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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Now tracking the Aussie Flu.

SECONDARY PNEUMONIA FROM SEVERE FLU

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LizG View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LizG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 10 2006 at 10:28pm
Hi I got mine 2 weeks ago. Didn't cost anything up here in Canada. I was happy, my daughter will get hers later this week.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 10 2006 at 10:39pm

Good job liz....   That's the cheapest price in Canada yet LOL.

Glad to hear your daughter's will be done this week.  This disease seems to be particularly hard on the young because of the pneumonia.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2006 at 5:53am
Originally posted by Appalled Appalled wrote:

Originally posted by KillerFlu.net KillerFlu.net wrote:

I go to get my shot in the next couple of days! I do want to clarify that there is bacteria and viral Pneumonia.

 

Killer,

Is there a vaccine for Viral Pneumonia?

The simple answer is no, however, the bacterial pneumonia vaccine may protect against viral cases (http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2004-07-11-vaccine_x.htm ) This shot most likely will help. Remember this flu's side effects are reported in this order of complication:

        

 

Primary viral pneumonia (this is the most deadly complication of the Avian Flu) – According to a Medical Briefing on January 4 2006

         Secondary bacterial pneumonia (this is what the vaccination is for, however it can help against the viral also)

         Bacterial sinusitis

         Myositis

         Myocarditis / pericarditis

         Guillian-Barre syndrome

         Reye’s Syndrome

Children under 2 can not get the Pneumococcal vaccination due to their bodies do not react to it. You may also have to get your older children’s shots scheduled at the community health agency, due to their age. Some states will not permit the doctors to write a script or vaccinate in their offices anymore. Young children get RSV easily, so keep them away from the sick. The pneumonia vaccine is generally given once, although revaccination after 3-5 years should be considered for children with nephrotic syndrome, asplenia, or sickle cell anemia who would be less than 11 years old at revaccination. Revaccination should also be considered for high-risk adults who received their first shot six years ago or more, and for those who are shown to have rapid decline in pneumococcal antibody levels.

Notes: The major types of pneumonia are bacterial pneumonia, viral pneumonia, and mycoplasma pneumonia.

Best tips for both viral and bacterial pneumonia:

  • Drink warm fluids to relieve coughing.
  • Use an ultrasonic humidifier in your bedroom to add moisture to the air. (Ultrasonic humidifiers kill bacteria and molds in the water.)
  • Rest.
  • Don't rush your recovery. It can takes weeks to get your full strength back.
  • Don't smoke.
  • Treatment: Early treatment with antibiotics can cure bacterial pneumonia and speed recovery from mycoplasma pneumonia. There are generally no effective treatments for most types of viral pneumonia, which usually heal on their own.

I hope that this helps?!

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halogen601 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote halogen601 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2006 at 3:45pm

I had my pneumonia vaccination back in 1999 and thought they were good for a lifetime.  Just out of curiosity, in 1999, was this the 23 type protective vaccine that Albert is referring to?  I called my doctor and the nurse said that usually only high risk people get the shot.  I reminded her that I was 44 years old and not high risk but she told me to come on in anyway on Saturday for another shot since they had plenty of vaccine.  She commented that another pneumonia shot would not be harmful.  I wonder if Blue Cross Empire Blue covers the cost?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2006 at 6:19pm
I would definitely get it done again if its been around 5 years.... better safe than sorry.    Please post on this thread again after you get it done to let us know.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Corn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2006 at 9:14pm

i have an appointment for tomorow after lunc 45$ did i hear someone say in another thread that the menegitis  vac may also be helpful? it's 110$

may get both since i have a large brain. Super Flu Man must protect himslf from all threats to the planet

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2006 at 9:37pm

You must have heard my mental call...I was gonna post "Where's Bird Flu Man, we NEED him"

Re: Meningitis vax...I paid for my son to have his $160.00 @ our doctor.  He will be the one out and about and so I thought it would be just one more layer of protection.

Meningits is a common complication of viral infection.  That's my understanding anyway.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/meningococcal_g.h tm

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2006 at 9:43pm
 
 
 
Meningitis

Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. The inflammation is usually caused by bacteria or viruses (viral meningitis is also called aseptic meningitis). Less common causes include fungi, protozoa, and other parasites. Sometimes certain medications, cancers, or other diseases can inflame the meninges, although such noninfectious cases of meningitis are much rarer.

Many of the bacteria or viruses that can cause meningitis are fairly common and are more often associated with other everyday illnesses. Sometimes, however, they spread to the meninges from an infection in another part of the body. The infection can start anywhere, including in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, or urinary system, but the most common source is the respiratory tract. From there the microorganisms can enter the bloodstream, travel through the body, and enter the central nervous system. In some cases of bacterial meningitis, the bacteria spread directly to the meninges from a severe nearby infection, such as a serious ear infection (otitis media) or nasal sinus infection (sinusitis). Bacteria may also enter the central nervous system after severe head trauma or head surgery.

Bacterial meningitis is less common than viral meningitis but is usually much more serious and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. Many different types of bacteria can cause meningitis: Group B Streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes are the most common causes of meningitis in newborns. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) are more frequent in children older than 2 months of age. Before the 1990s, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was the leading cause of meningitis in children in the United States. But the widespread use of the Hib vaccine as a routine childhood immunization has dramatically decreased the frequency of meningitis caused by Hib.

Viral meningitis is relatively common and far less serious than bacterial meningitis. It often remains undiagnosed because its symptoms are similar to those of the common flu. The frequency of viral meningitis increases slightly in the summer and fall months because people are more often exposed to common viral agents during those seasons. Most cases of viral meningitis are associated with enteroviruses - viruses that typically cause stomach "flu." However, many other types of viruses, such as the herpes virus, can also cause meningitis. The mumps virus was once a common cause of viral meningitis, but it is now rare due to the routine use of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Bacterial meningitis occurs in people of all ages but is more common in the very young (infants and young children) and the elderly (people above age 60). Teenagers and college students are also slightly more at risk for the disease because of time spent in close contact with many of their peers. Viral meningitis occurs in people of all ages, although it is more common in children.

People with less competent immune systems, such as the very young or those whose immune systems have been compromised by disease, are more at risk for all types of meningitis. Some types are more common in child-care centers, boarding schools, dormitories, and military bases, mainly because infectious diseases tend to spread quickly among large groups of people. Not receiving routine vaccines for certain infectious agents that can cause meningitis - including those for mumps, Hib, and pneumococcus - also increases a person's risk for the disease.

The long-term outlook for children who develop meningitis varies greatly and depends on a child's age, the microorganism causing the infection, any other complications, and the treatment the child receives. The complications of bacterial meningitis can be severe and include neurological problems such as hearing loss, visual impairment, seizures, and learning disabilities. The heart, kidneys, and adrenal glands may also be affected. Although some children develop long-lasting neurological problems from bacterial meningitis, most who receive prompt diagnosis and treatment recover fully.

The majority of cases of viral meningitis resolve with no complications.

Signs and Symptoms
The symptoms of meningitis vary and depend both on the age of the child and on which bacterium or virus is causing the infection. The symptoms of viral meningitis are usually milder than those of bacterial meningitis. However, symptoms of bacterial and viral cases can be similar, particularly in the early stages of the disease. This makes prompt, accurate identification of the infectious organism crucial to effective treatment and the patient's recovery.

The first symptoms of meningitis may surface several days after a child has had a cold and runny nose, diarrhea and vomiting, or other signs of a bacterial or viral infection. Some of the more common symptoms of meningitis include fever, lethargy (decreased consciousness), or irritability. Older children may complain of a headache, photophobia (eye sensitivity to light), and a stiff neck, which is often noted by the doctor during a physical exam.

Meningitis also can lead to skin rashes, although rashes caused by bacterial meningitis look different from those caused by viral meningitis. Seizures occasionally accompany meningitis as well.

Newborns and infants with meningitis may lack the classical signs described above and simply be extremely irritable or lethargic. Normally, infants who are not feeling well will be comforted when their mothers pick them up. However, a baby who has meningitis may display something called paradoxical irritability - when picking up and rocking a child makes the child more distressed. This can be a sign of irritated meninges.

Other symptoms of meningitis in infants can include: jaundice (a yellowish tint to the skin), a stiffness of the body and neck (neck rigidity), a mild fever, a lower-than-normal temperature, poor feeding, a weak suck, and a high-pitched cry. Parents may also notice bulging fontanelles on their baby's head. (Fontanelles are the soft spot at the top/front of the baby's skull, where the bones of the skull join and are still open at that age.)

Contagiousness
Most cases of meningitis result from infections that are contagious. The infectious agents usually spread from person to person in tiny drops of fluid from the throat and nose of someone who is infected. (This could be a person with either meningitis or, more likely, the common infection caused by that germ.) The drops may become airborne when the person coughs, laughs, talks, or sneezes. They then can infect others when people breathe them in or touch the drops and then touch their own noses or mouths.

Sharing food, drinking glasses, eating utensils, tissues, or towels may all transmit the infections as well. Some infectious organisms can spread through a person's stool, and someone who comes in contact with the stool - such as a child in day care - may contract the infection.

The infections most often spread between people who are in close contact, such as those who live together or people who are exposed by kissing or sharing eating utensils. Casual contact at school or work with someone who has one of these infections usually will not transmit the infectious agent.

It is important to remember that just because someone becomes infected with a particular bacterium or virus does not automatically mean that person will get meningitis. In most cases, the microorganism will simply cause a run-of-the-mill respiratory or gastrointestinal infection. In some instances, people may carry one of the germs that can cause meningitis without becoming ill at all. Even though they have no symptoms of disease, they can still spread the germ, however.

Patients with meningitis typically remain contagious while they still have symptoms. People who have bacterial meningitis can be contagious for about 24 hours after they begin taking antibiotics.

Prevention
Routine immunization of young adolescents will help prevent this rare but serious infection. Experts now recommend that kids who are 11 years old get vaccinated for meningococcal disease, a serious bacterial infection that can lead to meningitis. The vaccine is called quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine, or MCV4. Children who have not had the vaccine and are 15 years old, or entering high school should also get the vaccine. People who are entering college, and will be living in a dormitory setting should also get the vaccine.

Many of the bacteria and viruses that are responsible for meningitis are fairly common. Good hygiene is an important means of preventing any infection. Encourage your family members to wash their hands thoroughly and often, particularly before eating and after using the bathroom. Avoiding close contact with someone who is obviously ill and not sharing food, drinks, or eating utensils can help halt the spread of germs as well.

In certain cases of meningitis, doctors may decide to give antibiotics to anyone who has been in close contact with the person who is ill to help prevent additional cases of illness.

The vaccines against Hib, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, and pneumococcus can protect against meningitis caused by these microorganisms. Some high-risk children should also be immunized against certain types of meningococcus. Because bacterial meningitis is most likely to occur in confined settings such as college dorms, some colleges ask that incoming students be vaccinated against meningococcus. This vaccine may also be recommended for people who are traveling to countries where meningitis is more common.

Incubation
This varies with the organism causing the meningitis. The incubation periods for the most common causes of meningitis range from 2 days to 2 weeks.

Duration
Even with proper treatment, bacterial meningitis may take days (and sometimes weeks) to resolve, and recovery from its effects may take even longer. Most cases of viral meningitis resolve completely within 1 to 2 weeks.

Professional Treatment
Any child with possible meningitis needs aggressive diagnosis and treatment. First the doctor will take a history and perform a physical examination. If meningitis is suspected, the doctor will order laboratory tests to help make the diagnosis. The tests will likely include a lumbar puncture (spinal tap) to collect a sample of spinal fluid. This sample will be examined for signs of inflammation and cultured for the organism that may be causing the infection.

It is crucial to fight cases of bacterial meningitis quickly. If a child is diagnosed with (or strongly suspected to have) bacterial meningitis, doctors will start intravenous antibiotics as soon as possible, often before the exact microorganism causing the infection has been pinpointed. Once the infectious agent is identified through laboratory tests, the antibiotics can be changed, if necessary, or discontinued if the patient turns out to have viral meningitis.

If the child is diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, he or she will be hospitalized and closely monitored. While in the hospital, the child will continue to receive antibiotics and may require intensive-care treatment. The child will receive fluids to replace those lost to fever, sweating, vomiting, and poor appetite, and may be given corticosteroids to help reduce inflammation of the meninges, depending on the cause of the disease.

Complications of bacterial meningitis may require specific treatment. For example, anticonvulsants can be given for seizures. If the child develops shock or low blood pressure, additional intravenous fluids and certain medications may be given to increase blood pressure. Some children may need supplemental oxygen or mechanical ventilation if they have difficulty breathing.

A child who has viral meningitis may also be hospitalized, although some children are allowed to recover at home if they do not seem to be too ill. With the exception of medication for the herpes simplex virus, there are no medications to fight the agents that cause viral meningitis, so treatment is usually aimed at relieving the child's symptoms. This includes rest, fluids, and over-the-counter pain medication.

Some patients who have had meningitis may require longer-term follow-up. One of the most common problems resulting from bacterial meningitis is impaired hearing, and children who have had bacterial meningitis should have a hearing test following their recovery.

Home Treatment
Any child with suspected meningitis should be seen by a doctor. Once a diagnosis has been made, all patients with bacterial meningitis and many with viral meningitis will be treated in the hospital. Older children whose laboratory tests show no signs of bacterial meningitis and who have milder symptoms may be sent home to recover. There they should get plenty of rest and drink lots of fluids. If necessary, acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) or ibuprofen (such as Advil or Motrin) can be used to relieve fever and headache.

Children who recover at home need to be closely watched by their parents and followed by their doctors. If the condition of a child recuperating at home worsens, the child should go to the emergency department right away.

When to Call Your Child's Doctor
Seek medical attention immediately if you suspect your child has meningitis or if your child exhibits symptoms such as vomiting, headache, lethargy or confusion, neck stiffness, rash, and fever. Infants who have fever, irritability, poor feeding, and lethargy should be assessed by a doctor right away.

If your child has had contact with someone who has meningitis (for example, in a child-care center or a college dorm), call your child's doctor to determine whether your child should take preventive medication.

Reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, MD
Date reviewed: March 2004
Originally reviewed by: Neil Izenberg, MD


Note: All information on KidsHealth is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

©1995-2006 The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved.
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Corn View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Corn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2006 at 9:52pm

coool. guess i'll slpurge for the extra $220 on the both of us. between Tamiflu 2 doses and the pneumonia and menegitis thats'over $600.

Include thousands on basic preps and if the BF don't get me a heart attack from seeing the bill will.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2006 at 7:50am

Pneumonia Vaccine  Shot. I just wanted to let you all know that I tried to get my children the Pneumonia Vaccine shot and was turned away. Mainly because no one wants to give it, my doctors says to go to the community health department and they say go to my doctor’s office. After the run-a-round they both told me that they wouldn’t do it because my children were not in high risk groups. After I explained that they all have had lung infections before, they still refused. After explaining that it would help against the Avian Flu if it were to hit, the community health nurse laughed at me, saying “Do you have chickens and or kiss them.” I of course said “No” and she said, “Then there you have nothing to worry about”, “besides”, she said, “it will never go human to human.”

After this I really understood how much trouble we are all in. Do not rely on the government nor the healthcare providers. I have had too many of them laugh this off and not even prepare for this. I guess I am done venting.

As a note I do have a nebulizer and meds for it as a backup.

April

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kathie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2006 at 9:38am

got my pneu. vaccine today at the health department.  i am 55 and my husband is 57 and they advised us that we will need another one when we turn 65 years of age.

we were also advised that it will take 2-3 weeks from the time you get the vaccine for it to be effective.

 

kathie

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2006 at 10:37am

Good job Kathie!

April, you can go to any clinic and get it.  It will cost more though, but you can get it at just a normal walkin clinic.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bruss01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2006 at 10:45am

Myself and my wife both got the vaccines (flu and pneumovax 23) when they brought a visiting nurse to the place where I work.  Since I am a contractor, we had to pay, vs. employees who got the vaccines free. It's a state agency, I guess they don't want to be decimated in the event of an outbreak.  Cost us 20 bucks for the flu, 30 for the pneumonia, so for 100 bucks we're all set - money well spent.

The visiting nurse really, really resisted giving us the pneumovax, saying it was really only for old people.  We good naturedly kept insisting, "yah, well, I think we'll go ahead and get it anyway".  She eventually relented, since we were first in line and were holding up the works.  But she wasn't happy about it.

The flu shot was a little sore for a few hours, and went away.  The pneumovax, however... OW!  our arms were plenty sore for several days.  Wow.  Guess we really needed it.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2006 at 11:15am
Good job Bruss01!  Good job not taking no for answer.  It's important to get this done at all costs.   !
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Corn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2006 at 12:04am
got the shots. tell Albert.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2006 at 4:51am

YAAA BUDDY !

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AuntBones Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2006 at 5:15am
Why do SOME health care workers act as if THEY are paying for your vaccine out of their paycheck! Everyday we a bombarded in regards to taking our health into our own hands. Funny most doctors are very pro active to  EKG, Bloodwork,Chest Xrays, Colon scopes, M  Grams for us women.....I could keep listing, but you all get the picture here.How many people just follow the doctors advice and get all the testing done....many do. Seems like when YOU are pro active, falls on deaf ears.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2006 at 3:37pm

Has anyone had their children to receive this shot? If so how old were they? I can not get anyone to do to around here and my Dr. asked me to go to another provider due to he has different beliefs on the subject. No harsh words, just frustration.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rocky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2006 at 5:33pm
Forgive me for cross-posting. I see that others have had the same
problem I have had...getting the pneumonia vaccine for people
under age 65?

I can't find a Health Dept (WA State) whoe would consider vaccinating my
family. I have grown children ages 30-45 (all teachers) and 2 school-age
grandkids.

Anyone have any suggestions? BTW The Health Dept. did recommended
anyone 65 or older who had the pneumonia vaccine 5 or more years ago,
to get a booster.

To me, this situation is particularly alarming because if we do have a
pandemic and it is anything like 1918, the worst hit were the younger
people (about 20-40 year olds) in good health, with strong immune
systems. As I understand it, their deaths were caused by a violent
immune system reaction to the pneumonia following the original virus.

Thanks

Prepare for the Unexpected!
Rocky
http://www.homeemergencyusa.com
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2006 at 6:05pm
That's not cross -posting.   Not being able to get vaccinated is a serious issue.   Any walk-in clinic in the country will give you the vaccination, no questions asked.  Of course, they will charge you more, but at least they will do it. 
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