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Does this sound like hemorrhagic fever to you?

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KiwiMum View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Does this sound like hemorrhagic fever to you?
    Posted: February 09 2024 at 1:31pm

I've just seen this news story in the UK's Daily Mail. Very odd. It sure sounds like hemorrhagic fever to me...........

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13065869/man-dies-lufthansa-flight-a380-bangkok-munich.html

and it's on a plane going to Germany.

Those who got it wrong, for whatever reason, may feel defensive and retrench into a position that doesn’t accord with the facts.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 09 2024 at 10:21pm

[url]https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/emerging-diseases-other-health-threats-alphabetical-a-thru-h/dengue/985439-thailand-2024-dengue[/url] or https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/emerging-diseases-other-health-threats-alphabetical-a-thru-h/dengue/985439-thailand-2024-dengue ;

Source: https://www.pattayamail.com/thailand...january-452055

Thailand reports 8,000 infections and 13 deaths from Dengue fever in January
By Pattaya Mail
February 8, 2024

Dengue fever has escalated into a significant concern in Thailand, with the Department of Disease Control (DDC) reporting over 8,000 infections and 13 fatalities in January.
DDC Director-General Thongchai Keeratihuttayakorn highlighted a sharp 91.25% increase in cases compared to January of the previous year, where 4,286 individuals were affected, noting as many as 8,197 people have contracted the disease so far...

and [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dengue_fever[/url] or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dengue_fever ;

Dengue fever (/ˈdɛŋɡi/ or /ˈdɛŋɡeɪ/) is a mosquito-borne tropical disease caused by the dengue virus.[1] Symptoms typically begin 3 to 14 days after infection.[2] These may include a high feverheadachevomitingmuscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin itching and skin rash.[1][2] Recovery generally takes two to seven days.[1] In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into a more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever, resulting in bleedinglow levels of blood platelets and blood plasma leakage, or into dengue shock syndrome, where dangerously low blood pressure occurs.[1][2]

DJ, since Dengue is spread by mosquitos there could be infected mosquitos on such planes...IF !!!! it is Dengue hemorrhagic fever they soon may find out based on the findings in the patient...

It underlines the risk of long distance travel-flying diseases all over the world...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 10 2024 at 12:23pm

[url]https://www.blick.ch/ausland/mann-stirbt-auf-bangkok-flug-schweizer-ehepaar-musste-das-drama-mitansehen-der-absolute-horror-alle-haben-geschrien-id19417734.html[/url] or https://www.blick.ch/ausland/mann-stirbt-auf-bangkok-flug-schweizer-ehepaar-musste-das-drama-mitansehen-der-absolute-horror-alle-haben-geschrien-id19417734.html ;

Man dies on Bangkok flight – Swiss couple had to watch the drama
“The absolute horror, everyone screamed”

There was drama on a Lufthansa flight from Bangkok to Munich on Thursday evening.
Published: February 9, 2024 at 1:35 p.m
|
Updated: February 9, 2024 at 4:28 p.m




-

Lufthansa's Airbus A380 is scheduled to take off from Bangkok to Munich promptly at 11:40 p.m. on Thursday. Martin Missfelder (53) and his wife Karin (55) from Birmensdorf ZH are on flight LH773. She is a nursing specialist at the University Hospital in Zurich.


And when she got in, she immediately noticed the poor health of a 63-year-old fellow passenger in the row in front of her, as she tells Blick. “He had cold sweats, was breathing much too quickly, and was already apathetic.”

Captain and doctor check man's condition

He was German and the woman was Filipina. She said that they had to run to the plane very quickly and that that was why he wasn't feeling so well. Karin Missfelder says: “A flight attendant then reacted and asked him if he was okay, she was very worried.” But they still wanted to let him fly.


Karin Missfelder intervenes, goes to a flight attendant and says that a doctor needs to take a look at the man. The captain is now called, who speaks briefly to the man and then reacts. "He then called for a doctor over the loudspeaker - and a young, around 30-year-old man from Poland with poor English looked at the German."


Condition worsens dramatically


But he only asked briefly how he was feeling, felt his pulse and then gave the OK. Martin Missfelder says: “They then gave him a little chamomile tea, but he already spit blood into the bag that his wife held out to him.”

You could still have reacted. But the plane takes off. And the man's condition worsens dramatically. He keeps spitting into the bag - and finally a gush of blood comes out of his mouth and nose. “It was absolute horror, everyone was screaming,” says Missfelder. The man lost liters of blood. The walls were also full.

“It was dead quiet on board”

The flight attendants immediately began resuscitation. “Unfortunately a bit amateurish,” as Karin Missfelder says. “But they lasted about half an hour,” she says. Although it was already clear that the man was no longer alive. “It was dead quiet on board.”

The man is carried into the galley and the plane has to fly back to Bangkok. The captain announced over the loudspeaker that the man had unfortunately died.

Sheer chaos at the airport

What particularly outraged the couple: There was sheer chaos at the airport. Martin Missfelder says: “Nobody looked after us, we waited two hours. There was no care team there, nobody. We all had to go to a counter, where we received a 10-franc voucher.” Eventually they were rebooked via Hong Kong. But the worst thing was that the wife of the deceased passenger had to go through customs alone. “She stood there all alone and apathetic and had to endure all the formalities.”


Missfelder is outraged: "The fact that Lufthansa has no measures in his case, that no one cares about around 30 traumatized passengers around, is unacceptable." He expects an apology from the airline - including to the passenger's wife.


Lufthansa confirms death


Karin Missfelder blames herself: “The man looked so bad, I don’t understand why the captain took off. I should have intervened, but I saw that a doctor was looking after him, so I didn't want to get involved."

The couple has an 18-hour flight ahead of them. “We’re trying to process it somehow now,” says Martin Missfelder.

Lufthansa confirms the death upon request from Blick. In principle, “no further details” can be communicated in such cases.

DJ, So the plane returned to Bangkok, the 63 y/o German man was already in a bad shape before take-of...(for information purpose google translated in English) 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 10 2024 at 9:55pm

DJ, Based on the above "Blick"-story;

-Both Bangkok Airport and Lufthansa failed to do a healthcheck on a serious ill man

-Lufthansa endangered other patients by allowing a serious ill man in the plane

-Lufthansa failed to go for the medical care needed before take-of

-Lufthansa did NOT isolate the very ill patient during flight

-Lufthansa did NOT provide good enough care after returning to Bangkok

-Lufthansa and Thailand do NOT provide (as far as I know) enough info on the incident

I wonder why this story would not become a legal case ? Both the airport and transporter failed to do even a basic medical examination on a very ill man. 

What if the man was spreading a highly infectious disease ? 

It may be a good example of how international travel is flying diseases over the globe...every hour-every day !!!

This is how pandemics start !!!

[url]https://www.thailandmedical.news/news/thailand-medical-experts-warn-of-a-dengue-crisis-as-almost-8200-cases-and-13-deaths-reported-in-january-2024[/url] or https://www.thailandmedical.news/news/thailand-medical-experts-warn-of-a-dengue-crisis-as-almost-8200-cases-and-13-deaths-reported-in-january-2024 may be very likely related...Dengue is spread by mosquitos...in a colder climate those mosquitos may not survive...(however other mosquitos may also pick up the virus from an infected person. Dengue is a global problem !!!) 

The TMN has a link to [url]https://scandasia.com/danish-actor-hospitalized-with-dengue-fever-in-thailand/[/url] or https://scandasia.com/danish-actor-hospitalized-with-dengue-fever-in-thailand/ ;

Danish actors Anna Stokholm and Simon Stenspil, whom are vacationing in Thailand with their son, has been facing health challenges in the Southeast Asian country. After recovering from the flu, Simon Stenspil was diagnosed with dengue fever. He is currently hospitalized for observation. Dengue fever, common in tropical areas, can lead to severe complications.

Danish news outlet B.T. is presently seeking further comments from the couple.

Source: BT

DJ, A very main reason why we are still in the CoViD/corona pandemic is a total lack of any basic medical testing in international flights...When you enter some countries they may look at temperature or ask questions...but "economy first" often translates to ignoring public health risks...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote roni3470 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 12 2024 at 7:42am

I read somewhere that it was a blood vessel explosion so to speak.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 12 2024 at 8:10am

roni 3470...I did read about dengue-problems in Thailand...symptoms of the passenger did not exclude that...But it may have been something completely different indeed...

Still it is "bizarre" to have a very ill passenger-without any medical checks-on a flight lasting several hours...

Lufthansa has something to explain...I do not know if they did further react to this story...or "for privacy reasons" did fail to explain what happened...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote roni3470 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 12 2024 at 11:54am

I agree and the whole thing is just crazy...i wonder if we will ever even find out what happened because they hide everything!  I feel like the way government and media lie to us, we may find out things too late. I used to love when albert was on here because he somehow found out about things way before the average public did!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 12 2024 at 10:53pm

I mentioned this to a medically trained friend of mine yesterday and she said it sounded like a pulmonary embolism. She said all that blood had to have come from his lungs.

Those who got it wrong, for whatever reason, may feel defensive and retrench into a position that doesn’t accord with the facts.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 13 2024 at 12:01am

[url]https://www.pennmedicine.org/for-patients-and-visitors/patient-information/conditions-treated-a-to-z/pulmonary-embolus[/url] or https://www.pennmedicine.org/for-patients-and-visitors/patient-information/conditions-treated-a-to-z/pulmonary-embolus ;

What Is Pulmonary Embolism (Pulmonary Embolus)?

A pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in your pulmonary arteries, the blood vessels that send blood to your lungs. It usually happens when a blood clot in the deep veins in your leg breaks off and travels to your lungs.

A blood clot that travels to another part of your body is called an embolus. When an embolus blocks a blood vessel it's called an embolism. When a pulmonary embolus blocks blood flow to your lungs, it's called a pulmonary embolism.

Pulmonary Embolism Causes

The most common cause of a pulmonary embolism is a the breaking off of a blood clot in your leg's deep veins, known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Other, rare causes of a pulmonary embolism include:

  • Air bubbles
  • DVT in the upper body
  • Fat embolus, usually from a severely broken bone
  • Tumors

You are more likely to develop blood clots if you have risk factors such as:

  • Cancer
  • Family history of blood clots or clotting disorders
  • Heart disease
  • Health history of blood clots or clotting disorders
  • Long-term use of birth control pills or estrogen therapy

A pulmonary embolism is also more likely to develop after:

  • Childbirth
  • Heart attack or stroke
  • Long plane or car rides
  • Long-term bedrest
  • Severe injuries, burns or fractures
  • Surgery

Pulmonary Embolism Symptoms

You may not have any symptoms of a pulmonary embolism, depending on the size of the clot and your overall health. As blood flow becomes more and more blocked, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Coughing, including a cough that produces bloody mucus
  • Dizziness
  • Heart palpitations, sensations of your heart racing or pounding
  • Leg pain or swelling
  • Sharp and sudden chest pain
  • Shortness of breath that worsens with exertion

Pulmonary Embolism Complications

A pulmonary embolism can be life-threatening without treatment. It can cause several complications, including:

Rarely, people have multiple small pulmonary emboli that develop over time. This is called chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).

Diagnosing a Pulmonary Embolism

To diagnose a pulmonary embolism, your doctor does a physical exam, asks about your symptoms and orders one or more tests such as:

  • Blood tests to check if you have an increased risk of blood clotting
  • Chest X-rays to take pictures of your heart and lungs
  • CT pulmonary angiography, using X-rays and specialized computers to create cross-sectional, 3D images of your lungs and pulmonary arteries
  • Doppler ultrasound, using sound waves to look for deep vein thrombosis in your legs
  • Echocardiogram to view your heart's structures and blood vessels
  • Lab tests, such as pulse oximetry to measure oxygen levels in your blood or arterial blood gas tests to measure the balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide
  • Pulmonary angiogram, using a small, hollow tube (catheter) and a contrast dye to see how blood flows through the pulmonary arteries
  • Ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scan, injecting a tracer into your veins to track blood flow and compare it with air flow to check for pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary Embolism Treatment at Penn Medicine

Rapid treatment for pulmonary embolism is critical for good outcomes. At Penn Medicine, the Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT) provides leading-edge, team-based care for acute (sudden) or chronic (long-lasting) pulmonary embolisms. We were one the of the first PERTs in the country and are among the top 10 most advanced centers in the nation in pulmonary embolism treatment.

We offer a full range of innovative treatments, including investigational therapies. Your treatment may include:

  • Medications: Your doctor may prescribe drugs to dissolve the blood clot (thrombolytics) or blood thinners (anticoagulants).
  • Clot removal: A physician inserts a catheter through a blood vessel and guides it to your pulmonary arteries. They use special devices inserted through the catheter to break up the clot or pull it out of the artery. Penn specialists use the full range of approved clot removal devices, so you have access to advanced, targeted treatment.
  • Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement: We use a catheter to position a filter in your inferior vena cava, the main vein that carries blood from your legs to your heart. An IVC filter can help to catch emboli and prevent them from traveling to your heart or lungs.
  • Balloon pulmonary angioplasty: We insert a catheter through a blood vessel in your groin and guide it to the pulmonary arteries. Once in position, we inflate a balloon in the blocked artery to open the blockage and restore blood flow. Often, we treat multiple small pulmonary emboli. This treatment is typically used for people with CTEPH.

DJ...that would NOT make it a hemorrhagic fever...or even dengue...

But we may never know. The 63 y/o German died. There reasons of his death could/shoeld (?) be seen as private...

However the circumstances -no medical checks when the man had sympthoms of a very serious healthproblem- deserve "a lot of discussion"...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 13 2024 at 11:32am

Well we will know if a plane full of tourists suddenly come down with hemorraghic fever!

Those who got it wrong, for whatever reason, may feel defensive and retrench into a position that doesn’t accord with the facts.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 13 2024 at 11:33pm

KiwiMum....say incubation time would be a week...only passengers close to the infected person would catch the virus...in that scenario I am afraid healthcare may NOT link the illness to the flight..

Very likely passengers came from lots of countries. Flight was from Bangkok to Munich-Bavaria-Germany but the news was from a Swiss magazine...Very likely some passengers did take connecting flights...

So...maybe the virus would have been able somehow (droplets on clothing ???) spread to more people on a connecting flight...(maybe older, more vulnerable, passengers...)

Again...I follow also stories on H5N1...it looks like lots of human ceses may be missed because people did NOT show symptoms while they had the virus...

An old 2006 story on "mild" H5N2 infections in Japan [url]https://www.poultryworld.net/home/japanese-poultry-workers-probably-infected-with-mild-bird-flu/[/url] or https://www.poultryworld.net/home/japanese-poultry-workers-probably-infected-with-mild-bird-flu/ ;

Japan’s Health Ministry reported that 93 poultry farm workers may have been exposed to a mild form of the bird flu virus last year.


The ministry had said in a preliminary report in January that 77 people were exposed to and possibly infected with the H5N2 strain, which was not previously known to infect humans. It is milder than the virulent H5N1 strain that has recently spread from Asia to Europe.

DJ Very likely healthy persons with good immunity...

[url]https://www.theguardian.com/world/2023/may/16/two-poultry-workers-test-positive-for-bird-flu-in-england[/url] or https://www.theguardian.com/world/2023/may/16/two-poultry-workers-test-positive-for-bird-flu-in-england ;

Two poultry workers have tested positive for bird flu after coming into contact with infected birds on the same farm in England, according to the UK Health Security Agency.

The cases were picked up through a screening programme for people who have come into close contact with the virus, though neither individual suffered symptoms and both have since tested negative.

DJ...my view is that it may be very easy to MISS a disease...

-the virus may be detectable only a short time

-the infection my give NO symptoms

-we are hardly testing...

So...spread of a disease may be very hard to follow...contact-tracing needs a lot of in time testing...

Some people can carry a virus-infect (lots of) others without getting any symptomes themselves...

Again...interesting (detective) story...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A-I Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 19 2024 at 8:36am

Originally posted by KiwiMum KiwiMum wrote:

I mentioned this to a medically trained friend of mine yesterday and she said it sounded like a pulmonary embolism. She said all that blood had to have come from his lungs.

^^^^^BINGO^^^^^^

"Facts don't care about your feelings" I'M A UNVAXXED DEVIL so kiss my rebel ass.
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