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military spending record high

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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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Joined: May 01 2013
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    Posted: April 24 2023 at 2:05am

[url]https://www.sipri.org/media/press-release/2023/world-military-expenditure-reaches-new-record-high-european-spending-surges[/url] or https://www.sipri.org/media/press-release/2023/world-military-expenditure-reaches-new-record-high-european-spending-surges ;

(Stockholm, 24 April 2023) Total global military expenditure increased by 3.7 per cent in real terms in 2022, to reach a new high of $2240 billion. Military expenditure in Europe saw its steepest year-on-year increase in at least 30 years. The three largest spenders in 2022—the United States, China and Russia—accounted for 56 per cent of the world total, according to new data on global military spending published today by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

Russia and Ukraine raise military spending as war rages on

Russian military spending grew by an estimated 9.2 per cent in 2022, to around $86.4 billion. This was equivalent to 4.1 per cent of Russia’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2022, up from 3.7 per cent of GDP in 2021.

Figures released by Russia in late 2022 show that spending on national defence, the largest component of Russian military expenditure, was already 34 per cent higher, in nominal terms, than in budgetary plans drawn up in 2021.

‘The difference between Russia’s budgetary plans and its actual military spending in 2022 suggests the invasion of Ukraine has cost Russia far more than it anticipated,’ said Dr Lucie Béraud-Sudreau, Director of SIPRI’s Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme.

Ukraine’s military spending reached $44.0 billion in 2022. At 640 per cent, this was the highest single-year increase in a country’s military expenditure ever recorded in SIPRI data. As a result of the increase and the war-related damage to Ukraine’s economy, the military burden (military spending as a share of GDP) shot up to 34 per cent of GDP in 2022, from 3.2 per cent in 2021.

US spending rises despite high inflation

The United States remains by far the world’s biggest military spender. US military spending reached $877 billion in 2022, which was 39 per cent of total global military spending and three times more than the amount spent by China, the world’s second largest spender. The 0.7 per cent real-terms increase in US spending in 2022 would have been even greater had it not been for the highest levels of inflation since 1981.

‘The increase in the USA’s military spending in 2022 was largely accounted for by the unprecedented level of financial military aid it provided to Ukraine,’ said Dr Nan Tian, SIPRI Senior Researcher. ‘Given the scale of US spending, even a minor increase in percentage terms has a significant impact on the level of global military expenditure.’

US financial military aid to Ukraine totalled $19.9 billion in 2022. Although this was the largest amount of military aid given by any country to a single beneficiary in any year since the cold war, it represented only 2.3 per cent of total US military spending. In 2022 the USA allocated $295 billion to military operations and maintenance, $264 billion to procurement and research and development, and $167 billion to military personnel.

China and Japan lead continued spending increase in Asia and Oceania

The combined military expenditure of countries in Asia and Oceania was $575 billion. This was 2.7 per cent more than in 2021 and 45 per cent more than in 2013, continuing an uninterrupted upward trend dating back to at least 1989.

China remained the world’s second largest military spender, allocating an estimated $292 billion in 2022. This was 4.2 per cent more than in 2021 and 63 per cent more than in 2013. China’s military expenditure has increased for 28 consecutive years.

Japan’s military spending increased by 5.9 per cent between 2021 and 2022, reaching $46.0 billion, or 1.1 per cent of GDP. This was the highest level of Japanese military spending since 1960. A new national security strategy published in 2022 sets out ambitious plans to increase Japan’s military capability over the coming decade in response to perceived growing threats from China, North Korea and Russia.

‘Japan is undergoing a profound shift in its military policy,’ said Xiao Liang, Researcher with SIPRI’s Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme. ‘The post-war restraints Japan imposed on its military spending and military capabilities seem to be loosening.’

Other notable developments

  • The real-terms increase in world military spending in 2022 was slowed by the effects of inflation, which in many countries soared to levels not seen for decades. In nominal terms (i.e. in current prices without adjusting for inflation), the global total increased by 6.5 per cent.
  • India’s military spending of $81.4 billion was the fourth highest in the world. It was 6.0 per cent more than in 2021.
  • In 2022 military spending by Saudi Arabia, the fifth biggest military spender, rose by 16 per cent to reach an estimated $75.0 billion, its first increase since 2018.
  • Nigeria’s military spending fell by 38 per cent to $3.1 billion, after a 56 per cent increase in spending in 2021.
  • Military spending by NATO members totalled $1232 billion in 2022, which was 0.9 per cent higher than in 2021.
  • The United Kingdom had the highest military spending in Central and Western Europe at $68.5 billion, of which an estimated $2.5 billion (3.6 per cent) was financial military aid to Ukraine.
  • In 2022 Türkiye’s military spending fell for the third year in a row, reaching $10.6 billion—a decrease of 26 per cent from 2021.
  • Ethiopia’s military spending rose by 88 per cent in 2022, to reach $1.0 billion. The increase coincided with a renewed government offensive against the Tigray People’s Liberation Front in the north of the country.

DJ, If you do not want war do not put ANY money in war industry....Sudan now is next in a refugee crisis-an outcome of "defense/war spending"....

[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket[/url] orhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket ;

War is a racket. It always has been. It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious. It is the only one international in scope. It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives. A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of the people. Only a small 'inside' group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many. Out of war a few people make huge fortunes.

DJ, weapon producers in history often did sell weapons to BOTH sides...telling one group the weapons the other had-so to increase profits...

This insanity has to end !

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
~Albert Einstein
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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2023 at 12:25am

[url]https://www.tehrantimes.com/news/483921/The-U-S-is-on-a-suicide-mission[/url] or https://www.tehrantimes.com/news/483921/The-U-S-is-on-a-suicide-mission 

By Martin Love

The U.S. is on a suicide mission…

April 23, 2023 - 21:57

The U.S. may be self-destructing in front of the world. This may be a good thing and no one will be blamed for it except Joe Biden and the Presidents and administrations that came before him after Ronald Reagan, each with their own miserable moves and policies after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991.

In 1992 American political theorist Francis Fukuyama published a book in which he argued that humanity had arrived at “the end of history”! That the fall of the Soviet Union had resulted in the end-point of the evolution of ideologies and that “Western liberal democracy” had become the final valid form of human government. This bold, even stupid, assertion could not have been more incorrect. There exist a thousand reasons why he was insanely wrong but the major reason why Fukuyama’s assertion was wrong was that ever since he wrote such the United States and its Western allies seized upon it not with any humility or care or consideration that humanity’s ideologies and cultures have always been variegated and suited to various diverse populations and cultures.

That, plus other truths such as the one that ever since the early 1990s the U.S. has been sliding far away from supporting both real liberalism and “democracy” whether at home or even overseas. The U.S. has long been solely about bullying hegemony.

Regime change actions by the U.S. have nothing to do with liberalism or democracy, but have everything to do with installing governments in foreign countries that do the bidding of Washington. Ukraine currently is the most striking and dangerous example of this. In Pakistan for example the U.S. fomented the marginalization of former popular leader Imran Khan because he refused to support U.S. policies around Ukraine. There are myriad other examples of this kind of action, some successful and some that have utterly failed like, for examples, in Venezuela or Syria and even now in Russia via the proxy war on Russia in Ukraine.

DJ...not only the US is "wasting" trillions on endless wars....

[url]https://southfront.org/how-much-natos-citizens-pay-for-natos-wars-infographics/[/url] or https://southfront.org/how-much-natos-citizens-pay-for-natos-wars-infographics/ 

The United States is indisputable leader in defense spending both in absolute figures and per capita. However, on the latter count the gap is not so dramatic with some Nordic countries demonstrating impressive propensity for making their citizens pay for war.

DJ, The US is spending 2,456$ per US citizen on the war-industry...the UK 1,073$ per UK citizen...Norway 1,685$ per Norwegian...but there are not that many Norwegians...

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
~Albert Einstein
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