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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic since 2005; Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic Discussion Forum.

Food Issues and Shortages

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FluMom View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Food Issues and Shortages
    Posted: April 06 2020 at 10:33am

Here is the thread people asked for please post food problems here.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cindylouflu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2020 at 11:44am

Meat, dairy, eggs and frozen foods hit or miss.  Limits imposed for some items.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2020 at 1:28pm

I'm currently following reports of a global wheat shortage. We're certainly running low on flour here in NZ as the majority of the flour we eat comes from Australia. I think this is something to watch.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2020 at 1:38pm

I am def. looking at and preparing to purchase an upright freezer. I have an outside shed with electric to place it in (no garage in this condo). Used to have a chest freezer out there, sold it to a friend for $50 (it was old) after my son moved out, figured I didn't need it or the electric bill for it anymore...sigh...this time around I am going for the frost free upright and am going to fill that thing up. 

'A man who does not think and plan long ahead will find trouble right at his door.'
--Confucius

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ME163 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2020 at 8:38pm

the key ro food shortages is going to be southern Africa and corn . if they have  a good crop, wheat and corn surpluses can be used in feed crops.  If there is a famine in southern africa, all bets are off.   

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Thorne! Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2020 at 9:55pm

My sister reports milk, butter and egg shortages in Maine. Either none, or two per customer.

On the other hand, our five goat does have all recently birthed, and our chickens are laying 20-22 eggs per day.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Flubergasted Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2020 at 5:29am

While everyone is seeing limitations on things like milk at the stores, there technically is no shortage.  The problem is that people are not eating in restaurants anymore.  A lot of our food is prepared for commercial use, not to be sold in grocery stores. 

 Think about how many people routinely eat in restaurants, who are now eating at home.  Dairy farmers across the US are actually having to dump milk because of distribution problems.  Children at schools are no longer getting the little cartons of milk for breakfast and lunch.  Trendy coffee houses no longer use the cream from their farm to table business models.  The little butter bubble packs used in restaurants are not packaged for sale at the grocery store.  

Since distributors were unprepared for the shift, they have not yet worked out how to get these products into stores.  Thus, a lot of food is going to waste.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2020 at 7:11am

Originally posted by FluMom FluMom wrote:

Here is the thread people asked for please post food problems here.

Thanks FluMom - hopefully this thread is another opportunity to help the readers of the forum get ready for 'potential pandemic'...of starvation!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2020 at 7:19am

Originally posted by ME163 ME163 wrote:

the key ro food shortages is going to be southern Africa and corn . if they have  a good crop, wheat and corn surpluses can be used in feed crops.  If there is a famine in southern africa, all bets are off.   

Top 3 corn producers in the world are USA, China, and Brazil.    Right now 2019 was 'the year of no harvest' in large tracts of the USA (you can watch farmers finishing harvesting last years crop this spring on youTube), Brazil had a terrible year.  My feed prices went up 30-40% (depending on product) last fall as so many crops failed in so many states, provinces and other countries we import from.  We know that 'all bets are off' as to what's happening in China and if they are warning their citizens to have 3-6 months of rice, flour etc in their homes … 

I wouldn't count on much of anything coming out of Africa (East) due to the locusts... horrifying to my 'farming' eyes...  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4KEUoeZ0fU



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EdwinSm, Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2020 at 7:58am

The latest FAO report has world food prices falling, and on their page of "cereal supply and demand" they say

Originally posted by "FAO" "FAO" wrote:

Near-record wheat production expected in 2020; ample supplies to help shield food markets from turmoil of coronavirus storm 

Link to FAO


Just hoping that supply lines hold up, and the harvest can get to where it is needed.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2020 at 8:05am

Flubergasted - Personally, I'm concerned about both the short term food shortages being caused by SARS2, but even more so about the long term shortages; 

a) how major disruptions to supply chain like warehouses full of eggs being garbaged because they can't get cartons to pack them into to ship/sell in UK - this is a shorter (hopefully) term problem but is a good example of just how delicate our system is... https://consciousnessofsheep.co.uk/2020/03/26/liebigs-law-writ-large/

b) as countries try to protect their own people and nationalism kicks in hard - more and more countries will limit or stop exports. One example (there are dozens!) China grows 40% of worlds rice, they are now withholding for own use, not to mention the tons/tonnes they import from other countries (including US!).

c) Meat is under 'attack' between animal activists, African Swine Flu (took out 2/3 of pigs in China last year - over 1/3 of ENTIRE worlds pigs died in 2019!), all major US meat plants are being bought out by China and products will go to them first, shipping issues for animal feed are causing problems in many places, lack of availability/rising feed costs, droughts/flooding/fires... the list is never ending and I face it in various ways day to day here on farm so realize how real it is.

d) labour issues - right now Canada & the USA are both suffering huge labour issues for farming... https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/canada-to-allow-seasonal-foreign-workers-but-they-must-self-isolate-minister-says/ar-BB12caLZ?ocid=spartanntp&fbclid=IwAR2hK6LbriR6JRFVLaXYr_pkQeRf7PejllYgZaHKdVmAg8f24ZK3PKziPEY  

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-farmworkers-idUSKBN21O179?fbclid=IwAR2QxeM4qKfrvCvh3a6UzfuWfslp2CFm_4ns7zYVtTD_z7UVjFyR1mVPfkY

These are just a few of the issues we are facing - they are all covered much better by the 

Ice Age Farmer channel 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2nUB_TFL0U&t=501s

and Yanasa Ama Ventures

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkL8WQozfOE

Everyone - please just watch with an open mind - we are potentially facing a much larger issue then Covid-19



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote WitchMisspelled Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2020 at 11:54am

I think a) is a short term problem.  At least for American export of eggs.

I don't think b) is a problem at all in that the U.S. exports more rice to China than it imports from China. Granted, if all imports of Chinese rice were cut, America would be see a rise of what we consider gourmet rice like Basmati, Jasmine, or Oryza sativa (sticky) rice.

c) isn't a problem at all in that this impacts China, not the U.S. The trade war is the reason pork has remained relatively cheap in the U.S. And we don't have the swine flu problem. Further even with the Smithfield acquisition, China only "owns" 1 in 4 pigs in the U.S. But that doesn't mean they can import all that Smithfield produces nor can they order an American based company to export all produced here to there. Feed was an issue for other meat products last year, but only because we had to import more. Fingers crossed feed crops do as well as projected this year.

d) is an issue for the U.S. Cheap immigrant labor or the lack of it is to blame for American grown hand picked produce being so expensive. If it continues, hand picked American produce will skyrocket further. With trade settled between the U.S. and Central and South America, I don't think much will change there. Except that produce will likely rise a bit because of competition with China. But maybe not considering Russia has stepped up their exports with China.

I've said this before and I don't think people understand what I mean, but the U.S. is the major food exporter of the world. We will never be out of food. We just won't have all the kinds of food our palates have become accustomed to and are easily obtainable in U.S. grocery stores.

Unless of course we have an ice age.  But I'm not convinced that will happen in our lifetimes.  And even then, our growing zones will change.  But I just don't see a time where the U.S. would be unable to produce our own food.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mwbab Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 08 2020 at 7:32am

hello flumom

I have a question you had posted you had dried eggs that were 12 years old and they were not good. I have a can about the same age I think 13 years.  How do I know if they are good Same with the can dry  milk? Can I look at them and know or is this based on the age of the cans?

For any long term storage foods how do we know if they are still safe to eat?

Thanks so much for any info

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 08 2020 at 9:34am

Well first being the person I am I cooked some and they were not yellow they were a light brown.  Tasted them and they had no flavor but they looked off.  So I contacted Honeyville and they told me they were too old.  Usually for eggs 7 years at the most.  So I am throwing them out.  I have milk also that is 12 yrs old and I am getting rid of it too.  5 years for milk so if it is older than that I would not think it is good.  I am going through all of my eggs and milk.  I think rice and beans and other items will be fine.  Eggs and milk are more likely to go "bad"  than other items.  If you have questions I would go to the place you purchased them from and ask like I did.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pheasant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 09 2020 at 1:51am

New York  (CNN Business)Across the country, major meat processors are starting to shut down plants as employees are getting infected by coronavirus.  

Tyson (TSN), one of the world's largest meat processors, suspended operations at its Columbus Junction, Iowa, pork plant this week after more than two dozen workers contracted Covid-19 there. Tyson said it would divert livestock that was headed to Columbus Junction to other pork plants in the region to minimize the impact on its production.

JBS USA, another major meat processor, has stopped operations at its beef plant in Souderton, Pennsylvania with plans to reopen April 16, after two weeks. The company decided to close the facility after several members of the plant's management team stopped going to work because they were experiencing flu-like symptoms, a company representative explained, adding that all other JBS USA's plants are still open. Cargill has also paused operations at its protein plant in Hazleton, Pennsylvania, where 900 people typically work

"This will allow us to minimize the impact of COVID-19  and continue [to] follow health department guidelines," said Jon Nash, North America lead for Cargill Protein, in a statement to CNN Business. 


Consumers are unlikely to see any shortages because of production disturbances. But the closures are devastating for some meat producers, which have remained open during the pandemic. Food suppliers are essential businesses.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/08/business/meat-plant-closures-coronavirus/index.html

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 09 2020 at 7:51am

As this thread is about continued food supply, chain of supply etc I thought I'll post this here.

I once saw a 'manual' from the early 1900's re: how to maximize production from your chickens - max eggs and chicks (reared successfully!) but it was 'out of print' and I never did find it.  Was years ago and can't remember the name now, but if any of you who follow the free books, manuals, etc sites see something like this - can you please post it or private message a link?  

It was written well before the days of power/incubators and I'm truly hoping that by now, someone has made a pdf of it and has it online.  Between chores, being sick (waiting for test results now) and spring thaw/yard flooding - I'm maxed!  Shouldn't be on here as long as I am, but get pooped out so bad - need to sit... if anyone feels like searching and has spare time - have at 'er!  Don't know if/when I ever will.

I've got various heritage breeds of poultry and they tend to be good layers/brooders (a survival trait of the old breeds) but often babies don't make it in a community setting so would like to see how they used to set them up so they were safe.  I don't want to take over the pandemic forum with food stuffs but I simply feel it's time that the 'old' knowledge makes a comeback to try to ensure food security for future for all - so maybe as people see articles on info like this (whether it be poultry or pigs or garden) a link could be posted on this thread? 

JMO - There is a very real risk that the next pandemic is starvation, so prepping for that is critical too.  Thanks all!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penham Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 09 2020 at 11:06pm

I am doing my first grocery pick up tomorrow. Where you order and pay online and pick up at the store. They bring it out to your vehicle you don't have to get out. We are taking the truck so we will just have them put in the back. I really wanted to test it out and there was a few things I was wanting since this looks like it's going to last awhile. Anyway they still had no toilet paper.  I keep checking with Amazon and they have no toilet paper. Not that I need it yet,  I'm just kind of checking things out for when I do need it.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kaye kaye Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 10 2020 at 12:00am

Originally posted by Penham Penham wrote:

I am doing my first grocery pick up tomorrow. Where you order and pay online and pick up at the store. They bring it out to your vehicle you don't have to get out. We are taking the truck so we will just have them put in the back. I really wanted to test it out and there was a few things I was wanting since this looks like it's going to last awhile. Anyway they still had no toilet paper.  I keep checking with Amazon and they have no toilet paper. Not that I need it yet,  I'm just kind of checking things out for when I do need it.

We have toilet paper at Krogers, Meijers, and dollar store around these parts.  I think toilet paper is short some places because more people are staying home using instead of using it at work.  The different demand should adjust soon for everyone I would think.

keep the joy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penham Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 10 2020 at 10:19am

Hopefully, only essential workers are working here, almost everything is closed. Yes, most people are at home. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cindylouflu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 10 2020 at 7:13pm

Try TotalRestroom.com for TP.  Seems they are sold out of regular brand rolls, looks like industrial size rolls available.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CST Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 10 2020 at 7:19pm

I am essential so working.  Hope all are well.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 11 2020 at 10:41pm

I hope to have a good garden this year!!  Have to get through the cold weather in the next week.  I am growing as much as I can.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 12 2020 at 7:29am

Originally posted by FluMom FluMom wrote:

I hope to have a good garden this year!!  Have to get through the cold weather in the next week.  I am growing as much as I can.  

We are having a colder then usual spring here - still tons of snow around, snow (was I haven't looked in last week+) forecast for end of month!  Usually Mothers Day weekend here is the 'all out' greenhouse frenzy and get everything into ground - worst danger of hard frosts is past and ground warm enough.  Since moving back closer to family, it's become tradition to take mom around to different greenhouses on Moms day... not looking good to be able to do that this May - she's 84 and we won't take the chance.  One of the few days I really look forward to in a year - a day away from chores with time with mom, all the lovely new plants and flowers - she had a greenhouse for years when I was a kid so is a wealth of knowledge, I love learning about the plants...  missing that day will probably be 'the worst' day of the 'no travel stuff' for me.

Anyway - thinking mid May plant out here?  So needless to say - short season veggies (and hopefully get the flowers in for pollinators I'd planned on) mostly concentrating on 'food' this year, not many pretties lol.  Trying to figure out a hoop house right now so I can get a better head start...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pheasant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 2:30am

This represents 4-5% of US pork output, and this is in addition to Cargill and JB beef plant closures.


Top pork producer shutting SD plant indefinitely amid pandemic

A top pork producer in the country is shutting down its South Dakota plant indefinitely because of the pandemic, the company announced Sunday.

Smithfield Foods is shutting down its Sioux Falls, S.D. facility, one of the largest pork processing facilities in the country, “until further notice.” The plant processes four to five percent of pork in the U.S., amounting to about 130 million servings per week. 

“Smithfield will resume operations in Sioux Falls once further direction is received from local, state and federal officials,” the company said in a press release. 


Smithfield Food announced it would compensate its 3,700 employees from the plant for two weeks, and “hopes to keep them from joining the ranks of the tens of millions of unemployed Americans across the country.” 

Smithfield President and CEO Kenneth M. Sullivan said in a statement that the closure of this and other protein plants is “pushing our country perilously close to the edge in terms of our meat supply.”

It is impossible to keep our grocery stores stocked if our plants are not running,” he said. “These facility closures will also have severe, perhaps disastrous, repercussions for many in the supply chain, first and foremost our nation’s livestock farmers."

More than 550 family farmers give animals to the closing plant, according to the press release. 

Sullivan added that “numerous” agriculture and food plants have had employees who tested positive with COVID-19.

“We have continued to run our facilities for one reason: to sustain our nation’s food supply during this pandemic,” he said. “We believe it is our obligation to help feed the country, now more than ever. We have a stark choice as a nation: we are either going to produce food or not, even in the face of COVID-19.”


It’s unclear whether the closure has to do with an employee infection. But the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has maintained that there is no evidence that the virus can spread through food or food packaging. 

The company had initially planned to shut down for just three days, but Gov. Kristi Noem (R) requested it be extended to at least 14 days, she said in a tweet.

https://thehill.com/policy/finance/agriculture/492427-top-pork-producer-shutting-sd-plant-indefinitely-amid-pandemic



Several workers in essential industries, including the meat-packing industry, have staged protests about the dangers of working in close proximity to other employees during the pandemic.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pheasant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 2:37am

It's important to understand that when meat processors shut down, the farms that supply them get severely bottle necked, both in feed, bills, and inventory replacement (bringing in new piglets) for the next batch.

aside from the financial issues, one must understand the feed supply to keep the animals that cant go to market gets stretched as well, those animals cannot sit in pens indefinably.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote EdwinSm, Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 3:08am

I think we are seeing with the pork issue one of the problems of such a large scale concentration in any industry.  It is fine while it works and it is cheaper (which customers want), but if something goes wrong (as it has with the coronavirus) then there are big problems.


In the years ahead, as consumers, we need to ask if we want the same sort of cheapness of goods we buy, or are we willing to pay some more to have a more diverse but secure food supply chain.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 9:12am

Originally posted by EdwinSm, EdwinSm, wrote:

I think we are seeing with the pork issue one of the problems of such a large scale concentration in any industry.  It is fine while it works and it is cheaper (which customers want), but if something goes wrong (as it has with the coronavirus) then there are big problems.

In the years ahead, as consumers, we need to ask if we want the same sort of cheapness of goods we buy, or are we willing to pay some more to have a more diverse but secure food supply chain.

I saw a post on FB asking "if there was one thing you wanted to come out of this pandemic - what would it be?", some said closer families, revivals, learning how to balance work/life etc.  I know what my first one would be but this ^^^^ would be #2!!! 

IF people could only understand how bad intensive farming is...for the planet, for the animals, for us - maybe a cheaper piece of meat wouldn't be so important!   I've seen what happens when 'something' goes wrong and it is horrific for the animals...a broiler barn with the fans stopped for a few hours - thousands upon thousands dead... this is NOT cool with me.  

I am a farmer!

I believe (have since being a little kid) that the farmers are the 'keepers of the land' and of Gods beautiful creations of birds & animals.  

I do not feel corporations are farmers - they are financial managers/asset managers - everything is about the bottom line.  

My farm will never make huge dollars - but I will die knowing that I left the soil on my property better then I found it and that my stock had good lives, dust bathing/sleeping in the sun, mud to puddle and wallow in, injuries or illnesses followed by appropriate treatment and well loved... I can die knowing 'I did good' - poor financially, but rich in so many other ways.

JMO - This planets humans have some VERY hard times coming their way, not sure that 'bigger brains and opposable thumbs' will save as many as we like to think...and I personally have no interest in surviving on cockroach milk!

If it's to be - it's up to me!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote hoosiermom22 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 9:20am

Newbie 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 Living in Indiana I see both versions of farming. Also noted unprocessed milk being dumped on the ground when professors couldn’t accept more last week. Sad for so many in food lines on the news.



“pushing our country perilously close to the edge in terms of our meat supply.”

“It is impossible to keep our grocery stores stocked if our plants are not running,” 

We have to hope that grain and other farming doesn’t follow. Living in a more urban area, not sure how self sustainable I could get in a hurry. Just when I am fatigued from prepping, I see this and want to add more for the future.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 3:34pm

We will have some food shortages...just going to happen!

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If it's to be - it's up to me!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 6:56pm

Island states and nations could get bad fast.  They have to get most of their food shipped in.  When in Hawaii I though no way would I live on an island depending on ships to bring in supplies and food!!!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Penham Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2020 at 8:15pm

I was reading an article today that was saying there was 10 beef and chicken plants closed in the US and Canada that were closed because of workers being sick and not being able to come to work. This does not include the Smithfield pork plant. I definitely see food shortages in the near future.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pheasant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 14 2020 at 5:01am

Just an update:

Central Florida here and I have not been able to get frozen or fresh beef or chicken for 2 weeks now...always sold out.....and that's with a 2 lb limit.

Local slaughter house where i bring my pig/ steers to has a retail store and is selling ground beef 80/20 for $8.90 a pound....(says its organic)...with no "regular" beef available.

The only meat (besides the little canned meat that's available) is processed breaded stuff.....like chicken patties, tenders etc:

The only thing we have to fear, is fear itself......FDR
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 14 2020 at 8:20am

And please realize that it's not 'just meat/milk/eggs' that are being impacted - although the war on meat proteins is ramping up in a huge way...

Thousands of tons on onions & squash have been wasted in last 2 weeks. I just heard from a gf that has friends/family in Manitoba that work in potato industry that all their seed potatoes are rotting waiting to go in the ground (too cold/wet still I'm guessing if like here) so that will be a late/small harvest in a few months.  

You must secure as much of your own food supply as you can!  If living in city - get a couple fluorescent grow bulbs and plant potatoes, carrots etc in 5gallon pails or large pots, get lettuce growing in flats for microgreens/greens etc. - I realize space is very limited (been there done that!) but every little bit will help you down the road.  And buy mung beans, alfalfa, radish etc - sprouting seeds - I'm not a huge fan of sprouts but they are fast, take very little room (a few jars on counter for continual crop) and are highly nutritious.   I really think this is going to be a long term problem - not just a few months of impairment to supply chain etc from C19. If farmers are forced to get rid of breeding stock/downsize and/or lose their shirts financially trying to hang onto stock through this - it will take time to rebuild flock/herd numbers!  Time... months to years depending on species! 

If it's to be - it's up to me!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Rollingsalmon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 14 2020 at 10:36am

The longer this goes on, the worse the food situation is going to get. There are 1000s of things which haven't been thought of in the supply chains we have counted on forever. This forum isn't being used at anywhere close to its potential. When REAL shortages or outages in grocery stores hit, so will fierce social unrest. 

I'd like to encourage those of us here to double down on information. If you come across reliable information RE: food, PLEASE post here. The more we know, the better we can get ahead of it.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 14 2020 at 11:47am

Anyone, anywhere can do this...If I can, you can. It was easy, peasy and yes I grew three kinds of lettuce in mine through the winter.

'A man who does not think and plan long ahead will find trouble right at his door.'
--Confucius

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 14 2020 at 1:39pm

Five ways coronavirus is disrupting the food industry
1. Milk down the drain
This issue is not only being seen in the US, with dairy farmers in the UK asking for government help because of their own surplus problems. Peter Alvis, chair of the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers, says about five million litres per week are at risk.

2. Crops go to waste
The New York Times, which interviewed some US producers, cited an example of one chicken processor having to smash 750,000 unhatched eggs every single week. They also spoke to an onion farmer who was having to let most of his harvest decompose, unable to re-distribute his onions in high enough quanities and without the facilities to store them.

3. Not enough workers
There has also been a 'Feed the Nation' campaign launched in the UK to encourage domestic workers to plug any labor gaps to avoid food waste.

4. Changing our shopping habits
The pandemic has led to some changes in what we are trying to buy. For example, the UK has seen demand for flour soar in recent weeks as people stuck at home increasingly turn to home-baking.

According to new data, cited by BFMTV, French shoppers have increasingly been buying more organic food since coronavirus fears took hold of the country.

5. Stock is sitting unused
Take UK pub closures for example. Much of the industry's current supply of lager and ale could now go to waste under government rules which mean they could be closed for the foreseeable future.

Some beers have a best-before date of just weeks - which means thousands of unused barrels in pub basements could be undrinkable by the time the lockdown is lifted.
'Up to 50m pints' going to waste in empty pubs


..But it's not bad news for everyone
Some parts of the food industry are benefiting from our changing consumption habits.

US sales of orange juice, which had been on a gradual decline, are said to be up 38% on last year's figures.

The so-called "futures" price of orange juice has soared in recent weeks. "The Covid-19 outbreaks are hitting both the supply and demand for orange juice," Stephen Innes, chief global market strategist at broker AxiCorp said last month.

"The immune-boosting properties are the demand-side attraction while there are simply not enough tanker spaces, with airlines not flying, to bring the product to markets."

The demand is good news for orange growers, especially in Florida and Brazil - who supply big brands like Tropicana,

'A man who does not think and plan long ahead will find trouble right at his door.'
--Confucius

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2020 at 12:54pm

https://www.today.com/food/meat-factories-are-shutting-down-across-country-will-there-be-t178527


So should consumers be worried about an impending shortage of pork and other meats?


"Prior to March, a large percentage of pork products were produced and sold to restaurants," Julie Niederhoff, associate professor of Supply Chain Management at Syracuse University, told TODAY. "This left a fairly stocked pork supply chain where the the temporary closure of one plant isn't likely to impact consumers nearly as much as it impacts farmers."


Niederhoff is currently predicting a minor short term impact on the price and availability of pork. But that's only if the plant is closed for a few weeks. A longer closure could be detrimental if there's a domino effect throughout the company, she said.


"Nearly 60% of pork is processed in 15 plants all in close geographic proximity to this Smithfield plant," Niederhoff said. If COVID-19 forces more plants in the area to close, "consumers would definitely feel it."


Many farmers and industry workers are already feeling it. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, meat manufacturing beats out dairy, grains, beverages and produce to account for the largest sector of food and beverage manufacturing in the U.S. The industry is comprised of nearly 500,000 workers.

******MORE AT LINK*******

'A man who does not think and plan long ahead will find trouble right at his door.'
--Confucius

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2020 at 1:09pm

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/bibeau-says-canada-has-enough-food-but-covid-19-will-still-cause-challenges/ar-BB12FIxC?ocid=spartandhp


Canadians can expect less variety and higher prices (I think this is a huge understatement myself!)...


If it's to be - it's up to me!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2020 at 3:01pm

Well I broke down and ordered groceries on line and had delivered.  They had all the vegies...the zucchini were a little sad but everything else was fine.  Got some milk and will freeze one just in case things get scarce.  They did not get my sunflower kernels I got sunflower seeds in shells...Oh well.

I wiped down everything that could be wiped and washed all the veggies under running water.  Hope that will be good enough!

  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2020 at 3:30pm

Don't laugh FluMom, but soapy water is best.  You can rince them afterwards, if you can still smell/taste the soap then rince in vinegar.

The chemistry is a bit complex, but here goes:

Soap is a funny molecule.  It has a hydrophillic end and a hydrophobic end.  That means one end of a soap molecule sticks to fat and the other stricks to water - letting it disolve and taking the fat with it.

                               fat]=soap=[water                        all sticking together.

This virus is a single strand of DNA inside a 'lipid' envelope , basically a bubble of fat with the working bit inside.  The soap molecule literally rips it appart!  Without the fat layer (which holds the protein binding spikes the virus uses to invade cells) the virus is powerless.

Common or garden soap is its kryptonite.

                     

ERCD
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2020 at 4:46pm

Originally posted by FluMom FluMom wrote:

Well I broke down and ordered groceries on line and had delivered.  They had all the vegies...the zucchini were a little sad but everything else was fine.  Got some milk and will freeze one just in case things get scarce.  They did not get my sunflower kernels I got sunflower seeds in shells...Oh well.

I wiped down everything that could be wiped and washed all the veggies under running water.  Hope that will be good enough!

  

Wash the fruit and veg in soapy water. I've been running a sink full of soapy water, just tepid, and then washing each piece direct from the shops with a dishcloth, then putting them in the other sink and then rinsing them with cold water.  

You can't fix stupid.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Newbie1A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 15 2020 at 5:11pm

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/pandemic-could-affect-food-supplies-power-grids-telecommunications-says-government-document/ar-BB12FVrt?ocid=spartandhp

Ok, MSM seems to be waking up to what a 'worst case scenario' might look like, earlier today was the article on potential food shortages - this one warns about that, but also power grid, banking, & telecommunications failures... My tin-hat side wonders - is this pre-programing or warning for what's being planned?

At this point in time 2 million have tested positive (of 7.8 billion) so if my calculator figured it out right 0.000256 of the worlds population... (it doesn't like that many zeros!!!!) 

Here in Canada we broke the '1000 dead' marker today.  Yesterday I'd played with numbers as PM's public address said over 430,000 tests done - 26, 897 confirmed or assumptive - so 0.06255% of those tested.   Total deaths yest was 898 so, it's 0.03338 of positive cases and from gross population of Canada (36million) it's 0.0000249%  Annual flu is 0.01???  Will have to hold tight and see what numbers show in a month or so when deaths start to catch up - ie. lag is gone.  But as the numbers stand now... there is no way this type of response is warranted, like I said - will see how much more appropriate they seem a month from now.     

Either way - us humans are in for a rough ride for a long time.

If it's to be - it's up to me!
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