoline to hot generator. Let it cool down completely, until you can touch the exhaust pipe.

(2) Generator should be properly grounded. Use good 3-wire cables of adequatge capacity; no daisy chains.

(3) Exhaust fumes must not enter your living space - carbon monoxide is produced and is VERY toxic.

(4) Arrange generator so no contact with hot exhaust manifold is possible.

(5) Store gasoline away from generator.   


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 17 2006 at 7:23pm
The better way is to have a propane fired generator.  We have a 15 KW  standby hooked to a 500 gallon propane tank. That will give us  about 300 hrs of use.  The well ,in another building circuit is wired to a smaller gen and we have 100 gallons of stabilized gas for it.

If your serious about all this get prepared.  It will take at least 6 hrs a day to keep the frig cold and the house cool.  If this area is out of juice for that long--50 days-- we figure we can "borrow" other neighborhood propane tanks  as everyone else will be moved out.

Remember to only run the gen in the daytime as sound carries further at nite.  If you do run at nite be sure to have window covers as you do not want to advertize you have power.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 18 2006 at 12:23pm
a billy is an Aussie word meaning a pot to boil water for a cuppa, usually made from alaminium and the handle is a peice of wire strung over the top from one side to the other. Can be as small as the tin can you have eaten the beans out of. Just punch two holes in opposite sides near the top of the can, and strin some wire through the holes. Use a stick to lift off the flame or the steam will burn your hand.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 18 2006 at 2:25pm
Additional generator safety note:    

Do not connect generator to your house wiring unless you have a transfer switch installed and approved by a registered electrician, so you do not send out power on the incoming line. A transfer switch isolates your house circuit from that of the power company.


Posted By: Eagles Dancing
Date Posted: May 18 2006 at 5:14pm

We plan to revamp the old spring house to keep items cool this summer.

This is a small building with a cement floor which has a trough that the cold spring water stream pours into.
 
If if was good enough for our fore fathers its good enough for me. 
 
I can't wait to chill some homemade elderberry wine and kick back and enjoy the pleasures that come from living in the sticks.


Posted By: Eagles Dancing
Date Posted: May 18 2006 at 5:28pm
 We purchased a wood furnace that heats the house, barn, greenhouse and supplies us with hot water.
 
Even with the mild winter we went through 45 + ricks of wood!!
 
We sure didn't see that coming.  We had 30 rick cut up and thought that would be plenty. 
 
So we need to start building that old wood pile up again and this time add 20 ricks to our pile on top of the huge one we had last year.
 
That new chainsaw we bought will really get a work out this year.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 18 2006 at 6:10pm
How much wood is a rick? I have never heard that term is it equivlant to a cord?


Posted By: Eagles Dancing
Date Posted: May 18 2006 at 6:22pm
A rick is four feet high 16" to 24" wide and eight feet long stack of wood.  We sell wood around here in "rick".  A rick runs about $35 to $40.
 
Some folks use the term instead of a cord of wood.
 
That's a clear as mud.
 
You have to remember I am from the sticks in Southern Indiana.
 
Sorry for the confusion.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 18 2006 at 10:13pm
Here's a interesting tip for those who have water on their property:
 
Quote A lake, pond, or stream can be a good source of refrigeration. You can fill a metal picnic cooler with food and put the cooler in the water, making sure that either the cooler has a watertight seal so the foods keep dry inside or keep the top of the cooler above the water level. Unopened canned drinks can be kept icy cold submersed in a running stream.
 
From here: http://www.lacetoleather.com/refrigeration.html - http://www.lacetoleather.com/refrigeration.html
 


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 25 2006 at 10:31am
Help needed!! Would you electrical whizz-kids PLEASE take a look at question for Ice under priority preps?? Pretty PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 25 2006 at 10:32am
I'm a first-class moron, it's under survival tips


Posted By: AVanarts
Date Posted: May 25 2006 at 10:52am
Originally posted by Eagles Dancing Eagles Dancing wrote:

A rick is four feet high 16" to 24" wide and eight feet long stack of wood.  We sell wood around here in "rick".  A rick runs about $35 to $40.
 
Some folks use the term instead of a cord of wood.
 
That's a clear as mud.
 
You have to remember I am from the sticks in Southern Indiana.
 
Sorry for the confusion.
 
A Cord of wood is defined as 128 cubic feet, or 4ft x 4ft x 8ft.  I don't know if a "rick" is formally defined, but a Cord sure is.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 27 2006 at 11:37am
I have a 600W pure sine wave inverter and a 110Ah deep cycle battery and a decent ctek battery charger for charging when the power is back on.
 
Now my questions.  I am thinking of running my cars engine to power the inverter if the electric is off for a while (my tank never gets more than half empty).
Anyone know how many amps a car alternator gives? How much fuel do cars (1.6 and 2 Litre engines) use when iding?


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 27 2006 at 12:06pm
Differant cars have differant alternators. Check you manual as it should tell you.  Idle cas use. Anybodys guess. Ask a dealer maybe. Cars can overheat if idled too long so watch the temp gauge closely.

I think you better try the inverter first with a full battery.  It won't  last long.   The inverter draws a lot of juice.

  A better way to power light bulbs is the 12v battery itself.  Get some RV bulbs-they come 50W.  Buy some old  lamps at a garage sale, cut the  plugs off and strip them down to attach to a battery. 


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 28 2006 at 12:27am
Originally posted by libbyalex libbyalex wrote:

Simple, I know. When it gets dark outside, go to bed. When dawn breaks, wake up! Adapt schedule to the rising and setting of the sun. -- Libby


I spent 9 days at an ecoresort in Costa Rica a few years ago.  It's very easy to adjust to the "up at dawn, down at sunset" schedule whenthere are no computers and TVs to keep you awake.




Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 28 2006 at 2:25am
I can't run the central heating without electric (draws 125Watts at most) and we have a lot of food in freezers.  Also our gas fire has a fan that requires 35 Watts.  So the inverter is for an hours heating and 2 hours freezer running per day.  I am assuming that the gas is less likely to go off and if it does we just wrap up.
I am hoping that here in the UK the power outages will be less than a day at a time and that I can charge my batteries in between.  I forsee many short power outages rather than any prolonger one (beacuse the country would be totally stuffed otherwise)


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: May 28 2006 at 7:34am
Web Ferret,
 
Have you checked the wattage of your freezer? Most power charts put them at 600-1000 watts. The start-up surge will be closer to the top end.


-------------
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 28 2006 at 10:27am
If your outages are less than a day at a time why worry? If its cold  the freezer will last for days. Just buy a couple extra blankets.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 28 2006 at 11:33am
The freezer runs at 80 watts - the start-up surge is 1000W.  Its a very efficient and well insulated Bosch. I have a power meter that measures this stuff - I know its accurate as I have tested it with 60W and 100W light bulbs. 
I have no idea what BF outages may be - I'm just guessing and preparing as best I can like every one else on here.


Posted By: 2ifbyC
Date Posted: May 28 2006 at 1:10pm
Originally posted by Web Ferret Web Ferret wrote:

the start-up surge is 1000W. 
 
Hopefully the freezer won't spike your 600 watt inverter on start up. If the spike period is short enough you might be OK. Have you tested the freezer/inverter combo out yet?
 
 
 
.


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Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 28 2006 at 1:27pm
Just for kicks, I hooked up two 115 ah (6 volt) golf cart batteries in series, with an inverter. Plugged in a vacuume cleaner running 6 amps (about 660 watts), it lasted 15 minutes before the inverter sounded letting me know the batteries were at half charge.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: June 24 2006 at 11:21am

How to build an Iceless Refrigerator (page 1) or a Burlap or Evaporation Cooler (page 2):

http://geocities.com/olstk/refrigerator.pdf - http://geocities.com/olstk/refrigerator.pdf



Posted By: Bill 100
Date Posted: June 25 2006 at 11:49am


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A storm is coming !


Posted By: Irene
Date Posted: July 26 2006 at 2:26pm
Instructions for building your own generator:
 
http://www.permapak.net/homemadepower.htm - http://www.permapak.net/homemadepower.htm
 
 


Posted By: fab4
Date Posted: April 27 2008 at 5:04pm
Old topic but new question - I am looking for a system to power an air purifier and/or CPAP machine - not long term, only for sick room.    Those are the only two things I haven't been able to cover by other means.  Looking into solar for that but it's too costly right now.
 
Another idea I had is this - we have a propane tank outside - don't they make propane generators?  How do you get the propane to the generator.   I know there are relatively inexpensive standby systems out there but require installation which is costly.  Any thoughts?


Posted By: quietprepr
Date Posted: April 28 2008 at 12:18pm
Originally posted by fab4 fab4 wrote:

Old topic but new question - I am looking for a system to power an air purifier and/or CPAP machine - not long term, only for sick room.    Those are the only two things I haven't been able to cover by other means.  Looking into solar for that but it's too costly right now.
 
Another idea I had is this - we have a propane tank outside - don't they make propane generators?  How do you get the propane to the generator.   I know there are relatively inexpensive standby systems out there but require installation which is costly.  Any thoughts?
 
There are many different generators that run on propane. Also, there are companies that make kits to convert gasoline generators to propane. You could use a small generator to charge a few 12 volt batteries and use an inverter to operate the purifier/CPAP machine. That way the generator would not have to run continuously, making your fuel last longer.


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"Learning is not compulsory... neither is survival." - W. Edwards Deming


Posted By: fab4
Date Posted: April 28 2008 at 3:49pm
My propane tank is 300 gallons  sitting in my yard.   Can you hook that kind of tank to a generator?   Or can you fill smaller propane tanks with a big propane tank?  I can just see us creating some big explosion Ouch


Posted By: quietprepr
Date Posted: April 29 2008 at 11:11am
You can do either as long as you have the right equipment. I would consult a professional if you are unsure of the process...that helps avoid the explosions!

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"Learning is not compulsory... neither is survival." - W. Edwards Deming


Posted By: FluMom
Date Posted: April 29 2008 at 8:44pm
Question: if I put in a natural gas generator and the BF hits will natural gas keep coming through the pipes?

I figure that natural gas is a good way to run a generator because all the government emergency compounds are run on natural gas.

Anyone out there know if natural gas will keep coming or will it get shut off like water?

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Always Be Prepared


Posted By: RICHARD-FL
Date Posted: May 22 2008 at 4:48pm
Just like all other utilities if Humans are involved in any way it will likely be closed down due to lack of raw material, shipping, supervisors, and workers.  Once this pandemic hits your area, you will notice the stoppage of sewage, water,  gas, and electrical power.
 
Remember we expect a minimum of 30% sick out rate.  That means they have to operate at a 30% + loss rate or every 3rd person at work missing.


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"...No man is an island on to himself..." Words to remember

RICHARD-FL


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: May 22 2008 at 10:16pm
Originally posted by FluMom FluMom wrote:

Question: if I put in a natural gas generator and the BF hits will natural gas keep coming through the pipes? I figure that natural gas is a good way to run a generator because all the government emergency compounds are run on natural gas.
Anyone out there know if natural gas will keep coming or will it get shut off like water?
FluMom, Richard-FL is correct. Pipeline flow is regulated. Sure alot is computerized but man still controls the operations. We are putting in a propane tank. I have just learned that the natural jets on my gas stove will need to be swapped out (very cheap to do) with a smaller jet opening for the propane bottle. I want to also have a backup when natural gas stops. We are still in the process of building, I want the propane jets in so I KNOW it's up and operational. Not sure what is done for the oven or griddle deck.


Posted By: Lone Wolf
Date Posted: March 11 2009 at 9:53pm
fab4 - Tri-Fuel Carburetor, Gasoline, Natural gas, Propane.
 
http://www.propane-generators.com/a-c_kits.htm#1919%20kit%20prices - http://www.propane-generators.com/a-c_kits.htm#1919%20kit%20prices
 
Hope it helped,  Lone Wolf.


Posted By: jacksdad
Date Posted: March 30 2009 at 2:42pm
Oldish thread but FluMom raised a good point concerning natural gas. It's anybody's guess which utility would go off first, but I read somewhere that natural gas would present a major problem when it came to turning it back on again. Any pilot lights left on when the gas ran out would represent an explosion hazard when it was restored, so the companies would be forced to go door to door and ensure every pilot light was shut off before they could begin pumping to any neighborhoods fed by a common main pipe. That in itself could represent a huge delay, and it would conceivably happen every time the flow of gas was interrupted. Just a thought.

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"Buy it cheap. Stack it deep"
"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.


Posted By: StarBright
Date Posted: June 21 2010 at 10:22pm
Just remember that the life of the generator in a coleman stove will be shortened if you use unleaded fuel. It says so in the instructions near the end.  If you have to use unleaded fuel anyway in an emergency, just remember it has toxic additives.  Cover the pot and avoid breathing any fumes.




Posted By: Penham
Date Posted: June 22 2010 at 9:55pm
Originally posted by jacksdad jacksdad wrote:

Oldish thread but FluMom raised a good point concerning natural gas. It's anybody's guess which utility would go off first, but I read somewhere that natural gas would present a major problem when it came to turning it back on again. Any pilot lights left on when the gas ran out would represent an explosion hazard when it was restored, so the companies would be forced to go door to door and ensure every pilot light was shut off before they could begin pumping to any neighborhoods fed by a common main pipe. That in itself could represent a huge delay, and it would conceivably happen every time the flow of gas was interrupted. Just a thought.
 
Most natural gas appliances have automatic cutoff systems in place when ever the gas goes out or the appliance stops working for some reason, the gas automatically stops flowing to the appliance. We have central heat and air, but the heat part runs off natural gas, if something goes wrong with the heating system the pilot light automatically shuts itself off, the gas stops flowing when it cuts itself off.  Our hot water heater is the same way, when our hot water heater went bad and had to be replaced, the pilot automatically cut itself off.  The gas wall heater we bought for backup heat is also the same way, anything wrong with the heater the gas automatically cuts itself off, they have some type of sensors in them nowadays. The gas doesn't just free flow to pilot lights, you have to actually turn knobs to turn the gas flow on to light the pilots.  Now maybe if you had a REALLY old appliance it would keep flowing, like our bathroom wall heater does not cutoff automatically (house built in 1930) but we only use that in an emergency and I actually remove the handle and keep it in a drawer so it can't be turned on unless it is an emergency.



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