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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Now tracking the Aussie Flu.

Feral Dogs - A Potential Problem?

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bruss01 View Drop Down
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    Posted: January 25 2006 at 6:44pm

This is perhaps an aspect of a pandemic and the resulting shortages and economic chaos that many of us have not yet considered.

We have discussed at length here about the need for people to keep food and water on hand  in the event that the normal supply channels for these essentials is disrupted.  Many here have wisely extended this initiative in laying in backup supplies for their domestic companion animals.  However, just as we realize that many oblivious people will fail to heed the warnings, and in turn subject themselves to great privation, the question arises:  What will these "grasshoppers" do about their domestic animals?  Specifically the concern centers around dogs.  There are many people who feel that their dog is a member of the family, equal to their children, who must be fed before they themselves will eat. Conversely, there are those who consider Fido as an expendable asset, and in times of great privation, a headcount to be downsized.

The more courageous and astute will take the proper step of euthanizing an animal for whom they can no longer provide.  However, there may be many who will lack the courage or the foresight to deal effectively with their unwanted dog, and will simply turn him loose to "fend for himself".  Imagine this scenario taking place in households all over your community, 10, 100 or 1000 times.  In normal times, there will be animal shelters and dog-catchers to take these unwanted dogs off the street, but during a crisis, these services are apt to fall short or be entirely non-existent.  What then becomes of these newly feral carnivores?  Can you imagine 1000 desperately hungry carnivores, reverting to their instincts, forming packs, and roaming the streets of your city?  Our nation has previous experience with this scenario to an extent in the Great Depression, and to a lesser extent in many of the subsequent economic downturns.  The results are not pretty, nor are they for the faint of heart.

Here are some accounts of formerly domestic and feral dogs, following their instincts and "fending for themselves". 

http://www.webpal.org/a_reconstruction/immediate/death/dogs. htm

http://www.survival-center.com/buckshot/moredogs.htm

http://www.survival-center.com/buckshot/dogs3.htm

http://www.survival-center.com/buckshot/dogs3-more.htm

I am a great dog lover, in fact I have placed my dog of 12 years at the head of my "must have" list for getting thru a pandemic, simply because of the great love and emotional rapport we share.  However, the threat of feral and probably starving dogs running loose in packs during a pandemic is one that I feel must be considered, and the possibility taken very seriously.

For this reason (and for others) if I need to go outside during a pandemic I will most definitely be armed.



Edited by bruss01
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 25 2006 at 7:02pm
A hungry dog will eat just about anything. I've had several people ask me about this lately, those who are concerned for their pets and themselves.  You can prepare for your dog the same food you will eat.  A picky dog won't eat it - until he/she is hungry and then they'll definitely eat it.

But with food in short supply, you are quite right about feral animals (not just dogs, this could affect a whole bunch of domesticated animals).

It's one thing to consider your own pets - but what can you do about all the others?

Feral dogs at 'my house' will be shot, IF they are outside (nearby) and problematic.  Otherwise, I'd probably leave them alone.  Who knows is they'll make it on their own?  They will undoubtedly revert to a certain wildness in any case and some animals will adapt. 

It's doubtful that I'd attempt to feed them however.  The coyotes are pretty thick here and would quickly dispatch them in any case.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 25 2006 at 11:59pm

I hate to say it but I watched a survival program about being lost in the woods... the one thing I remember was the statement "if it has hair you can eat it"

Dogs have hair.

I wonder if people will get desperate enough to... you know...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 26 2006 at 12:01am
P.S. Please dont send me a bunch of mean PMs for that. I LOVE DOGS, especially my dog!!! I was just wondering out loud.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 26 2006 at 7:18am

i AM SO GLAD SOMEONE PUT OUT THIS POST BECAUSE IM  NOT THAT ARTICULATE AND I KNOW THAT PEOPLE ON THIS FORUM CARE ABOUT  THEIR PETS AND ARE PLANNING FOR THEIR CARE 

 BUT THERE DOSE NEED TO BE SOME PLANNING AROUND  THE ANIMAL POPULATION MY HOPE IS THAT SOMEONE MORE ARTICULATE  THAN ME  CAN REACH OTHER WEB SITES WITH A PRO-ACTIVE  CARING PLAN FOR ANIMALS  

 i WILL STOP TALKING ABOUT THIS ON MY POSTS BECAUSE I FEEL THAT  THERE ARE PEOPLE MORE QUALIFIED AND ARTICULATE  TO ADDRESS THIS ISSUE ALREADY POSTING  ON THIS FORUM 

THANK YOU  

 



Edited by RBARNES55
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swankyc View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote swankyc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 28 2006 at 9:02pm

I wonder what my wife would say to eating an Odie sandwich. 

 

My 5yr old son named his new dog Odie after he got the name from Garfield. 

I'm not afraid, I'm paranoid. Dont talk too loud, they are listening.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 28 2006 at 9:13pm

Odie sandwich aside...shame on you swank!

I have shot & killed one dog in the protection of my son when he was five years old.  I would do it again, in a heartbeat.  Ferrel animals are dangerous and dogs are naturally pack animals.  They will join up and they will attack anything or anyone they feel is weaker.

I am prepping for my own animals as they are true members of my family.  But I can also say from experience that animals that are turned out from their homes will gravitate to where other animals are, wanting to join the pack.  We have taken in strays over the years that have found their way to our yard because of our resident dogs.  Thousands of dollars have been invested in getting these animals back to a healthy existence all because some people can't be responsible enough to take care of them or place them with someone who can.  And as stated above if it comes down to it euthanizing an animal is much kinder than turning them loose in the world to fend for themselves.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote swankyc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 28 2006 at 10:03pm

Come on now, have faith in me.  I'm not going to be eating my dog anytime soon.  we've gotten alot of food for him as well.

I'm not afraid, I'm paranoid. Dont talk too loud, they are listening.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janetn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2006 at 3:15pm
This is going to be a big problem. We had a pack of wild dogs a few years ago. They ripped the throat out of one of our goats. CryI stepped out of the door one of the dogs snarled and started toward me. Got back in the house fast. They had no fear whatsoever. I plan on running some electric fence around my yard and garden for that and deer that eat my garden. Got a solar fencer cheap last fall.
 
There is no choice but to kill a dofg if its a hazard Ouch-much as we would hate to. its a matter of saftey
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sweetpea Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2006 at 3:39pm
So where do you think the infamous "dog soldiers" came from?
 
Feral dogs were a big problem in our Navajo nation about 30 years ago where they roamed around in packs and stalked and attacked several children, hitchhikers and "sheepherders," and they killed alot of livestock.  They sent the "proper" authorities to track them down and kill them, humanely as possible, of course.  These were the range and livestock personnel.  So, yes - feralled dogs can become a big problem.  Please, if you feel you may  not be able to feed them in the future - get them fixed and/or turn them in to shelters.
If you want to go a different course and keep your dog, there are actually recipes floating around cyberspace for making dogfood - mostly turn out like biscuits flavored with broth.  I haven't tried it, just looked it over just in case - our Huskie thinks we're his pack, he's become too dependant on us - his special attachment is to a DD and DH "Daddy" is the alpha male.
"When an emergency arises, the time for preparation is past."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wraith Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2006 at 8:15pm
Where I hunt there used to be 2 packs of wild dogs and let me tell you they  WILL attack you and try their best to kill you. They decimated the deer population, they attacked my cousin and it was kill or be killed, they attacked my dad and my sister and again it was kill or be killed, they destroyed our camp once trying to get to our food. If you don't want to become a part of the food chain then there can be no hesitation and pray that you only have one to deal with because having to engage multiple targets as they charge you is not like in the movies.
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape, finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. Voltaire

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2006 at 11:21pm
If it gets to the point that there are feral dogs roaming around, I will not hesitate to take them out if they present even a potential threat.  Those dogs will be feeding on anything they can find which likely means they carry the BF virus.  I suspect even a minor bite from the dog could infect a human being.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote randyb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 31 2006 at 5:04am
Lots of dogs in our area, (BTW I love dogs and think they truly are mans/womans best friend.  In fact my blood hound may have saved my life/ serious injury on two seperate occasions)  Feral dogs will not be a problem in my area though, too many guns and folks willing to shoot. I have two neighobors that are LEO and I think 90% of the males in my county hunt.  To also put it in simple terms, if a dog is threatening to my children, it won't be around long.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 31 2006 at 6:58am
My neighbor has 6 bulldogs, and they are kind of wild as it is, since he hasn't done much to train them (he is in his seventies and his health isn't too good). I'm almost sure he hasn't prepped at all, or even know much about BF. Makes me wonder how his dogs will start acting when TSHTF.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote roxy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 31 2006 at 7:05am
 thanks for starting this thread,  will add to the list to finnish fencing in backyard,  to save my 2 dogs, and the garden, this list is getting longer lol, roxy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Elizabeth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 31 2006 at 6:10pm
Everyone around me has dogs.  I would be worried about this, if we did not also have Coyotes and Mountain Lions.  It's sad to think of, but I don't think they would make it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sybdragon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2006 at 11:11am
food for the non preppers, as they will eat anything once they get hungry too, and the dogs will come to you looking for food so you don't have to wander around the woods looking for a deer or anything   LOL  LOL
 
(this is joking Tongue )
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calendula Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2006 at 11:19am
I keep my 2 small dogs indoors, have fenced yard, and enclosed a piece of it so the dogs would not come in contact with bird poop when going outside, I also bought for them all terrain boots up to their thighs for protection, crazy isn't it?  but I love them and I would like for them to be safe and survive this BF.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janetn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 12 2006 at 2:59pm
Hungry feral dogs will not only attack small dogs They will attack children and sometimes adults.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Samoa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 25 2006 at 5:15pm
Until I was eight years old my family lived in Ft. Smith in the Northwest Territories of Canada.  One of my earliest chilhood memories was of bringing the HGuskies into the house during hard winter nights when wolves would come into town.  The dogs knew the wolves were outside and were determined to get back out there.  I must have been about three, that would make it 1955.  When you're a little kid, things like that make a BIG impression.  Packs of roaming dogs would most certainly become something to consider if BF gets as bad as it might.  
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