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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic since 2005; Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic Discussion Forum.

WATER

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jacksdad View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: WATER
    Posted: May 23 2019 at 5:42am
The shelf life of unopened bottled water is pretty much indefinite, but I've found that many commercial brands have containers that collapse or start to leak after a while.

"Buy it cheap. Stack it deep"
"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DEON Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 22 2019 at 2:30am
Might someone be able to please reveal to me to what extent business filtered water remains great in 50+ degree temperature?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wtaumme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 05 2016 at 4:39am
Correct process before consuming. Water, an essential component for living on this earth I believe. Food, Air, Water, Land the basis of human life on earth. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Satori Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 03 2014 at 2:16pm

stay away from the Berkey black filters

they are very well known for having a HIGH failure rate


consider this low cost alternative instead


http://www.homespunenvironmental.com/Bucket_Drip_Filtration_System_p/sk-1001.htm


if you have a Berkey black

I would STRONGLY consider testing it several times to make sure it is working

you don't want to find out in an emergency situation that you don't have clean water

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mustang Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 03 2014 at 4:35am
there  are several berkys so which do you recomend or which do you own?
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...alright, I think this is something everyone needs to survive...

Click on The Aporkalypse...

http://www.cafepress.com/votefromtheroof


The Clam
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dragonsprayer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 01 2009 at 5:04pm
2 bucket method is better
 
one bucket is the reactor with bleach and water let sit 4 hours
 
second is filter, you can juse cloth around a carbon filter
 
note: you could make your own carbon, this is the oldest medicien know to man - eating carbon or ccold coal from a fire.
 
make your own carbon and wrap in cloth filter the treached water with it
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mercurymom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 29 2009 at 10:32pm
Hmmm, is there anyway you can use one of those old-fashioned hand pumps for that? The ones that go down in the ground, and are metal, and you pump up and down with them. There are people around here that have them for their well water. I don't know if one can be hooked up as an alternate, though. It seems like something that would have to always be attached, prior to the power going out, and I'm not sure how you'd do that.
There is nothing to fear except the persistent refusal to find out the truth, the persistent refusal to analyze the causes of happenings. ~ Dorothy Thompson
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote travelerrn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 29 2009 at 8:08pm
Need some suggestions....I live in the desert in the southwest.  Water is gold!  We have 5 water barrels for outside use which we fill with grey water for gardening etc.  I keep  a stock of 10 sparkletts bottles on hand, we fill 2L pop bottles and buy cases of bottles of water when there is a good sale, and have multiple aqual tainers (26L).  We also have a water collection roof that drains directly into our cisters. All this water takes up space but you can never have enough. 
 
My issue is the cisterns.   I have 2 which equal 2200 gallons.  They are buried and the problem is the pump is electric.  No power=no water.  Is there a way to have a supplimental manual pump for when the power goes out?   The thought of all that water just sitting there will drive me crazy!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dragonsprayer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 28 2009 at 11:59pm

DO NOT STORE WATER!!!!!

LIVE BY OR FIND A WATER SOURCE!!!!
GET A GALLON OF BLEACH
GET CARBON FILTERS
 
GET A 5 GAL BUCKET
MAKE A WATER PURIFER FROM IT!!!!! ITS EASY GOOGLE IT!!!!!!!
 
BETTER YET
 
GET AN RO AND 12V PUMP USE A CAR BATTERY
 
12V COMPUTER OR FISH PUMPS CAN PUSH THE WATER THROUGH AN RO
 
RESEARCH IT!!!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr.Who Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 09 2009 at 2:28pm
I hope I don't repeat but I didn't want to read so many pages before offering my thoughts.

I have been storing water in  two liter pop bottles. I learned to keep them not quite full since occasionally they freeze. Periodically I replace the water in them. I opted to add bleach later rather than at the beginning. Normally I filter my drinking water but I add it straight from the tap to keep the chlorine the city adds. Like another poster here I have some bleach in the house (for laundry) but because of the shelf life I keep HTH in the garage ( away from the power steering fluid). With the HTH you need to know how much to use to make bleach and then how much to use to purify water.

Every time a pop bottle is emptied I use it for water. I don't have a huge amount now, maybe 80 liters, but it keeps growing. Beyond that I may need to rely on city water, the pump at the forest preserve, snow, rain, or the lake. If I end up using lake water I will filter it with a crude cloth or sand filter and then boil and/or bleach it. To transport pump water I expect I would clean out a plastic utility bin and just let it slosh around when I drove back. If I were out of gas too then the walk would be too far.

We have already had an opportunity to use our water supplies when the city decided to replace the water mains in the area and turned off our water for a little less than a week. One learns a lot in these "dry" runs. I learned that one uses a lot of water to flush a toilet and could easily use up too much at the expense of drinking water. In a real crisis I would make a trip to the lake to flush the toilet which only needs to be done once or twice a day. I learned that it is no fun to wash your hair if the water is at room temp. I learned that you use almost no water to brush your teeth. If I remember right we used about three to four bottles of water per day for cleaning and cooking.  Dish washing with water is a complete waste and I now keep even more paper plates. Even with the paper plates one still needs to wash pots and stirring spoons, etc.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wilfriedsoddemann Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 29 2008 at 10:13pm
CUT THE CHAIN OF INFECTIONS !

Spread of avian flu by drinking water:

Proved awareness to ecology and transmission is necessary to understand the spread of avian flu. For this it is insufficient exclusive to test samples from wild birds, poultry and humans for avian flu viruses. Samples from the known abiotic vehicles as water also have to be analysed. Proving viruses in water is difficult because of dilution. If you find no viruses you can not be sure that there are not any. On the other hand in water viruses remain viable for a long time. Water has to be tested for influenza viruses by cell culture and in particular by the more sensitive molecular biology method PCR.

Transmission of avian flu by direct contact to infected poultry is an unproved assumption from the WHO. There is no evidence that influenza primarily is transmitted by saliva droplets: “Transmission of influenza A in human beings” http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473309907700294/abstract?iseop=true.

There are clear links between the cold, rainy seasons as well as floods and the spread of influenza. There are clear links between avian flu and water, e.g. in Egypt to the Nile delta or in Indonesia to residential districts of less prosperous humans with backyard flocks of birds and without a central water supply as in Vietnam: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol12no12/06-0829.htm. See also the WHO web side: http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/emerging/h5n1background.pdf. That is just why abiotic vehicles as water have to be analysed. The direct biotic transmission from birds, poultry or humans to humans can not depend on the cold, rainy seasons or floods. Water is a very efficient abiotic vehicle for the spread of viruses - in particular of fecal as well as by mouth, nose and eyes excreted viruses. Infected humans, mammals, birds and poultry can contaminate drinking water everywhere. All humans have very intensive contact to drinking water. Spread of avian flu by drinking water can explain small clusters in households too.

Avian flu infections may increase in consequence to increase of virus circulation. Human to human and contact transmission of influenza occur - but are overvalued immense. In the course of influenza epidemics in Germany, recognized clusters are rare, accounting for just 9 percent of cases e.g. in the 2005 season. In temperate climates the lethal H5N1 virus will be transferred to humans via cold drinking water, as with the birds in February and March 2006, strong seasonal at the time when (drinking) water has its temperature minimum.

The performance to eliminate viruses from the drinking water processing plants regularly does not meet the requirements of the WHO and the USA/USEPA. Conventional disinfection procedures are poor, because microorganisms in the water are not in suspension, but embedded in particles. Even ground water used for drinking water is not free from viruses.

In temperate regions influenza epidemics recur with marked seasonality around the end of winter, in the northern as well as in the southern hemisphere. Although seasonality is one of the most familiar features of influenza, it is also one of the least understood. Indoor crowding during cold weather, seasonal fluctuations in host immune responses, and environmental factors, including relative humidity, temperature, and UV radiation have all been suggested to account for this phenomenon, but none of these hypotheses has been tested directly. Influenza causes significant morbidity in tropical regions; however, in contrast to the situation in temperate zones, influenza in the tropics is not strongly associated with a certain season.

In the tropics, flood-related influenza is typical after extreme weather. The virulence of influenza viruses depends on temperature and time. Especially in cases of local water supplies with “young” and fresh influenza-contaminated water from low local wells, cisterns, tanks, rain barrels, ponds, rivers or rice paddies, this pathway can explain H5N1 infections. At 24°C, for example, in the tropics the virulence of influenza viruses in water exists for 2 days. In temperate climates with “older” water from central water supplies, the temperature of the water is decisive for the virulence of viruses. At 7°C the virulence of influenza viruses in water extends to 14 days.

Ducks and rice (paddies = flooded by water) are major factors in outbreaks of avian flu, claims a UN agency: Ducks and rice fields may be a critical factor in spreading H5N1. Ducks, rice (fields, paddies = flooded by water; farmers at work drink the water from rice paddies) and people – not chickens – have emerged as the most significant factors in the spread of avian influenza in Thailand and Vietnam, according to a study carried out by a group of experts from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and associated research centres. See http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=26096&Cr=&Cr1

The study “Mapping H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza risk in Southeast Asia: ducks, rice and people” also concludes that these factors are probably behind persistent outbreaks in other countries such as Cambodia and Laos. This study examined a series of waves of H5N1, a highly pathogenic avian influenza, in Thailand and Vietnam between early 2004 and late 2005. Through the use of satellite mapping, researchers looked at several different factors, including the numbers of ducks, geese and chickens, human population size, rice cultivation and geography, and found a strong link between duck grazing patterns and rice cropping intensity.

In Thailand, for example, the proportion of young ducks in flocks was found to peak in September-October; these rapidly growing young ducks can therefore benefit from the peak of the rice harvest in November-December, at the beginning of the cold: Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos – as opposed to Indonesia – are located in the northern hemisphere.

These peaks in the congregation of ducks indicate periods in which there is an increase in the chances for virus release and exposure, and rice paddies often become a temporary habitat for wild bird species. In addition, with virus persistence becoming increasingly confined to areas with intensive rice-duck agriculture in eastern and south-eastern Asia, the evolution of the H5N1 virus may become easier to predict.

Dipl.-Ing. Wilfried Soddemann - Epidemiologist - Free Science Journalist soddemann-aachen@t-online.de http://www.dugi-ev.de/information.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SusanT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 24 2008 at 6:55am
To Abby or anyone else that knows about wells...
We recently moved to a house that has a 75 foot well, with the water level at 30 feet. It is obviously hooked directly to the house and uses electricity for water supply. I am looking for suggestions for an emergency backup manual way to retrieve water without spending a fortune. Can I adapt our current well shaft with a manual hand pump if I had to? What would I need to do it?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote coyote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 22 2008 at 4:58am
Great posts! thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AbbyH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 20 2008 at 11:53am
I wanted  to answer a couple of water/well questions that I saw raised here. I am no expert, but have learned alot since my well has started having problems.
 
First the point well which someone was considering, takes about that long to drive, anywhere from one to three days. I have driven them. If you drive it more than 20 feet deep, you do not screw the pump directly to the pipe, you must use a drop pipe inside the casing (the pipe you drove into the ground. Also, if you have alot of rocks, or if you have a clay soil, you will have problems.
 
It was explained to me this way. A hand dug well, which has a large diameter, will act as a cistern, the water will slowly flow the particles into the well, so clay soils a hand dug well is ok. If you use a point well, there is no resivour to hold enough water to draw on, and the water does not have enough time to flow directly from the aquafur to the pump, as  you are useing the aquafur as your "cistern". Also if you have alot of rocks in your area, while driving the well, if you hit one of these, a point well cannot penitrate the rock and you have to pull it up and try again in another area...trial and  error.
 
There are many  kinds of hand pumps and there are two types that are for either shallow wells, or deep wells. A deep well pump has a drawing ability for access water up to 200 feet. Deeper than that, and it takes to much effort to draw it up. Humans are just not that strong. The deep well pumps for wells up to 200 feet has a chamber that is inserted into the well, and the pump that is hand pumped up at the top.
 
Also, when putting in a hand pump, use care in selecting the pump. The cheap ones are  more open and debris can get into your well or cistern and foul it. Be sure to spend the extra money to be sure your hand pump is a closed unit and sealed well so it keeps your water supply clean...nothing worse than fouled water.
 
I have looked into what they now call a "rainwater catchment systen" but have not solved some of the problems of living in a part of the country that has strong winters below freezing.
 
I have learned alot of this stuff as I have had serious problems with my well and am looking for a solution I can afford. There are lots of books on the subject. Just check out amazon.com. I have been talking with plumbers, well driving companies, engineers,  professors at some of the local univerities, Lifewater, Engineers Without Borders, other private nonprofits, and government agencies such as the state Dept of Envoronmental Management. They all had alot to teach me, and could help any of you interested in a private water source.
There is nothing to fear except fear alone. FDR
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AbbyH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 20 2008 at 11:25am
I have been progressing well, except for one area.....water. In our town we depend on private wells, which is great, except that this year the water table dropped and my present well is no longer producing enough water for the house. I am now doing the jug thing. It is  good trial run for bad times.
 
I have found a couple of things that will help make the jug thing more comfortable. First of all, for bathing, a couple of dishpans to put water in, and a Coleman bag shower make things alot better. I use the sishpans for mixing the water to get the right temperature for hair washing. I then use a saucepan as a dipper to pour the water over my head and hair. The shower bag  hung in the bathtub area works out well. For the wash basin to wash your hands, save one of those huge laundry soap jugs and use it for hand washing. Filled with water it makes a nice spiggot for the wash basin. Do not use it for potable water, but it makes a good utility water for wasing up. I keep a gallon water jug of drinkable water for brushing my teeth and drinking.  If any of you has a swimming pool (either above ground or in ground), dip water up in buckets and keep in in the bathroom for flushing the toilet.
 
In the kitchen I have one of those 4 or 5 gallon jugs with a hand pump on it to use for cooking. Just pump out the water you need. I also keep a gallon jug on the counter so I can have it more portable than the big jug. Its easier to fill the dogs water, etc.
 
I do have one of those filters, but have not had to use it yet, but have it just in case. Remember, boiling helps alot, heat kills the bugs, but filters will help clean out debris, flavors or poisonous stuff.
 
I also reuse water as much as I can. I wash the dishes, pour the dishwater into a bucket and  put pinesol (or whatever you use), use it to wash the floors, then use it to flush the toilet when I need it. Also soapy water can be used to water plants, but without the pinesol1`.
 
I also found using gallon jugs much more convient than the soda bottles, and storing them in milk crates works best for me. The soda bottles are just to small to be practical, unless its just for drinking. With washing, bathing, cooking, and drinking I use anywhere from 8 to 16 gallons a day. That does not include to pool water for flushing the toilet.
 
Oh, yes, I almost forgot, get a large plastic funnel, to refill the "spiggot jug" from the gallon jugs and the kitchen 4-5 gallon jug. Lugging these big things to and from your water source just is to exhausting. Gallon jugs...that is the best size for me, not to big, not to small, or to heavy.
 
I also found you will be far more inclind to drink teas, both regular and herbal, and in the warm weather, those koolaide type drinks. So, stock up on both of these.
 
I just thought this might be helpful for some real time experience I have had. I hope this helps.
 
Now, to find the money or financial assistance to drill the new well......lol
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote web ferret Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 27 2008 at 5:15am
This site will tell you everything you need to know about different filters.
I recommend you look at their emergency syphon kits
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2008 at 10:51pm
Got hold of a Berkey distributor said that the filter was not made in China it is made in North America.

I found a company that sells both the Berkey and the Brit. Berkefeld. Asked them a lot of questions I will share what they say.

The black berkey distributor said that they improved the Brit Berkefeld by adding carbon. You can use either of the filters to make a home unit. I have no skills so I will buy a unit and I live in Colorado and there is arsnic in the water from gold mines so I need to have those filters also.

I will get back to you jacksdad on this water thing.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2008 at 7:48pm
I wonder what the difference is performance-wise between the two filters? I've been considering a couple of Black Berkeys.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 26 2008 at 9:35am
FYI...there is a difference in the Berkey Filter Systems and the Original British Berkefeld Systems which are listed under Doulton USA.

I just get these gut feelings especially when all the Berkey Distributors are out of the Black Berkey Filters (made in China)! So I went searching and the British Berkefeld made by Doulton USA has a White Ceramic Filter and is the original and they are NOT out of filters (made in England).

Thought this was interesting!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SusanT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2008 at 10:32am
Thanks H2H... I'll check it out.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote H2HPrep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2008 at 9:50am
Susan T,
 
Start by asking your mayors office for advice.
They will know whom you should call.
County and state government agencies monitor surface and sub-surface water.
 
Also, contact the reference desk of your local library.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote coyote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2008 at 4:00am
Containers That Can be Used for Water Storage

Food-grade plastic or glass containers are suitable for storing water. One-, three- and five-gallon water containers can be purchased from most outdoor or hardware stores. Any plastic or glass container that previously held food or beverages such as 2-liter soda bottles or water, juice, punch or milk jugs, also may be used. Stainless steel can be used to store water which has not been or will not be treated with chlorine; chlorine is corrosive to most metals.

Clean used containers and lids with hot soapy water. Once the containers have been thoroughly cleaned, rinse them with water and sanitize the containers and lids by rinsing them with a solution of 1 tablespoon chlorine bleach per gallon of water. Leave the containers wet for two minutes, then rinse them again with water. Remember to remove the paper or plastic lid liners before washing the lids. It is very difficult to effectively remove all residue from many containers, so carefully clean hard-to-reach places like the handles of milk jugs. To sanitize stainless steel containers, place the container in boiling water for 10 minutes. Never use containers that previously held chemicals.


Emergency Water Storage

How to Store Water
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SusanT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 23 2008 at 6:32pm
Great deal on large water containers if you live in or near Georgia:

http://bham.craigslist.org/grd/725145587.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 21 2008 at 7:35am
Richard, I thought a hand pump would only work if the well was less than 30 feet. Tell me more. Would it be easier to use 2 inch pipe? We have a metal roof and I would love to have it guttered and have a big plastic tank for the gutters to empty into. But I want the hamd pump also. We may have to irrigate a garden. We have a jet pump and the 4 inch with the pump on bottom but all that takes elec. I want backups.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SusanT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 21 2008 at 5:07am
Richard, How can you find out if an area is suitable for drilling? I already have a well in my current home, but I recently found out we will have to move in the next 3 months for my husband's job. I am looking for a house with a well/septic tank, but since we are moving much closer to a larger city it is very difficult to find one. So, I think my "plan B" is to buy a house with city water and have a well drilled, but is there a way to determine the feasibilty of this before buying?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RICHARD-FL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2008 at 6:40pm
Mississipp Mama :  You should look into a shallow well you can put in your self.
 
All you need is a couple of strong guys, the proper equipment, a 3 day weekend, and a case or two of cold beer!    :)
 
Home depot has the equipment to help.  It all depends on the sub-soil conditions where you live.  Is it sand or lime stone?
 
I put a 55' well in my back yard over a 3 day weekend for under 400 dollars.  That is with a 4" pipe.  I use a hand pump to bring up water as I need it. 
 
 
Good points:  It is fast , cheap and you do not need the EPA involved.
 
Bad Points:  It is shallow so if you have a drought you may run dry.
                    It all depends on the soil conditions  if you can drill
"...No man is an island on to himself..." Words to remember

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote starspirit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 13 2008 at 9:54pm
one of the farm supplies store around here had 55 gallon plastic drums for $39. I haven't check them out yet..most areas have feed or grain stores around...lots of people with horses etc...we have sheep....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 13 2008 at 8:52pm
Just checked their site and that's the price for one liner with a minimum order of 50. United States Plastic Corp. has them for sale in any amount you like though. Good prices too. Anybody else gone the steel drum route? It seems that the plastic drums are the most popular, although the ones I've seen are also more expensive than the steel drums I just picked up. I figure a few more dollars for good FDA approved liners and I'll be in good shape. If I can clear a space for another two I might make the most of it and pick up some more while I can. 220 gallons of storage for $50 plus the liners seems like a good deal.
"Buy it cheap. Stack it deep"
"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote H2HPrep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2008 at 12:59pm
Drum liners are a good idea.
 
55 gallon, low density, polyethylene, form-fit liner, meets FDA standards 4 mil to 10 mil thick, $6.00 per 50.
 
Solid, smooth or accordion, formed inserts 18 mil thick, $12.00 per 15
 
Rigid poly covers, opaque or clear, $7.00 per 25.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2008 at 12:12pm
Well, after making a big deal about not wanting water containers that take up too much space, I bought a couple of steel 55 gallon drums. The price was right ($25 for two - they would have let me have them for $10 each if I'd bought more than five) and so the back of the motorhome is now even more cluttered. They're in beautiful shape and just need a wash (they had silicone in them) but they're new and the inside is coated so they should be okay for water, although I'm looking into getting some food grade drum liners to make doubly sure though.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote starspirit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2008 at 6:51pm
Tadeo...the plastic in case water is Not safe for long storage..Walmart or other  stores of this type carry water containers in the camping goods department on the bottom the code HDPE with a triangle with a 2 in it..the ones I have hold 7 gal and stack......flumom gave us the link to cube4water.com
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote starspirit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2008 at 6:37pm
well then I guess you know the type real wellLOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tadeo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2008 at 6:17pm
Thanks Jacksdad, you saved me $60.  I didn't even care to think of food grade.  I knew about it but it just didn't cross my mind.  Thanks!  I guess i'll just continue to stock up on case water.
 
Starspirit, no I don't know them.  When we walked by all I saw was these four large, very large containers sitting in their driveway.  When we came back from running they weren't there anymore.  I have seen them before, they are a couple in their fifties???  I think they are probably one those crazy survivalist types who are preparing for some sort of disaster.  Bunch of nut jobs!  Big%20smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2008 at 10:16am
Tadeo - many plastics (unless they're specifically "food grade") contain toxins such as lead that can leach into stored water. If you have a filter capable of removing the bad stuff you'll be okay. I just priced up a collapsible "onion" container for storing potable water (too expensive - $1600 with a lid for 600 gallons), and the salesman told me that the material on the outside was different from the inside. The lining had to be made of an FDA approved material to make it suitable for storing potable water. Even regular garden hoses have warnings about not using them for drinking water because of the lead content.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote starspirit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2008 at 9:27am
Tadeo..do you know these neighbors....are they using them for water...or what else, that many chemicals in any neighborhood would be dangerous ....trying not to be an alarmist ..but it might be a good idea to keep your eyes open.....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tadeo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 09 2008 at 10:14pm
Wow!  That's alot of money to store water.  I think I may stick to just getting one of those above ground pools and cover it.  The one I am looking at holds 526 gallons (8'x30") for $50 at Walmart.  Oh, and a bottle of bleach.  What is it, 7 drops of bleach per gallon of water?
"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is it's natural manure." -Thomas Jefferson.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote H2HPrep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 09 2008 at 11:54am
Tadeo, here is a link. www.chdist.com
 
The tank your describing sounds like the Schultz IBC Tank.
It is a square polyethylene tank enclosed with an electrogalvanized cage.
It is UN Certified for hazardous materials. They cost $1.40 per gallon up to 330 gallons.
This is a sophistigated tank for neighborhood use??!??!!??
 
A good tank for water is the Centennial Storage Tanks.
They come in sizes of 110 gallons for $196.00
to 2500 gallons for $1,368.00 
 
As jacksdad said, you should be able to find lower cost
low-tech tanks from other sources.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 09 2008 at 9:57am
    No links that I know of - I don't think they're commercially available. If anyone starts making them, you know where to send the check...   
    The containers with steel cages can be bought new on the internet, and I've seen used ones on Craigslist and eBay, but you have to be sure you can clean them. I've seen them used for mineral oil and chemicals. New ones are pretty pricey but extremely durable. The problem for me is that they take up a lot of space when they're not being used. I'm thinking of something that will store flat until I need it. I've got a house and yard full of toys (who knew Hot Wheels made so many things?) so space is important at the moment.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tadeo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 08 2008 at 11:09pm
Jacksdad, I am having a hard time visualizing this project.  Is there a link you can provide. 
I went for a walk the other morning and I saw a neighbor have delivered 4 huge plastic square containers with what looked like some sort of metal framing going around it.  Anyway they sit in their garage???  I am guessing these things must hold 500 gal each.  Are these what cost $1 per gallon to buy?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 08 2008 at 8:18pm
Ooh - I like the way you think...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote H2HPrep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 08 2008 at 5:05pm
When she's not looking, dig up the back yard and bury a big tank. Fill it with
harvested roof rain. Easy breezy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 08 2008 at 3:05pm
   The price of the ones I saw advertised on the internet was what got me thinking about a home brewed version that you could break down into easily storable components. Apart from the expense, my wife would kill me if I had a 500+ gallon water container sitting in the back yard. I reckon a couple of hundred dollars at the most would build a good sized one.
Starspirit - I've seen those containers that fit in the bathtub. It's actually what got me thinking about a homebuilt container, as the plastic isn't required to be strong enough to hold the water itself - it's the bathtub that provides the support. Reinforced plywood panels (much like the ones they use to make concrete structures) would take the pressure and you could tailor the size to your needs. The bathtub one is about 50 gallons, I believe.
  The homemade "Gilmor" filter is on page 16 of this thread. It looks pretty straightforward to make, although it's nowhere near as sexy as the stainless steel Berkey unit. However, with the savings you could put together a few of them and have more than enough water.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote H2HPrep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 08 2008 at 2:44pm

Commercial grade barrels for water cost about $1.00 per gallon up to 500 gallons.

The 2000 gallon barrels are about $1000.
A homemade version makes good $ sense.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote starspirit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 08 2008 at 1:11pm
jacksdad couldn't open the link about filter...I have a link I'm not sure if I got it here for a bladder for a bathtub...if you could find used tubs and line them up some where   or stack them using a metal frame system....just a thought....want to get one of these bladders have only one tub other bath has a shower ...so could still use it and if waters off well I have camping shower I could hang up.....
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