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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic since 2005; Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic Discussion Forum.

Prepping June 2020

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Penham View Drop Down
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    Posted: June 04 2020 at 9:11pm

The time is flying by. I am still off work, since March 18th. I am loving my time off, trying to organize and get stuff done around the house. Our garden is growing but not that great, we have had several hail storms which have slowed the growth of our vegetables and knocked most of the fruits off the trees. We will be starting home improvement project next week, also due to the hail storms. I'm so glad my freezer is filled with meat. Ground beef is $8.79lb here. What is everyone else working on?

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My short term food pantry had a bit of a disaster.  Some shelf pegs dislodged and two shelves fell.  Fortunately I only lost one (glass) jar of turkey gravy.  But now I've got to pull out those two shelves and revamp things a bit.  

My first thought was to lighten the load and donate a bunch of stuff to my local food pantry, but a friend pointed out that maybe a better idea would be to put it into grocery bags in the corner of my bedroom until we're sure things aren't going to become a nightmare as new infections increase nationwide because of the protests, etc.

I am so not looking forward to today's chore!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 9:14am

Having had similar disasters in the past, I can really sympathise with that one.  Mine actually fell on me!  It was many years ago and I only had a couple of bruises, but it was very scary at the time.

ERCD
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hazelpad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 11:58am

Firstly I love this part of the forum.  Over the years I have learned so much from the posts here.  My bread now has been transformed from bricks to something close to edible.

 I had a 5L bottle of water come off a top shelf and fall about 1.5m straight onto my head yesterday.  Don't need the physics to work out how sore that was.  Still bit dazed today.  Probably explained my bad mood on forum yesterday. So while stores are piled high please secure (especially if you have evil cats like all mine are)

All this effort to SIP and it could have been death by my prep supplies.

Like Penham I am off work for a bit still, but will need to return to lab soon. 

My supplies are OK, but trying to work on a more holistic approach to SIP.  Discovering you have to be quite mentally prepared if you are used to living in a city, so I have learned it's not all about stocking food. 

I have 2 typical teenage city girls and I thought it would be a nightmare, but they have really adapted, my son not so much.  I gave him a search and rescue touch and told him the end was a secret cosh.  He is much happier though I think he could take the planes out the sky the touch is so bright. 

I am inspired by you all and am going to look into planting.  I have 2 greenhouses I have never used and spare ground that must be pretty fertile as when we came here there was originally a vegetable garden.  At moment over run by snails and frogs.

I think food wise I was well prepped thanks to you lot.  Not running done and now entering 3rd month in UK.  Top up with online food but limit this

My son is 10 and outgrown clothes and shoes so need to order some online. He is looking a bit like a skinny version of the incredible hulk with his trousers turning into shorts. That was one prep supply I forgot to consider.  He has no shoes so is riding his scooter about wearing Minecraft creeper slippers.

Glad to hear all your news.

Hz x


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 12:16pm

sharing a snippet from another place- Good food for thought


 Person had a telephone appointment with their primary care doctor yesterday. Had canceled several appointments (dental checkup and cleaning, getting  new hearing aids fitted, dermatologist followup visit) in mid March and had been reluctant to make new appts. BUT Dr told her she is very concerned about COVID cases increasing over the summer and about what will happen when flu season starts.  Encouraged  her to make appointments sooner rather than later. I


Her  takeaway: (1) make appointments ASAP, (2) be careful indefinitely--masks, social distancing, hand washing--and (3) plan to stay home as much as possible during flu season if the coronavirus is still active. Not a happy prospect

'When you feel as though you can't do something, the simple antidote is action: Begin doing it. Start the process, even if it's just a simple step, and don't stop at the beginning.'
Marcus B
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 3:25pm

Originally posted by Penham Penham wrote:

The time is flying by. I am still off work, since March 18th. I am loving my time off, trying to organize and get stuff done around the house. Our garden is growing but not that great, we have had several hail storms which have slowed the growth of our vegetables and knocked most of the fruits off the trees. We will be starting home improvement project next week, also due to the hail storms. I'm so glad my freezer is filled with meat. Ground beef is $8.79lb here. What is everyone else working on?

We had a hail storm here a few years ago in spring and it damaged our fruit trees too. The important thing I learned from it is to examine the fruits now and remove all and any that have been hit. If you don't they'll still grow but with areas of bruising and ultimately rot and will be useless to you. If you take them off then any undamaged ones will grow to be much larger, and if you have to remove them all (which we did on most of our trees) then you allow the tree a year of real grow unimpeded by fruit and your trees will be much healthier for it. It's painful to do but definitely worth it.

You can't fix stupid.
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Originally posted by Hazelpad Hazelpad wrote:

Firstly I love this part of the forum.  Over the years I have learned so much from the posts here.  My bread now has been transformed from bricks to something close to edible.

 I had a 5L bottle of water come off a top shelf and fall about 1.5m straight onto my head yesterday.  Don't need the physics to work out how sore that was.  Still bit dazed today.  Probably explained my bad mood on forum yesterday. So while stores are piled high please secure (especially if you have evil cats like all mine are)

All this effort to SIP and it could have been death by my prep supplies.

Like Penham I am off work for a bit still, but will need to return to lab soon. 

My supplies are OK, but trying to work on a more holistic approach to SIP.  Discovering you have to be quite mentally prepared if you are used to living in a city, so I have learned it's not all about stocking food. 

I have 2 typical teenage city girls and I thought it would be a nightmare, but they have really adapted, my son not so much.  I gave him a search and rescue touch and told him the end was a secret cosh.  He is much happier though I think he could take the planes out the sky the touch is so bright. 

I am inspired by you all and am going to look into planting.  I have 2 greenhouses I have never used and spare ground that must be pretty fertile as when we came here there was originally a vegetable garden.  At moment over run by snails and frogs.

I think food wise I was well prepped thanks to you lot.  Not running done and now entering 3rd month in UK.  Top up with online food but limit this

My son is 10 and outgrown clothes and shoes so need to order some online. He is looking a bit like a skinny version of the incredible hulk with his trousers turning into shorts. That was one prep supply I forgot to consider.  He has no shoes so is riding his scooter about wearing Minecraft creeper slippers.

Glad to hear all your news.

Hz x


Have a look at Charles Dowding on youtube and subscribe to his channel (it's free). He does an amazing no dig gardening method and if you have greenhouses then you'll love him as he starts everything off in modules in his greenhouse and then plants them out when he has a gap to full. I think you're in Scotland aren't you? So you must have a very short growing season so this method would really suit you. It's also great for gardens with lots of slugs and snail - who love new seedling and nibble them off as they break the soil - and with this method you plant out robust little plants. I love him. He's great. And it's so easy.

You can't fix stupid.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 3:33pm

Just a comment on things falling off shelves. I live in a major earthquake zone and we get frequent shakes so I put all the heavy stuff on the lowest shelves and the softer and lighter stuff up high. For example all the tins of dog food are low down, the bags of dog biscuits are up high. The pasta is high, the pasta sauce low. I also have earthquake straps on all the shelves up to shoulder height so things don't shake off and smash, but you won't need those if you live on firmer ground. Tea bags are a good one for going high. I always ask myself, if this fell on me would it hurt, if the answer is no, I go high.

In my old house I had all my saucepans on the top shelf of the larder and I was in there during a big quake and spent about a minute nipping along the shelves pushing them all backwards as they wiggled towards the edge. They now live below waist height in my new house.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hazelpad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 6:34pm

Hi KiwiMum,

Just wanted to pop on quickly to thank you for suggesting Charles Dowding.  I had a little look and he has such a good way of explaining how stuff works. 

 Watched growing lettuce and  part of " no dig garden with cardboard and compost."

Think I am going to like him.  Gives me something to watch, research and plan for my garden.

So thanks for taking time to do that.

Re falling supplies, I have learned the hard way.  Devil cats in high places and heavy water bottles perched on top shelf is an equation for head trauma disaster.  I have no neurological symptoms, just one feels like one has a hangover without touching a drop.

As soon as head stops hurting ,I will rearrange stores.

Gnight from Scotland.

Hz x


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WitchMisspelled Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 7:03pm

Kiwimum, that's where I made my mistake.  Heavy canned goods were on an upper shelf, the pegs got loose and that shelf pancaked down.  I have to call the furniture manufacturer to replace two shelves.  UGH! But it's my own fault for doing a top heavy load.  Had I had them on the second to bottom shelf, it would have pancaked down onto my #10 freeze dried cans and not done any damage.  



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Usk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 06 2020 at 3:58pm

I use plastic bins for canned goods and my mason jars of canned fruit and jellies. That way even when the earth shakes they don’t fall off the shelf

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WitchMisspelled Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 09 2020 at 6:40am

Can I see a show of hands from people who realized they were over-prepped for all this?  Any adjustments you may make?

I raise my hand because I definitely over-prepped.  Food, batteries, etc...  I'm still considering scaling back to two months and donating the rest to a local food pantry. The reason being is that other than paper goods and such, food has been freely available.  A bit more planning for once a week to every 10 days shopping, but that's about it.

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I prepped well, and do not consider at all that I over prepped...I live on the coast and its Hurricane season. Plus, any extra stuff that I feel I have too much of - gets dropped off at my son's and dil's house for them to use.

I still am picking up toilet paper and paper towels when I shop, even if I have stock already. I can only imagine if we get a 2nd wave - those will again be in shortage.

Hard to find ANY Lysol type sprays *even no name brand ones* Or disinfectant wipes (like Clorox) anywhere...it is the most hard to find item in my area at the moment. I plan on getting in a long line at one of our warehouses that has opened to the public (they normally sell to private companies in reg. times) and get some of these items. Still, its a hassle.

I love that I bought a little apt freezer recently! Its proven to be one of the best extra purchases I have found.

I also bless my neighbors with toilet paper and paper towels as little gifts- that makes me happy too!

It gives me peace of mind to be prepared.

'When you feel as though you can't do something, the simple antidote is action: Begin doing it. Start the process, even if it's just a simple step, and don't stop at the beginning.'
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hazelpad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 09 2020 at 12:01pm

I prep always for worst case.  If this virus had had the CFR of say Ebola we would be living in a different world just now.   

Hz x

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 09 2020 at 2:00pm

Don't assume you have over-prepped.  There are insufficient farm workers at present.  That does not bode well for this year's harvest.  Add locusts, minus bees...............................

ERCD
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EdwinSm, Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 09 2020 at 10:43pm

I am tempted to let my preps be used up so I have a lower level of stock...the supply lines have held up much, much better than I feared.  

However, as techno has said, we aren't out of the woods yet.   The supply lines from warehouses has so far been good, but the news from farms etc means that at sometime the reduced input into the system will have to work its way through to the consumer.    I think we will still see among selected goods:-  a) shortages  b) some price rises.

Shortages could lead to the sort of panic buying we saw with toilet paper, so it might be good to keep stock levels high.  This might affect countries differently dependent on how self-sufficient the country is say in food - in this the USA should do better than the UK, and the Netherlands should do very well.

Price rises.  I am not sure which of two conflicting pressures will win out:  Loss of jobs means people have less money to spend which leads to deflationary pressure, but scarcity of items leads to price rises (as we saw at the beginning of the pandemic).   So if one could afford it (ie without taking on credit card debt) I think that keeping a high stock level will be a good financial move.

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We've had shortages of weird things, that have come from overseas. I was very grateful for my large stocks at home. There is only one type of pizza sauce on sale over here and that was out of stock for 8 weeks. Thankfully we had tonnes at home but still I got down to my penultimate bottle. I've since restocked and will keep my stores fully equipped. I've increased the amount of rice I hold as I was tipped off by a buyer for a major supermarket here that they are already struggling to get more stock due to some countries reducing their export of food. 

In the back of my mind is always the threat of the very  large earthquake that we are now officially over due for so I want to be ready for that.

You can't fix stupid.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote hachiban08 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2020 at 7:13pm

I finally found yeast at the store. Some stores set limits and some don't. Even despite the limits, you can barely find it. I can finally make my boule bread at least.

Be prepared! It may be time....^_^v
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Penham Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2020 at 9:22pm

I do not think that I overstocked, I restocked my freezer when I saw the possibility that meat prices were going to go up and I am so glad I did. I was able to get ground beef for $2.79lb, so I saved tons of money since I am not paying $8.79lb for it right now and hopefully that tides me over until the prices come back down. If not, I will use some of my canned meat that I have on hand in meals. I even bought a marked down briskett for $12 something, half price, before all the meat went up. My friend saw a briskett the other day and it was over $100. I wish I would have bought more. I intended to grind it down and use for ground beef if needed, but we ended up grilling it and it was awesome. Like someone else mentioned, I have been unable to locate any Lysol or Clorox wipes at all, even no name brand, since all this started, I had stocked up before and still have some, but now going out to stores I have been using more, taking my own and wiping cart handles down etc. Today I actually found some no name brand pakages and got a couple, it was the first I have seen in months. I have seen no Lysol or disinfectant spray or cleaning type items for counters either, so I am glad I was really stocked up. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote CRS, DrPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2020 at 9:25pm

Originally posted by WitchMisspelled WitchMisspelled wrote:

Can I see a show of hands from people who realized they were over-prepped for all this?  Any adjustments you may make?

I raise my hand because I definitely over-prepped.  Food, batteries, etc...  I'm still considering scaling back to two months and donating the rest to a local food pantry. The reason being is that other than paper goods and such, food has been freely available.  A bit more planning for once a week to every 10 days shopping, but that's about it.

*ahem* you can never over-prep....if you have extra materials left over, well, you got lucky. 

I bought an emergency-band weather radio that I always wanted, and I'm glad I have it.  

As far as paper goods, we had enough to get by, although I was starting to wonder if we'd make it!  Where have all the toilet paper & paper towels gone to?? 

Good news is that our prescription medications were not impacted by supply chain issues as I was fearing; food remained plentiful, water treatment plants worked as they should, gasoline supplies are plentiful, and folks rioted for good causes (police violence) instead of stupid stuff. 

However, it ain't over yet.  We are seeing surges being fed by the folks crowding into churches for Easter, having parties for Mother's Day and Memorial Day, and now the street protests.  Arizona hospitals are in an emergency state. 

Buckle up....this ain't no party, this ain't no disco, this ain't no foolin' around.  Be safe, Chuck

CRS, DrPH
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Penham Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2020 at 9:32pm

We will be having a 2nd wave at some point and I will not be one of those people standing in lines to get in to stores or running out of items for my family. My goal is that my household runs as normally as possible, people and pets are not deprived of their normal lifestyle if I can help it. Outside of our household everything has been turned upside down and crazy, our home needs to be stable, safe and secure and run the same as it always has. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Penham Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2020 at 9:36pm

Yes, Chuck, I was a bit worried about the medication supplies. Especially when I got my refills and they gave me 90 days at a time and they normally only give me 30 days at a time. I didn't question it, but was happy I had the extra!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2020 at 10:23pm

Originally posted by Penham Penham wrote:

Yes, Chuck, I was a bit worried about the medication supplies. Especially when I got my refills and they gave me 90 days at a time and they normally only give me 30 days at a time. I didn't question it, but was happy I had the extra!

Over here we normally get given 90 days at a time, but for the lockdown we've been changed to 30 days. There's no extra cost, you just have to go in once a month to pick up your meds so there wasn't a shortage. I think it has worked so far.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote WitchMisspelled Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2020 at 4:47am

Originally posted by KiwiMum KiwiMum wrote:

Originally posted by Penham Penham wrote:

Yes, Chuck, I was a bit worried about the medication supplies. Especially when I got my refills and they gave me 90 days at a time and they normally only give me 30 days at a time. I didn't question it, but was happy I had the extra!

Over here we normally get given 90 days at a time, but for the lockdown we've been changed to 30 days. There's no extra cost, you just have to go in once a month to pick up your meds so there wasn't a shortage. I think it has worked so far.


I ordered six months worth of meds directly from overseas distributors years ago.  It is the one thing I have been absolutely faithful about rotating in my preps.  I haven't had to dig into them because my meds have remained available. Thank heavens it appears all of this on this forum has been able to obtain our meds!

Okay, you've all convinced me... hold on to and maintain what I have.  I just need to buy a couple of totes to store the canned goods in.  

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Originally posted by CRS, DrPH CRS, DrPH wrote:

I bought an emergency-band weather radio that I always wanted, and I'm glad I have it.  


That was one of the first things I bought years ago when I started prepping.  Last year I bought two solar chargers, one notebook, one small.  This most recent round of preps bought included enloop batteries with solar charger and a camping battery.  And I might buy another camping battery... but more so because it looks like it will be an active hurricane season.  Except for the northeast blackout years back, I have never lost power in my area.  But, NEVER SAY NEVER!

In terms of paper goods... funny story there.  Last fall I needed to restock some tp.  I generally keep a three months store.  I saw a 30 pack of my favored tp online and put two in my cart.  When it was delivered it was two two-packs.  The box was the size of a small refrigerator and had to be delivered by dolly. I went back to my original order and realized I didn't see it was a 2-pack.  So in life's little absurdities, my vision issues worked for me. I still have enough to last me to the end of this year!  As far as the rest of the paper goods, disinfectant spray and wipes, my timing seemed perfect because I ordered everything I needed in bulk at the end of last year and only now need to "fill in".  The only thing I can't find is disinfectant wipes.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2020 at 2:36pm

I'm just restocking things as we use them and rotating through stock. Since we don't have any corona virus here any more, disinfectant and sanitizer and wipes are piled high on the shelves here - no body is buying them urgently. I do keep a pack of disinfectant wipes  and a bottle of hand sanitizer in each of our vehicles.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2020 at 3:01pm

Kiwi Mom- sounds like heaven...LOL...I found disinfectant spray for the first time in months at the store...barely any left and felt like I had won the lottery!

'When you feel as though you can't do something, the simple antidote is action: Begin doing it. Start the process, even if it's just a simple step, and don't stop at the beginning.'
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Legacy57 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2020 at 10:36pm

Hm. No...I think I prepped just right. I joined this forum in 2006 and the sight of all those people lined up for miles just to get water after Katrina scared the bejeezus out of me. I decided that my goal was to have enough food and supplies to survive a reasonable amount of time, but not so much that I would be left here with only the lunatic fringe of "Rambo" preppers like you see on TV with the bunkers and machine guns (sorry...hope I didn't offend anyone) I am mostly grateful for the 70+ N95's I purchased and stored several years ago, which allowed me to supply my immediate family and their children (3 of whom work on the front lines of this), some close friends and still donate a bunch to area hospitals and nursing homes that needed them. Had plenty of TP, bleach and sanitizer. My husband, a professional chef, still jokingly asks when we get to break open the #10 can of dehydrated beef stroganoff from 2006. 😂 He can joke, but he's damn glad we had that TP! Sure did not see the yeast shortage coming. Will make note of that next time. Yeah...we've done all right so far. 👍🏼

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2020 at 2:23pm

Originally posted by Tabitha111 Tabitha111 wrote:

Kiwi Mom- sounds like heaven...LOL...I found disinfectant spray for the first time in months at the store...barely any left and felt like I had won the lottery!

The funny thing is that I stocked up on it in January and bought something like 20 huge bottles. I put them in a box and now I can't find the box. I really can't. I know I was having a resort of my stores and put them somewhere and I honestly can't find them so I've had to buy more to top up the smaller bottles that are in our cars. Haha.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2020 at 2:26pm

We had a yeast shortage here during our lockdown but there was a way around it and that was to buy fresh yeast from a bakery. I find that 100g will make about 12 loaves. I use a lump the size of a large walnut for a batch of 3 loaves. You keep it in the fridge but in a glass jar with a lid and not in the plastic bag that they put it in. I crumble it into a jug, add some molasses, then top up with warm water and give it a good stir. I don't wait for it to froth up, I use is straight away and stir it into the flour and salt.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hazelpad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2020 at 7:03pm

That's a good discussion...has anyone else ever lost any of their preps.

I went through a phase of planting bug out bags about the place over the years.  I have totally lost 2, no idea where I planked them.  

I have also lost 2× 30 kg bags of Iams cat kibble.  Massive bags. God knows where.  My cats couldn't have eaten them because they wouldn't have been able to move.  Tried everywhere, even amongst the litter pile (horse bedding shavings for cat litter).  Honestly I have no idea.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KiminNM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 13 2020 at 12:56pm

Originally posted by Hazelpad Hazelpad wrote:

That's a good discussion...has anyone else ever lost any of their preps.

I went through a phase of planting bug out bags about the place over the years.  I have totally lost 2, no idea where I planked them.  

I have also lost 2× 30 kg bags of Iams cat kibble.  Massive bags. God knows where.  My cats couldn't have eaten them because they wouldn't have been able to move.  Tried everywhere, even amongst the litter pile (horse bedding shavings for cat litter).  Honestly I have no idea.  

Hz x



This made me laugh. I lost a bug out bag also, still no idea where.

More recently, when I was ordering first aid supplies I tore my car apart looking for the large first aid kit I *knew* I had in there. I finally decided it must have been stolen when my car was broken into a few months ago.

2 weeks ago I had to take it in to get a window replaced (vandalized), and took everything out of the car. Opened up the spare tire section to make sure nothing was in there - and found the first aid kit!

I also had to search for days to find something, so am in the middle of a very long process to get things better organized, inventoried, labeled, AND written down! Going to try and keep a 6 months supply of almost everything, and in a tiny apartment that's really challenging.

Hazelpad: As for your cat kibble - If I were storing cat kibble, I'd put it in a plastic bin so bugs couldn't get to it. Then I'd shove it under my bed. Have you tried looking through those?

Re: the earlier discussion on prescription shortages - I haven't been as lucky. Had to wait almost a month to get one of mine, and the price went WAY up, even though it's generic. So on two prescriptions I'm down to a 3 months supply.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 14 2020 at 12:06pm

adding this little tidbit of advice- one thing I have found invaluable are the cans of evaporated milk.  This was also in short supply during lockdown and at least one store was limiting buying quantities on it.
I used a little last night in mac and cheese and then some more for scrambled eggs today.
Great to have on hand if you do not normally buy or use up a big jug of milk or in case you run out of milk  and need it for a recipe, you won't have to run out and get some.

'When you feel as though you can't do something, the simple antidote is action: Begin doing it. Start the process, even if it's just a simple step, and don't stop at the beginning.'
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 27 2020 at 7:24am

We knew this was coming......if you see a good sale, get it in...also not just meat, fruit & veg  maybe..

https://www.agriculture.com/news/business/largest-annual-increase-in-grocery-prices-since-2011?


LARGEST ANNUAL INCREASE IN GROCERY PRICES SINCE 2011

BEEF PRICES WILL RISE BY 8%, PORK BY 4.5%, AND POULTRY BY 3% THIS YEAR COMPARED WITH LAST YEAR, SAID THE USDA.

By Chuck Abbott

6/26/2020


Grocery prices will rise by a higher-than-average 3% this year, due largely to the coronavirus-propelled surge in the cost of meat, poultry, and fish at the supermarket, forecast the USDA on Thursday. It would be the largest increase since 2011 and a rare recent year in which the inflation rate for groceries exceeds the rise in the price of “food away from home,” the category that includes restaurants and fast-food outlets.


Americans are spending a larger share of their food dollar at the grocery store this year, a reflection of stay-at-home orders and the virtual shutdown of the food service sector in March as the coronavirus spread across the country. Meat, poultry, and fish account for one-fifth of grocery spending, and prices for those items are up across the board, said the monthly Food Price Outlook.




Beef prices will rise by 8%, pork by 4.5%, and poultry by 3% this year compared with last year, said the USDA. The increases were especially sharp this spring, when cattle and hog packing plants slowed production because of coronavirus outbreaks among workers and some grocery chains limited meat sales to customers. Beef and veal prices soared by nearly 11% in May alone.


“Processors have implemented health protocols for dealing with COVID-19 that might have hindered their ability to process cattle and hogs, although they have recouped much of the lost slaughter capacity,” said the Food Price Outlook. A weekly USDA report says red meat production — beef, veal, pork, and mutton — since Jan. 1 is 2% behind 2019’s pace. Cattle slaughter is down by 6% and hog slaughter by less than 1% from last year.


Fish and seafood prices will increase by 2% this year, a larger increase than previously forecast but below the 20-year average of 2.4%. 

For beef, pork, and poultry, this year’s increases will exceed their long-term averages. For beef and pork, the increases would be double the average annual rate.

Fruit and vegetable prices were forecast to rise by a modest 1% this year. “With some exceptions, most fresh-market vegetable growers rely on human labor to produce and place a crop into supply channels. It is anticipated that skilled labor will be scarcer and procedural changes to comply with recommended social distancing may reduce productivity,” said the USDA.


More at link....

'When you feel as though you can't do something, the simple antidote is action: Begin doing it. Start the process, even if it's just a simple step, and don't stop at the beginning.'
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote WitchMisspelled Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 27 2020 at 7:42am

Looks like we'll all be looking to do "Meatless Monday" again.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tabitha111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 29 2020 at 8:37am

Oh vey....looks like toilet paper is going to again be scarce ~~I have been buying a package every time I go shopping...not more than one package though...


JUNE 29 2020 - https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6808384/diary-of-an-optimist-the-great-toilet-roll-fear-index/#gsc.tab= 

Diary of an optimist: the great toilet-roll fear index

BY Steve Evans



Sam Walton, the founder of Walmart, the world's biggest supermarket group, used to say he liked seeing dead animals on the road. He thought roadkill was a good indicator of economic activity - the more dead animals, the more his trucks were travelling.


There are other indices of economic activity. Some obvious, some not.


The chief executive of the Royal Australian Mint told me that when times get hard, the use of cash rises. Fearful people want to control their spending and clutching "real" money is more reliable than having the temptation of a credit card.


An American economist came up with the Garbage Index. More rubbish being put out indicates the economy is growing a bit faster.


Lipstick manufacturers tend to do well in recessions. Don't laugh: the research was published in 2012 in the ultra-reputable Scientific American. Maybe tastes have changed. Maybe not.


The author explained: "While periods of abundance favor strategies associated with postponing reproduction in favor of one's own development (e.g. by pursuing an education), periods of scarcity favor more immediate reproduction."


She elaborated on why sales of "lipstick and designer jeans, high-heeled boots and perfume" rise in difficult economic times: "Our findings consistently supported the lipstick effect, as college-age women, when primed with news of economic instability, reported an increased desire to buy attractiveness-enhancing goods, along with a decreased desire to purchase goods that do not enhance one's physical appearance."


And now, after the roadkill, rubbish and lipstick indices, we have the toilet-paper index.


It is not, though, an economic indicator but more a signifier of fear. In March, the shelves were cleared of toilet paper as people panic-bought for fear of the oncoming virus crisis.


And now, the fear is back. Woolworths and Coles have started limiting sales again, foolish though Prime Minister Scott Morrison thought it. "Stop it, it's ridiculous," he said.


And he is right. No doubt about it.


But empty shelves turn us mad. We panic-buy because others have panic-bought.


"In times of stress, emotions are heightened, and consumers feel more pressured to buy on the spot when they see something that is high in demand becoming scarcer," according to Nitika Garg, an associate professor of marketing at the University of New South Wales.


She researches the relationship between emotion and shopping at the UNSW business school.


And she cautions against more madness. "Many people in China are stocking up on toilet paper to make their own masks as a result of the mask shortage. This is not a solution and people in Australia should not be encouraged to stock up on toilet paper to make homemade masks," she said.


So don't do it. Just don't do it.


I won't - but then again, I've still got 12 rolls I bought on eBay from China back in March.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote KiwiMum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 29 2020 at 6:23pm

I feel very strongly that we're in a sort of calm before the storm moment. There seems to be so much civil unrest globally that I'm sure trouble's coming. I think it would be a wise precaution for all of us to check our stores and keep them well stocked.

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