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Blue tongue in NL dog

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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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    Posted: December 21 2023 at 2:54am

[url]https://www.wur.nl/en/research-results/research-institutes/bioveterinary-research/show-bvr/bluetongue-found-in-dutch-dog.htm[/url] or https://www.wur.nl/en/research-results/research-institutes/bioveterinary-research/show-bvr/bluetongue-found-in-dutch-dog.htm ;

December 20, 2023

Bluetongue has been detected in a 3.5-year-old dog. The animal lived on a Dutch dairy farm with both cattle and sheep. Research by Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR, part of Wageningen University & Research) showed that the animal was infected with bluetongue virus type BTV-3/NET2023, the same virus currently found in sheep and cattle in the Netherlands.

The dog was seriously ill and showed shortness of breath, pulmonary oedema, severe emaciation and lethargy, among other symptoms. Based on the symptoms, the veterinarian reported a suspicion of bluetongue to the NVWA. Samples taken from the sick dog were examined by WBVR for the presence of bluetongue virus. “The PCR-test detected BTV. Partial sequencing confirmed BTV-3/NET2023 in the samples,” says WBVR researcher Melle Holwerda. In addition, the sample was tested for Brucella spp. This test was negative.

Rarity

“Bluetongue infection in dogs is really very rare,” according to Holwerda, head of the National Reference Laboratory for vector-borne viral animal diseases. “In the scientific literature, a few anecdotal cases of bluetongue-infected dogs have been reported.” The observations are not specific for certain dog breeds. Remarkably, these described cases were almost exclusively pregnant dogs. The bluetongue virus-infected dog in the Netherlands was also a pregnant.

Presence of virus

Little is known about a possible infection route of bluetongue in dogs, Holwerda says. “The scientific literature also offers few leads on this.” The infected dog lived on a livestock farm and was able to roam around freely. The animal had access to the stables and feeding parlours, and possibly also to colostrum or an afterbirth. At the time the dog became seriously ill, the livestock farm was not known yet to the NVWA as affected by BTV. Veterinarians from the NVWA and Royal GD visited the farm did not not notice diseased cattle or sheep. PCR-results of samples taken from the farm animals confirmed two BTV-3-positive cows. “This proves that the bluetongue virus was indeed present on the farm,” said Holwerda.

Route of infection

Bluetongue virus can rarely be found in dogs and wild carnivores, Holwerda knows. The presumed route of infection of these animals is eating raw meat or the afterbirth from BTV-infected ruminants or drinking colostrum which is contaminated with BTV-containing blood. “But transmission through a blood meal from an infected midge cannot be ruled out as an introduction route either.” Holwerda stresses that for this particular Dutch dog, the route of infection cannot be conclusively determined.

 Dogs are not a source for onward virus spread 
Melle Holwerda

The virus won’t spread further via a dog. “Dogs are not a source for onward virus spread,” Holwerda explained. Bluetongue is not a disease that can be transmitted from animals to humans.

Advice

“Bluetongue is common in worldwide. However, dogs with bluetongue infections are very rare. We therefore consider the likelihood of infection of dogs with bluetongue extremely low,” Holwerda said. However, alertness is still needed, especially with pregnant dogs that have access to afterbirths of infected cattle and sheep. “We recommend restricting dogs from the barn on farms and not allowing access to the calving pen. This prevents dogs from coming into contact with any afterbirth or blood from an bluetongue-infected animal.”

DJ... blue tongue in dogs would "hardly be possible" still it happened...

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 23 2023 at 10:19pm

DJ [url]https://www.wormsandgermsblog.com/2023/12/articles/animals/dogs/bluetongue-in-a-dog/[/url] or https://www.wormsandgermsblog.com/2023/12/articles/animals/dogs/bluetongue-in-a-dog/ ;

I’ll take a break from writing about widespread canine infectious respiratory disease complex (CIRDC) in North America to talk about a single case of a rare disease in a dog. Wageningen Veterinary Research has reported a case of Bluetongue infection in a dog in the Netherlands, a disease of significant consequence to livestock that’s recently been found again in the country.

DJ-My non-expert reaction/question....

We normally do not test for BlueTongueVirus (BTV)  in dogs because we do not expect to find any...

It’s interesting that someone considered bluetongue and tested the dog, especially since the disease wasn’t known to be present in cattle on the farm, though it was subsequently identified in two cattle after the dog’s diagnosis. Thanks to an astute vet and access to testing, a diagnosis of bluetongue was made through detection of BTV by PCR. Not surprisingly, it was the same strain of BTV that’s been circulating in sheep and cattle in the Netherlands.

DJ, if we would test farm cats (farm rats ???) , farm workers...people living near a farm would we have a (remote) chance of finding a trace of BTV in any of them ? 

In the UK H5N1-virus was detected in a small group of poultry workers...they had no (major) health issues...Still finding H5N1 may point to a chain of development/mutation/recombination of H5N1 in humans...NOT welcome to find ANY traces of H5N1 (my non expert view)...

BTV in dogs is supposed to be very rare...It may be time to increase testing (paid via tax as a study) in farm "mammals"...

Here in NL we did see a very major [url]https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q-koortsepidemie_in_Nederland[/url] or https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q-koortsepidemie_in_Nederland in 2007; 

-killing 95 (known) patients 

-4,026 known/confirmed infections

-very likely 50.000 to 100.000 people did catch Q-fever

-chronic Q-fever cases may run in the hundreds

[url]https://www.rivm.nl/q-koorts[/url] or https://www.rivm.nl/q-koorts 

So...BTV may follow the Q-fever route ? "from not supposed to be found in most mammals" to "widespread in humans and a few other species" ????

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 22 2024 at 8:56am

[url]https://www.gelderlander.nl/binnenland/domper-in-strijd-tegen-blauwtong-zuid-afrikaans-vaccin-valt-definitief-af~addcffbb/[/url] or https://www.gelderlander.nl/binnenland/domper-in-strijd-tegen-blauwtong-zuid-afrikaans-vaccin-valt-definitief-af~addcffbb/ NL story on South African vaccine not to be used in NL...also had ;

The minister further writes that a second infection in a dog is known. This concerns an animal that became ill last fall and has recovered. Antibodies against bluetongue have been detected in his blood. The dog probably contracted the virus when it came into contact with carcasses of sheep that had died of bluetongue.

DJ (must be from a pressrelease of agriculture ministerium......if I find the official NL press release I will put a link.)

Dogs were NOT expected to be able to catch BTV...very, very rare...

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
~Albert Einstein
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