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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

What can be done to save our pets?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote flick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 29 2006 at 5:52am
I forgot to add:
To attach the elastic;
You can either make a casing for it; fold over a 1/4 inch (dont forget to add this to your initial measurement)   sew the bottom seam  of the hem leaving a small opening to thread the elastic thru. thread the elastic with a safety pin thru the casing .pull to tighten the elastic and sew the elastic together.
Or just use the zigzag on the machine.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 29 2006 at 6:14am
I put booties on my Australiain Shep. .... he's allergic to the 'rust' that grows on our grass for a couple of weeks each summer .... I use INFANT BABY Socks! You can buy pkgs of 6 or 8.  Look for the tight fitting ones and then you can just wash them in a bleach mix, if you buy white.  They work great. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2006 at 6:13pm
ReadyMom thanks for the great idea! I've been wondering
how to protect my dog. I have a Great Dane, so the tent
idea is out, and going on papers in the house is not an
option!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GrizzlyGirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2006 at 12:39am
Originally posted by Enumclaw,WA Enumclaw,WA wrote:

We have 3 German Shorthaired Pointers. We had 4 but our oldest who was also our first we had to put down in October. I trained her for hunting from the time she was a baby. She was our hunting companion and dear friend. Getting rid of the other 3 which we have also trained from puppies after what we went through in October is not an option. The 2, 3 year olds are our 6 year olds pups. These dogs have to run. So run they will. We have a fenced back yard Ĺ Acre. They will run there under supervision. Iím not going to be paranoid about bird droppings on the ground. If  I get that paranoid then I would worry about the mice, spiders, ants, bugs, Etc. that will still get into your house. They could have the virus on there feet. If you get rid of all your catís then there will be a mouse explosion like you have never seen. I plan on keeping my cats inside and putting lotís of mouse traps on the outside. If a cat getís out it is now an outside cat. Our dogís feet will be wiped off with disinfectant when they come in from outside. Our dogs are our children. If  I canít have my children then you might as well just shoot me. This is non negotiable. Period. Dead

Be careful what you wipe you dog's feet with because alot of disinfectants are highly toxic to dogs and small amounts can cause liver or kidney failure fairly quickly. ANother option would be to make disposable bootie for your dogs out of baggies and baby booty socks. Just put the baggies on their feet (cut any ziploc off) and then secure it on their feet with a baby bootiy. This way they will still be able to romp and when they come in all you do is drop the booties in some bleach water to ruese again and throw away the used baggies. Hope this helps.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fritz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2006 at 7:11am
Vet says a 30:1 bleach solution should do the job to disinfect doggie feet. I do like the baby bootie idea and I will go get some this week and try them on them. This still does require purchasing a whole lot of baggies!! I'm gonna watch for the sales on the store brand kind!!
"I am only one; but still I am one, I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." -- Hellen Keller
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mississipp Mama Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 16 2006 at 8:58pm
  Hi Justme, thanks for the tent idea I will be looking for one soon.  I had been racking my brains over how to protect our dogs.  With your idea, I don't have to try and build anythings.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2006 at 6:11am

I thinkyou should test the baggie-bootie combo idea, first --- make sure they won't slip off their paws. With the baggie being on first, the innter layer will be slippery.  I've got both, here @ home, but I'm sitting here reading this.  I'll give it a try, this morning.  You would need to make sure you have nice tight infant socks to stop the slipping!-k

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2006 at 8:20am
Originally posted by Enumclaw,WA Enumclaw,WA wrote:

We have 3 German Shorthaired Pointers. We had 4 but our oldest who was also our first we had to put down in October. I trained her for hunting from the time she was a baby. She was our hunting companion and dear friend. Getting rid of the other 3 which we have also trained from puppies after what we went through in October is not an option. The 2, 3 year olds are our 6 year olds pups. These dogs have to run. So run they will. We have a fenced back yard Ĺ Acre. They will run there under supervision. Iím not going to be paranoid about bird droppings on the ground. If  I get that paranoid then I would worry about the mice, spiders, ants, bugs, Etc. that will still get into your house. They could have the virus on there feet. If you get rid of all your catís then there will be a mouse explosion like you have never seen. I plan on keeping my cats inside and putting lotís of mouse traps on the outside. If a cat getís out it is now an outside cat. Our dogís feet will be wiped off with disinfectant when they come in from outside. Our dogs are our children. If  I canít have my children then you might as well just shoot me. This is non negotiable. Period. Dead

I am so very glad to hear that you are comitted to your dogs. I feel the same way about my cats. But, please, don't forget to wipe down their coats with anti-bacterial wipes after they have been outside. Same thing as taking off your clothes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2006 at 8:34am
Originally posted by Hydrangea Hydrangea wrote:

Very informative website. It answered a question I had intended to post here about cat food. Almost everything my cats eat contains poultry. It would be horrible to feed my kitty-girls BF tainted food and then hear about a recall. According to the website "most commercial cat foods are cooked above temperatures required to kill H5N1 virus." Of course I still plan to stock up on kitty food and the sooner I do it the better.

My 4 cats are all indoor-only. They enjoy sitting by the screened back door watching birds flutter around feeders. For now feeding the birds has stopped. My only other immediate concern is caring for one of my two 19-year-olds who has chronic renal failure. I absolutely have to get over my fear of needles- very large needles- and learn to administer the lactated Ringers that she now receives by subcutaneous drip twice a week at the vets' office. Not only do I worry about her picking up a BF infection from other animals, especially when it first appears, but I wonder about the supply of Ringers which is also used to hydrate humans. If there were to be a pandemic I'm sure that the humans would have priority.

OH, hon, you go to a vet twice a week for the drip?? Goodness, it it so easy to do yourself, you'll save yourself a fortune!!!! Please, have your vet show you how!! The nice thing is, that you can stock up on supplies for your pet. The vet will give extra needles, they can also be re-used by soaking them in bleach for at least 10 minutes. You will need extra ringers, but since your baby only gets about 100cc's daily, if that much, one last's for quite a while. Find out from your vet how he/she stores them and then figure how how many you will need for the period of time you're prepping for and then add some. You're absolutely correct, ringers will disappear!!!!
As far as your fear of needles - I don't mean to hurt your feelings at all or be rude - but, suck it up! We're all going to have to deal with stuff that scares us. Don't forget the old definition of fear : False Evidence Appearing Real! I'm uncomfortable with needles too, but what's there to be afraid off? They're not going to attack you!!Wink 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GrizzlyGirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2006 at 3:45pm
Originally posted by fritz fritz wrote:

Vet says a 30:1 bleach solution should do the job to disinfect doggie feet. I do like the baby bootie idea and I will go get some this week and try them on them. This still does require purchasing a whole lot of baggies!! I'm gonna watch for the sales on the store brand kind!!
 
Try places like Walmart, K-Mart, Target and the Dollar Stores. They may not be "Ziploc" but they will definitley do in times of need for dog booties. I found some at a local grocery outlet and they were alot cheaper than the grocery store. Also, make a run to Costco or Sam's club (or maybe even a restaurant supply store) where you can buy baggies in bulk quantities. This should stock you up with plenty of baggies for your pets.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GrizzlyGirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2006 at 3:51pm
[QUOTE=ReadyMom]

I thinkyou should test the baggie-bootie combo idea, first --- make sure they won't slip off their paws. With the baggie being on first, the innter layer will be slippery.  I've got both, here @ home, but I'm sitting here reading this.  I'll give it a try, this morning.  You would need to make sure you have nice tight infant socks to stop the slipping!-k

I have a Chow/Husky/shepherd mix and she weighs approximately 75 lbs. I fashioned "baggie'booties for her and since she is bigger, baby socks work great at holding the baggie on her feet. If the booties aren't big enough, get preemie socks and if they are too small, get toddler ones. Also, another quick tip to note is to keep their toenails trimmed. I had to trim my dogs' nails before the baggie booties worked well because her toenails kept poking holes in the baggie. I have noticed now that her nails are trimmed blunt, the baggie has held up. As far as the slippery-ness if you secure the baggie on the dogs feet with a cotton type baby bootie sock, then the sock prevents it from being slippery. Another thing you can try is getting the baby socks that have stciky soles to keep baby from slipping on the floor. Of course these booties may be tto big for anyone who has a small dog.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Evergreen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2006 at 4:09pm
Know just what ya mean. I've been giving my 18-yr-old Ringers daily since last June. If you get 18 or 19 guage needles, it seems to be okay for him. Smaller size needles mean a super s-l-o-w drip that gets him antsy after a time. I, too, was squeemish about needles. I just had to "bite the bullet" a couple of times to insert the needle and my cat didn't wince at all. I still don't like inserting the needle, but he seems to tolerate it pretty well and he feels so much better afterwards. Also, I order a case of Ringers from my vet (got a 10% discount) and a couple of the IV assemblys that need to be changed out every 2 Ringers. I agree with your concern, it could very well be that Ringers might be in short supply. I'm going to order another case right away. Thanks for the heads up.

Originally posted by Hydrangea Hydrangea wrote:

Very informative website. It answered a question I had intended to post
here about cat food. Almost everything my cats eat contains poultry. It
would be horrible to feed my kitty-girls BF tainted food and then hear
about a recall. According to the website "most commercial cat foods are
cooked above temperatures required to kill H5N1 virus." Of course I
still plan to stock up on kitty food and the sooner I do it the better.

My 4 cats are all indoor-only. They enjoy sitting by the screened back
door watching birds flutter around feeders. For now feeding the birds
has stopped. My only other immediate concern is caring for one of my
two 19-year-olds who has chronic renal failure. I absolutely have to
get over my fear of needles- very large needles- and learn to
administer the lactated Ringers that she now receives by subcutaneous
drip twice a week at the vets' office. Not only do I worry about her
picking up a BF infection from other animals, especially when it first
appears, but I wonder about the supply of Ringers which is also used to
hydrate humans. If there were to be a pandemic I'm sure that the humans
would have priority.



    
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Evergreen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2006 at 4:17pm
   Femvet wrote: ...."The vet will give extra needles, they can also be re-used by soaking them in bleach for at least 10 minutes."

I just learned something. I can soak needles in bleach, WOW! Can I soak the drip assembly, too? The only thing about the needles is that they will get dull - bummer. Thanks for the information.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Luna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 23 2006 at 8:03pm
I'm getting confused about the wild bird thing. If the flu mutates to easily infect people it will then be a human flu. Different than the H5N1 that the birds are spreading around. So we'll only be able to get it from other people, not wild birds except in rare cases that don't spread. And, dogs and other animals only very, very rarely if ever get human flus. Only if the human form is somehow transmitted back to wild birds will other birds catch and spread it, and that doesn't seem likely. The only flu virus that dogs have ever caught is the new dog flu that they got from horses. There is one case of possible H5N1 in one dog. Think of all the dogs and cats that have eaten raw infected poultry and so very few of them have caught it and certainly never passed it to people.
<p>
Am I missing something? I thought I was pretty well read on this subject so this has me confused.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Proudest Monkey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 24 2006 at 7:31am

Quote If the flu mutates to easily infect people it will then be a human flu. Different than the H5N1 that the birds are spreading around. So we'll only be able to get it from other people, not wild birds except in rare cases that don't spread.


If a pandemic occurs, wild birds will be the least of my concerns.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote copecin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 24 2006 at 2:08pm
 I read in the news earlier today that somewhere in the East that a family of seven lost six of their family to Avain Flu, caught from person to person. Not too sure, but I think it has began.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Merivel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 10 2006 at 9:12pm
    Hi, I believe dogs cannot get the virus, only cats. and no need to expose the pets to germs, let them go on papers during the times of quarantine. i am going to keep my pets existence a secret from any authorities if they start to have rules about cats like they do about chickens being euthanized. dogs are our best friends, they wouldn't be wanting us put down even though we are carriers of the disease.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote koolsteve Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 19 2006 at 12:11am
An interesting thing to think about, that i have been thinking about, is if the BF dosn't wipe out humanity, it may kill off several species that didnt get vaccinated, causing a chain reaction of events inthe food chain. Think about it, if it kills too many birds, theyll be 100x as many worms , bugs etc. than before, if it kills too many cats theyll be 100x rats and mice than before, wich are very good at spreading diesase. iuse your imagination and think about this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GingerSnap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 07 2007 at 3:14pm
Influenza can be successfully treated homeopathically.  Doesn't matter whether it is a person or a dog or a cat.  It does require you learn how homeopathy works, but it is a ready answer to the concern some may have of what to do if their furfriend gets sick.
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Originally posted by Cindy Cindy wrote:

  Shocked  Why have I not heard anything about our pets? Does anyone know how we can protect them, and why there has been no discussion on a possible shot to prevent them from getting sick? 
Hi  some info for pet owners and vets on next thread down http://www.avianflutalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=14087   its a longish post here is a little..................  this is from March 2006 from FAO .Protection etc ....
 

Recommendations
Areas where H5N1 HPAI has been diagnosed or is suspected in poultry or wild birds:

Report to the local veterinary authority any evidence of significant bird mortality both wild and domestic
Be especially vigilant for any dead or sick cats and report such findings to the local vet
Make sure contact between cats and wild birds or poultry (or their faeces) is avoided and/or keep cats inside
If cats bring a sick or dead bird inside the house, put on plastic gloves and dispense of the bird in plastic bags for collection by local veterinary animal handlers
Keep stray cats outside the house and avoid contact wit them
If cats show breathing problems or nasal discharge, a veterinarian should be consulted
Do not touch or handle any sick-looking or dead cat (or other animal) and report to the authorities
Wash hands with water and soap regularly and especially after handling animals and cleaning their litter boxes or coming in contact with faeces or saliva
Dogs can only be taken outside the premises if kept restraint
Do not feed any water birds
Disinfect (e.g. with bleach 2-3 %) cages or other hardware with which sick animals have been transported or been in contact with.
Wash animal blankets with soap or any other commercial detergent


Information for veterinarians

back


Avian influenza in other animal species
Hosts: Wildbird hosts for H5N1 in order of importance are probably Anatidae (ducks, geese, swans), Charadriiform (gulls and shorebirds) and Passeriform (sparrows and starling). Lately swans have been found infected with H5N1 in a number of European countries (e.g. Austria, Germany, France and Romania, etc.). In poultry, both aquatic and terrestrial species become infected but the virus is particularly aggressive in chicken.

Carnivores: can become infected, after consuming infected poultry that succumbed to the disease. To date no H5N1 clinical cases of dogs have been reported but in an unpublished study carried out in 2005 by the National Institute of Animal Health in Bangkok, researchers tested 629 village dogs and 111 cats in the Suphan Buri district of central Thailand. Out of these, 160 dogs and 8 cats had antibodies to H5N1, indicating that they were infected with the virus or had been infected in the past. An eqiune virus has recently shown up in dogs. This inter-species re-assortment is not uncommon for type A influenza viruses.

Pigs are known ďĄmixing vesselsĒ for different influenza virus subtypes and therefore present a risk for avian influenza virus re-asserting with a human influenza virus into a strain more apt to infect humans. Regarding the present H5N1 subtype, studies conducted in pigs in Vietnam yielded 8 animals out of the 3000 investigated pigs seropositive. None of the animals had any clinical signs and it was not possible to isolate any virus

Ruminants appear at lower risk. So far no cattle have been identified as carrying any influenza type A virus. Horses are susceptible to Influenza viruses but so far mainly H3N8 have been identified. Regular vaccination is carried out. Experimentally mice can be infected but their role in natural transmission has not been established.

Public health implications
Humans and other mammals need to come in contact with large amounts of virus to become infected. In case of an infection with H5N1, mammals and humans apparently only shed small amounts of virus, contributing to reduced risk of spread among themselves. Recent data from experimentally infected catsí evidenced extra-respiratory replication of the H5N1 and excretion of virus in faeces of cats need to be taken into consideration. Hygienic practices need to be re-enforced, frequent washing of hands with water and soap especially after handling animals, cleaning cat litter boxes as well as before and after the preparation of food.

Occupational health and safety
Veterinarians and their staff are specifically at risk of coming into contact with infected cats, in case the disease becomes more widespread among this species. Normally, veterinarians and their staff engage in frequent hand washing and disinfect examination tables and instruments to reduce the general risk of disease transmission among their patients and to protect the persons present in the consultation room from eventual exposure.

Advice for veterinarians
The following is advised for veterinarians:

Advice to pet owners (see above)
Be ware of possibility to receive (sick) cats infected with H5N1
Take hygienic measures when handling sick cats (gloves and surgical masks)
Take deep oro-pharyngeal swabs of suspected animals (e.g. animals with respiratory problems) and sent them to the laboratory clearly indicating the type of examination requested Support cases to be reported to veterinary authorities
Inform owners of suspected animals and provide them with clear and practical information, avoiding creating any panic among cat owners or the general public.
Provide veterinarians are advised to contact the Veterinary Authorities in their respective countries for specific instructions

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/avianflu/readings/index.html


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