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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Now tracking the Aussie Flu.

What to Do If You Get The Flu

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FluMom View Drop Down
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    Posted: January 13 2018 at 5:41pm
Ok guys, I am over 65 and have had a bout of pneumonia in the last 5 years (even with the pneumonia shot). Do I get Tamiflu ASAP will it help? I get really sick really fast guys. I am scared...this is a nasty flu!

Any suggestions?



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Diligent View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Diligent Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2018 at 7:01pm
Dear FluMom,

I'm sorry you may have the flu.
If you are reasonably sure you do have the flu, and our roles were reversed, I would certainly start myself on Tamiflu.
Or, preferably Relenza, if I could find it, and the expiration date had not yet been met.

Get well now.

Sincerely,
Diligent

P.S. I am not a physician.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 4:37am
How did you get pneumonia if you had a shot,?
12 Monkeys...............
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 5:22am
Dilligent has it about right, tamiflu is pretty weak an assistant, but can make a small difference.  Relenza is slightly better - but no miracles. 

Although this flu is widespread and nasty, it is not a big killer.  Tamiflu/relenza should help you avoid the worst of its aftermath. 

Vitamins D & A boost your immune system, especially D.  Vitamin C will do so as well but it needs zinc with it to work.  C works even better with bioflavinoids.

Most important of all:
keep drinking water or fruit juice and keep moving/upright.  I am not suggesting anything strenuous, you need rest for recovery, but lying down allows the lungs to clog up.  So potter about a bit occasionally and sit rather than lie down.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 5:26am
Carbon, there are lots of pneumonia strains.  The jab only covers the very nastiest ones.  The weak and middle-of-the-road ones are not covered by the jab.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 10:47am
I got the 23 strain pneumonia shot a few years back - and promptly got pneumonia for the first time. Techno's right. Lots of strains for one immunization to cover.

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"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote arirish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 1:32pm
Not to mention it doesn't cover bacterial pneumonia!
Buy more ammo!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 1:39pm
cheers for that,

my mistake ,

 i thought being a bactira not a virus a shot covered all....

down here they give the over 65s a pneumonia shot that suppose to cover for life, 

which will i guess but for only one strain......
12 Monkeys...............
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 2:06pm
National Pneumococcal Vaccination Program for Older Australians Why do I need vaccination against pneumococcal disease? Pneumococcal disease comprises a range of infections and can be life-threatening. Pneumococcal disease does not just affect children. People over the age of 65 years and young children under the age of 2 are at higher risk of contracting pneumococcal disease than the rest of the population. Even healthy persons aged 65 or over are at greater risk of contracting the disease. In 2003, there were 602 cases of serious pneumococcal disease, and 90 deaths, in Australians aged 65 years or over. Indigenous Australians are also more at risk than non-Indigenous Australians. For this reason, free vaccine is also available through the National Indigenous Pneumococcal and Infl uenza Immunisation Program for all Indigenous people over the age of 50 and those aged 15 to 49 who have medical risk factors. In adults, pneumococcal pneumonia is the most common form of serious (invasive) pneumococcal disease. It usually requires hospitalisation. Other forms of pneumococcal disease are infection around the brain (meningitis) and blood poisoning (septicaemia). Pneumococcal disease can occur at any time of the year, although infections seem to be more common during winter and spring. Vaccination will help protect you against pneumococcal disease. How can I protect myself? The pneumococcal vaccine used in the Program is called PneumoVax®23. It provides protection against the 23 most common strains of pneumococcal bacteria responsible for most cases of disease in adults in Australia. Because there are a small number of strains that aren’t covered by the vaccine, you should always seek medical help if you develop any of the signs and symptoms of pneumococcal disease, even if you have been vaccinated. How often do I need to be vaccinated? The recommended schedule for vaccinations in the 65 years or over age group is one dose on or near 65 years, then a single booster dose 5 years later. If you have received a pneumococcal vaccination within the last 5 years, you should consult your general practitioner or other immunisation provider about whether you require revaccination at this time. Revaccination within three years is not recommended due to the increased risk of local reactions. If I have previously had a pneumococcal infection do I still need to get vaccinated? There are many different types of pneumococcal bacteria, and infection with one type doesn’t provide immunity against the other types. Therefore, it is recommended that you do receive the vaccination. Where can I get the vaccine? The vaccine can be administered by your usual immunisation provider, general practitioner or local health care centre. The vaccine is free if you are 65 years or over. You do not need to purchase the vaccine from a pharmacist. Does the vaccine have any side effects? The vaccine is very safe. Some recipients may experience mild side effects following pneumococcal vaccination such as some pain or swelling at the injection site and, occasionally, low-grade fever. Like any medicine, vaccines can cause severe allergic reactions, but the chances are extremely remote. Where can I get more information? Further information is available from your general practitioner or local health centre, the Immunisation Infoline on 1800 671 811 or the Immunise Australia Program website at http://immunise.health.gov.au/olderaus/pneumococcal.htm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 2:32pm
It is usually bacterial pneumonia which capitalizes on an immune system weakened by a previous virus.  With that, antibiotics are of use, but not if they can't get to the bug to kill it.  Clogged lungs have a nice thick layer of mucus for the bugs to hide in. 

The adult vaccine protects against 23 strains of bacterial pneumonia.  There are about 90 of them in all.  There are just too many of them for one vaccine and so they went for the nastiest and the easiest to cover against.  Try as I might, I can't find the specific ones, but they include causers of pneumonia, sceptacemia and meningitis.   https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/pneumococcal-vaccination/?

Viral pneumonia is usually caused by either a flu virus, respiratory syncytal virus or parainfluenza**  https:///emedicine.medscape.com/article/300455-overview  The flu ones are treated with Tamiflu, Relenza and Zanamivir.  Although the assistance offered by the drugs is slight, they do shorten the time sick and that reduces both the lung damage and the peumonia risk.  Eccinacea helps as well.

After a virus, especially a bronchial one, the surface of the lung becomes cracked (microscopically) and leaks fluid.  Drinking lots of water helps to limit the cracking, by keeping the lungs' surface moist.  Once the damage has been done, a well hydrated system helps keep the stuff that leaked out thin and so easier to cough up.  This thinner stuff is more easily penetrated by immune system cells as well.  Taking an expectorant like guiaphenesin can help lots, but not if you are at all dehydrated.  It can't work without extra water.

If you can get your hands on real camphor (resin from a tree) which is absorbed both through inhalation and through the skin, of all the bronchiodialators (lung inflaters) it has two unique properties.  It is the only bronchiodialator which is not a vasoconstrictor (it helps the lungs work without straining the heart) and it suppresses the reproduction of pneumococci. (It does not kill bacterial pneumonia germs, but it stops them multiplying - buying your immune system time to work.  This is similar to the way rifampicin the antibiotic works - but over a much narrower spectrum.)  Vicks vapo rup contains camphor, lab made not natural, but it still works.  Natural is better, but Vicks will help a bit.

Your lungs evolved to work upright.  lying down immobile, because you feel so rough, actually makes things worse.  The lassitude which accompanies flu is itself protective, as too much exercise when under viral attack can damage all sorts of bodily systems.  So take things very easy, but don't stop completely or lie down all the time.  Sit up, watch tv, drink lots, potter about and eat a smidgen* more salt than usual, as this helps keep the hydration up.  It also lessens the chance that all that drinking will cause an electrolyte imbalance.

* I said smidgeon, not tons.  A cup of bovril every third or fouth rehydration water is quite sufficient.
** There are several others which can cause pneumonia, even measles can do it, but those are the commonest.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 3:03pm
Ps., swap your rice for buckwheat for a few days.  It tastes crap, but who cares when you are unable to taste anyway?  Buckwheat is stuffed full of bioflavanoids.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CRS, DrPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2018 at 8:02pm
I don't have much to add, everyone is giving good advice!  

Many times, I find that folks confuse common cold symptoms with the flu (I have a damn cold as I type this).   Viruses are almost impossible to avoid, and the antivirals are your best bet to lessen the course of the disease.  

What are the symptoms of the flu versus the symptoms of a cold?

The symptoms of flu can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue (tiredness). Cold symptoms are usually milder than the symptoms of flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems.

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/coldflu.htm

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Diligent Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 15 2018 at 11:04am
Dear FluMom,

How are you getting along ?

Sincerely,
Diligent
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 16 2018 at 10:54am
Behave yourself, Rishat.
"Buy it cheap. Stack it deep"
"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 16 2018 at 11:45am
He failed, JD.  He's gone.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 16 2018 at 3:15pm
Sorry guys I do not have the flu I am just scared shi^less that I will get it!

I am trying to figure out what will help if I get the flu.

Thanks for all the advice! My housecleaner was sick last week and I told her to stay home and told her to stay home this week too! I keep taking Zink and Vit. D. Again Thanks!
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