Click to Translate to English Click to Translate to French  Click to Translate to Spanish  Click to Translate to German  Click to Translate to Italian  Click to Translate to Japanese  Click to Translate to Chinese Simplified  Click to Translate to Korean  Click to Translate to Arabic  Click to Translate to Russian  Click to Translate to Portuguese


Forum Home Forum Home > General Discussion > General Discussion
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - SERIOUSLY CLEVER MEDICINE
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

SERIOUSLY CLEVER MEDICINE

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Technophobe View Drop Down
Senior Moderator
Senior Moderator
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2014
Location: Scotland
Status: Offline
Points: 46600
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: SERIOUSLY CLEVER MEDICINE
    Posted: March 09 2018 at 3:37am

Bacteria-hunting virus fished from Connecticut lake treats infected doctor

By Bill Hathaway
March 8, 2018

An anti-bacterial virus found in a Connecticut lake successfully treated an 80-year-old doctor with a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection in his heart, a Yale team of scientists and doctors reported March 8 in the journal Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

The case study suggests that the viruses, called bacteriophages, could be an effective treatment against many drug-resistant infections, said the researchers.

The Connecticut doctor suffered from an infection after he received an aortic arch replacement operation and required massive doses of antibiotics to keep him alive. But the bacteria infecting his heart, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, had developed a resistance to drug treatment. His physician, Dr. Deepak Narayan, was then contacted by research scientist Benjamin Chan who had been screening natural samples for bacteriophage to see if these viruses might be effective against drug-resistant infections. He told Narayan that a virus-hunting expedition at Dodge Pond in Connecticut netted a bacteriophage with affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and suggested that experimental phage therapy might be used to combat the infection.

After Narayan surgically administered hundreds of thousands of tiny bacteriophages into the patient’s chest, the viruses successfully killed the bacteria and the patient was found to be free of infection.

Co-author Paul Turner, Yale’s Elihu Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and acting dean of science, explained that the bacteriophage, known as OMKO1, attached to proteins on the surface of bacteria that allow them to pump-out antibiotics, and survive assault by these drugs. Once OMKO1 destroyed bacteria with these pumps, the only survivors were bacteria mutants without them, which are easy targets for antibiotics.

The bacteria are backed into an evolutionary corner,” Turner said.

Benjamin Chan, research scientist in Turner’s lab and first author of the study, said he and his colleagues are busy screening a variety of bacteriophages against other drug-resistant pathogens such as E. Coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

This new approach to countering that threat grew out of basic research on the process of evolution and also shows the value of biodiversity,” said Sam Scheiner, program director in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Environmental Biology.

Dr. Deepak Narayan is senior author of the paper.

The work was primarily funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and Project High Hopes Foundation.


Source:   https://news.yale.edu/2018/03/08/bacteria-hunting-virus-fished-connecticut-lake-treats-infected-doctor

Related

Technophobe:  I highlighted the really clever bit in yellow.

Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
Back to Top
carbon20 View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: April 08 2006
Location: West Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 23531
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 09 2018 at 4:06pm
I first heard about Phages about 30 years ago,the only trick is,finding the right phage out of the millions that there are, and they are the very last resort ,because the science is in its early early stages,
I do stand to be corrected on that
12 Monkeys...............
1995 ‧ Science fiction film/Thriller ‧ 2h 11m a must for AFT
Back to Top
Technophobe View Drop Down
Senior Moderator
Senior Moderator
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2014
Location: Scotland
Status: Offline
Points: 46600
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 09 2018 at 4:22pm
Nah!  You are right.  It is still in its infancy.

Science has a nice habit of accelerating though, so fingers crossed.
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down