Click to Translate to English Click to Translate to French  Click to Translate to Spanish  Click to Translate to German  Click to Translate to Italian  Click to Translate to Japanese  Click to Translate to Chinese Simplified  Click to Translate to Korean  Click to Translate to Arabic  Click to Translate to Russian  Click to Translate to Portuguese  Click to Translate to Myanmar (Burmese)

PANDEMIC ALERT LEVEL
123456
Forum Home Forum Home > Coronavirus Pandemic: Prepping Forums > Extra Prepping > Electricity and Solar Energy
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - ELECTRICITY
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Coronavirus Pandemic Discussion Forum.

ELECTRICITY

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
Author
Message Reverse Sort Order
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: ELECTRICITY
    Posted: August 16 2018 at 7:00pm
Read that somewhere so I can't take credit for that idea to paint fire residual before you board up. I need to purchase more plywood boards to fit my windows. I have some already in the garage but need more as well as a case of long screws and manual ratchet screw driver. I invest slowly but my son will have it when I am gone. He is a believer in prepping, takes after his mom.
Back to Top
Technophobe View Drop Down
Assistant Admin
Assistant Admin
Avatar

Joined: January 16 2014
Location: Scotland
Status: Online
Points: 74960
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 15 2018 at 7:54pm
Thank you, FluMom! That spray paint is a great idea.
Absence of proof is not proof of absence. & Never underestimate the power of human stupidity.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 15 2018 at 5:37pm
I prep for the worst case. I will cook and/or dry everything I have in my fridge and freezer WTSHTF. After that drying, salting and canning will have to do. I have several ways to cook the most important is wood with a volcano, second is a solar oven. I have a couple of canners, and need to purchase more jars and lids.

To keep warm a fireplace insert all the manual saws and shims to fell trees, I still have to build a holder to cut the logs. Have to get logs from around my area but I keep 4-5 cords on my property at all times. This gives time to let the new wood dry for a year.   


Go to bed when the sun goes down and get up when it comes up. Doing all the work to cook, get food(anything you can get), firewood, digging latrines, washing clothes, getting water will make you want to sleep alot anyway.


Save your gas for getting water forget a generator. It will make noise and tell people you have what they don't have and they will come to get it.


WTSHTF people will be surprised at how hard things will truly be and that keeping a low profile is best. I plan on putting all my firewood into one bay of my garage and all my water making in my basement. Very little will be outside except an outhouse across the street in the park. The less people see the better.

I will board up my house and make it look like we had a fire with spray paint.

So forget all the comforts if TSHTF life will be hard.
Back to Top
edprof View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: October 16 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 293
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote edprof Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 15 2018 at 8:07am
Originally posted by wrote:

Originally posted by dundeels01 dundeels01 wrote:


 They have 15- 5 gallon gas cans that were all empty.  <FONT color=#00ff00>When you open the fourth can, must refill the other three, that's what I do if my husband doesn't. We keep two out of normal usage which helps me know when he's on the fourth can.[/COLOR]

 

The next time that I get down there, in the very near future, I'm going to go through Generator 101 with them again.  <FONT color=#00ff00>I wrote down EVERY STEP, from moving the generator into place to throwing the switch to disconnect from the city line to checking the oil, fuel, and hookups. To exactly how to start, load, and shut down. WRITE IT DOWN, put in a plastic document cover, attach to the generator. [/COLOR]

<FONT color=#00ff00>[/COLOR] 

It really is something that most people should review on a somewhat regular basis, it probably would not hurt to actually perform a test run either if you have never done so in the past.  <FONT color=#00ff00>Our storm two weeks ago took our power (only a few hours, but we did not know what happened). For us, we have a water-well, no power, no water. Husband had me do all the steps following my notes from the December outages. [/COLOR]

 

Many people take for granted that they will be able to run these things, but when it comes down to it, it is often not that easy or as safe as one would think. <FONT color=#00ff00>Found out that I did not know how to reset the Safety Pressure Switch in the pump house. More notes now attached inside the pump house and we bought a spare safety switch.[/COLOR]

 

That's why you always hear of the carbon monoxide deaths of home owners and electrocutions of utility workers when these things are not used properly.

<FONT color=#00ff00>Sounds like you made sure the Utility Workers were protected. Carbon Monoxide detectors are important in the home. JaxMax made an interesting point, his detector went off from so many neighbors using their generators at night, they all agreed not to run generators while sleeping. Had not thought of that. [/COLOR]

 

The only advice that I can give from my parents experience last night, is it is extremely important to be familiar with your equipment and know how to use it  because you never know when you just might actually need it. <FONT color=#00ff00>Good advice, thank you. [/COLOR]


We have similar equipment and go through similar steps monthly.

Oftentimes the Lord helps those who help themselves.
Back to Top
edprof View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: October 16 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 293
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote edprof Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 15 2018 at 8:05am
Originally posted by Spoon Spoon wrote:

Ella,


Standard A/Cs and Refrigerators are expensive to power off-grid.  I have very little knowledge about water or wind power, but have been researching solar for the past several months.


Backwoods Solar was a big help.  They start with the basics and then breakdown several popular sample systems.  You can see what it takes, and costs, for your power needs.


Sunfrost makes the best line of high-efficient refrigerators/freezers that work well with solar power.



Standard A/C is almmost prohobitive to operate off grid. We have a 6,000 watt solar grid and can operate a 1.5 ton A/C unit during the middle of a sunlit day. The main unit, a 3 ton, is simply too much.
Oftentimes the Lord helps those who help themselves.
Back to Top
toms02 View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: May 09 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 50
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toms02 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 09 2013 at 12:44am
Electricity is been a big role in life of people and without it many will get annoyed.In Finland electricity is problem of some people because of electricity price at http://www.lannenomavoima.fi/ is getting higher and many force to save electricity to save money.
Back to Top
Penham View Drop Down
Chief Moderator
Chief Moderator
Avatar
Moderator

Joined: February 09 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 13083
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penham Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 22 2010 at 9:55pm
Originally posted by jacksdad jacksdad wrote:

Oldish thread but FluMom raised a good point concerning natural gas. It's anybody's guess which utility would go off first, but I read somewhere that natural gas would present a major problem when it came to turning it back on again. Any pilot lights left on when the gas ran out would represent an explosion hazard when it was restored, so the companies would be forced to go door to door and ensure every pilot light was shut off before they could begin pumping to any neighborhoods fed by a common main pipe. That in itself could represent a huge delay, and it would conceivably happen every time the flow of gas was interrupted. Just a thought.
 
Most natural gas appliances have automatic cutoff systems in place when ever the gas goes out or the appliance stops working for some reason, the gas automatically stops flowing to the appliance. We have central heat and air, but the heat part runs off natural gas, if something goes wrong with the heating system the pilot light automatically shuts itself off, the gas stops flowing when it cuts itself off.  Our hot water heater is the same way, when our hot water heater went bad and had to be replaced, the pilot automatically cut itself off.  The gas wall heater we bought for backup heat is also the same way, anything wrong with the heater the gas automatically cuts itself off, they have some type of sensors in them nowadays. The gas doesn't just free flow to pilot lights, you have to actually turn knobs to turn the gas flow on to light the pilots.  Now maybe if you had a REALLY old appliance it would keep flowing, like our bathroom wall heater does not cutoff automatically (house built in 1930) but we only use that in an emergency and I actually remove the handle and keep it in a drawer so it can't be turned on unless it is an emergency.
Back to Top
StarBright View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member


Joined: June 21 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StarBright Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 21 2010 at 10:22pm
Just remember that the life of the generator in a coleman stove will be shortened if you use unleaded fuel. It says so in the instructions near the end.  If you have to use unleaded fuel anyway in an emergency, just remember it has toxic additives.  Cover the pot and avoid breathing any fumes.


Back to Top
jacksdad View Drop Down
Executive Admin
Executive Admin
Avatar

Joined: September 08 2007
Location: San Diego
Status: Offline
Points: 46136
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2009 at 2:42pm
Oldish thread but FluMom raised a good point concerning natural gas. It's anybody's guess which utility would go off first, but I read somewhere that natural gas would present a major problem when it came to turning it back on again. Any pilot lights left on when the gas ran out would represent an explosion hazard when it was restored, so the companies would be forced to go door to door and ensure every pilot light was shut off before they could begin pumping to any neighborhoods fed by a common main pipe. That in itself could represent a huge delay, and it would conceivably happen every time the flow of gas was interrupted. Just a thought.
"Buy it cheap. Stack it deep"
"Any community that fails to prepare, with the expectation that the federal government will come to the rescue, will be tragically wrong." Michael Leavitt, HHS Secretary.
Back to Top
Lone Wolf View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member


Joined: October 28 2007
Status: Offline
Points: 253
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lone Wolf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 11 2009 at 9:53pm
fab4 - Tri-Fuel Carburetor, Gasoline, Natural gas, Propane.
 
 
Hope it helped,  Lone Wolf.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 22 2008 at 10:16pm
Originally posted by FluMom FluMom wrote:

Question: if I put in a natural gas generator and the BF hits will natural gas keep coming through the pipes? I figure that natural gas is a good way to run a generator because all the government emergency compounds are run on natural gas.
Anyone out there know if natural gas will keep coming or will it get shut off like water?
FluMom, Richard-FL is correct. Pipeline flow is regulated. Sure alot is computerized but man still controls the operations. We are putting in a propane tank. I have just learned that the natural jets on my gas stove will need to be swapped out (very cheap to do) with a smaller jet opening for the propane bottle. I want to also have a backup when natural gas stops. We are still in the process of building, I want the propane jets in so I KNOW it's up and operational. Not sure what is done for the oven or griddle deck.
Back to Top
RICHARD-FL View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: May 13 2008
Location: N.E. Florida
Status: Offline
Points: 98
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RICHARD-FL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 22 2008 at 4:48pm
Just like all other utilities if Humans are involved in any way it will likely be closed down due to lack of raw material, shipping, supervisors, and workers.  Once this pandemic hits your area, you will notice the stoppage of sewage, water,  gas, and electrical power.
 
Remember we expect a minimum of 30% sick out rate.  That means they have to operate at a 30% + loss rate or every 3rd person at work missing.
"...No man is an island on to himself..." Words to remember

RICHARD-FL
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 29 2008 at 8:44pm
Question: if I put in a natural gas generator and the BF hits will natural gas keep coming through the pipes?

I figure that natural gas is a good way to run a generator because all the government emergency compounds are run on natural gas.

Anyone out there know if natural gas will keep coming or will it get shut off like water?
Back to Top
quietprepr View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: May 21 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 2400
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote quietprepr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 29 2008 at 11:11am
You can do either as long as you have the right equipment. I would consult a professional if you are unsure of the process...that helps avoid the explosions!
"Learning is not compulsory... neither is survival." - W. Edwards Deming
Back to Top
fab4 View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member


Joined: April 12 2008
Location: GA
Status: Offline
Points: 39
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fab4 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 28 2008 at 3:49pm
My propane tank is 300 gallons  sitting in my yard.   Can you hook that kind of tank to a generator?   Or can you fill smaller propane tanks with a big propane tank?  I can just see us creating some big explosion Ouch
Back to Top
quietprepr View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member
Avatar

Joined: May 21 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 2400
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote quietprepr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 28 2008 at 12:18pm
Originally posted by fab4 fab4 wrote:

Old topic but new question - I am looking for a system to power an air purifier and/or CPAP machine - not long term, only for sick room.    Those are the only two things I haven't been able to cover by other means.  Looking into solar for that but it's too costly right now.
 
Another idea I had is this - we have a propane tank outside - don't they make propane generators?  How do you get the propane to the generator.   I know there are relatively inexpensive standby systems out there but require installation which is costly.  Any thoughts?
 
There are many different generators that run on propane. Also, there are companies that make kits to convert gasoline generators to propane. You could use a small generator to charge a few 12 volt batteries and use an inverter to operate the purifier/CPAP machine. That way the generator would not have to run continuously, making your fuel last longer.
"Learning is not compulsory... neither is survival." - W. Edwards Deming
Back to Top
fab4 View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member


Joined: April 12 2008
Location: GA
Status: Offline
Points: 39
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fab4 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 27 2008 at 5:04pm
Old topic but new question - I am looking for a system to power an air purifier and/or CPAP machine - not long term, only for sick room.    Those are the only two things I haven't been able to cover by other means.  Looking into solar for that but it's too costly right now.
 
Another idea I had is this - we have a propane tank outside - don't they make propane generators?  How do you get the propane to the generator.   I know there are relatively inexpensive standby systems out there but require installation which is costly.  Any thoughts?
Back to Top
Irene View Drop Down
Adviser Group
Adviser Group


Joined: June 26 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 46
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Irene Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 26 2006 at 2:26pm
Instructions for building your own generator:
 
 
 
Back to Top
Bill 100 View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member


Joined: May 21 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 524
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill 100 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2006 at 11:49am
A storm is coming !
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2006 at 11:21am

How to build an Iceless Refrigerator (page 1) or a Burlap or Evaporation Cooler (page 2):

http://geocities.com/olstk/refrigerator.pdf

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2006 at 1:27pm
Just for kicks, I hooked up two 115 ah (6 volt) golf cart batteries in series, with an inverter. Plugged in a vacuume cleaner running 6 amps (about 660 watts), it lasted 15 minutes before the inverter sounded letting me know the batteries were at half charge.
Back to Top
2ifbyC View Drop Down
Adviser Group
Adviser Group


Joined: March 30 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 533
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 2ifbyC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2006 at 1:10pm
Originally posted by Web Ferret Web Ferret wrote:

the start-up surge is 1000W. 
 
Hopefully the freezer won't spike your 600 watt inverter on start up. If the spike period is short enough you might be OK. Have you tested the freezer/inverter combo out yet?
 
 
 
.
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2006 at 11:33am
The freezer runs at 80 watts - the start-up surge is 1000W.  Its a very efficient and well insulated Bosch. I have a power meter that measures this stuff - I know its accurate as I have tested it with 60W and 100W light bulbs. 
I have no idea what BF outages may be - I'm just guessing and preparing as best I can like every one else on here.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2006 at 10:27am
If your outages are less than a day at a time why worry? If its cold  the freezer will last for days. Just buy a couple extra blankets.
Back to Top
2ifbyC View Drop Down
Adviser Group
Adviser Group


Joined: March 30 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 533
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 2ifbyC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2006 at 7:34am
Web Ferret,
 
Have you checked the wattage of your freezer? Most power charts put them at 600-1000 watts. The start-up surge will be closer to the top end.
Survival does have an 'I'!

Dodging 'canes on Florida's central Gulf Coast
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2006 at 2:25am
I can't run the central heating without electric (draws 125Watts at most) and we have a lot of food in freezers.  Also our gas fire has a fan that requires 35 Watts.  So the inverter is for an hours heating and 2 hours freezer running per day.  I am assuming that the gas is less likely to go off and if it does we just wrap up.
I am hoping that here in the UK the power outages will be less than a day at a time and that I can charge my batteries in between.  I forsee many short power outages rather than any prolonger one (beacuse the country would be totally stuffed otherwise)
Back to Top
MercutioATC View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MercutioATC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2006 at 12:27am
Originally posted by libbyalex libbyalex wrote:

Simple, I know. When it gets dark outside, go to bed. When dawn breaks, wake up! Adapt schedule to the rising and setting of the sun. -- Libby


I spent 9 days at an ecoresort in Costa Rica a few years ago.  It's very easy to adjust to the "up at dawn, down at sunset" schedule whenthere are no computers and TVs to keep you awake.


Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 27 2006 at 12:06pm
Differant cars have differant alternators. Check you manual as it should tell you.  Idle cas use. Anybodys guess. Ask a dealer maybe. Cars can overheat if idled too long so watch the temp gauge closely.

I think you better try the inverter first with a full battery.  It won't  last long.   The inverter draws a lot of juice.

  A better way to power light bulbs is the 12v battery itself.  Get some RV bulbs-they come 50W.  Buy some old  lamps at a garage sale, cut the  plugs off and strip them down to attach to a battery. 
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 27 2006 at 11:37am
I have a 600W pure sine wave inverter and a 110Ah deep cycle battery and a decent ctek battery charger for charging when the power is back on.
 
Now my questions.  I am thinking of running my cars engine to power the inverter if the electric is off for a while (my tank never gets more than half empty).
Anyone know how many amps a car alternator gives? How much fuel do cars (1.6 and 2 Litre engines) use when iding?
Back to Top
AVanarts View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member


Joined: March 30 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 97
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AVanarts Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 25 2006 at 10:52am
Originally posted by Eagles Dancing Eagles Dancing wrote:

A rick is four feet high 16" to 24" wide and eight feet long stack of wood.  We sell wood around here in "rick".  A rick runs about $35 to $40.
 
Some folks use the term instead of a cord of wood.
 
That's a clear as mud.
 
You have to remember I am from the sticks in Southern Indiana.
 
Sorry for the confusion.
 
A Cord of wood is defined as 128 cubic feet, or 4ft x 4ft x 8ft.  I don't know if a "rick" is formally defined, but a Cord sure is.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 25 2006 at 10:32am
I'm a first-class moron, it's under survival tips
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 25 2006 at 10:31am
Help needed!! Would you electrical whizz-kids PLEASE take a look at question for Ice under priority preps?? Pretty PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 10:13pm
Here's a interesting tip for those who have water on their property:
 
Quote A lake, pond, or stream can be a good source of refrigeration. You can fill a metal picnic cooler with food and put the cooler in the water, making sure that either the cooler has a watertight seal so the foods keep dry inside or keep the top of the cooler above the water level. Unopened canned drinks can be kept icy cold submersed in a running stream.
 
 
Back to Top
Eagles Dancing View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: April 03 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 190
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eagles Dancing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 6:22pm
A rick is four feet high 16" to 24" wide and eight feet long stack of wood.  We sell wood around here in "rick".  A rick runs about $35 to $40.
 
Some folks use the term instead of a cord of wood.
 
That's a clear as mud.
 
You have to remember I am from the sticks in Southern Indiana.
 
Sorry for the confusion.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 6:10pm
How much wood is a rick? I have never heard that term is it equivlant to a cord?
Back to Top
Eagles Dancing View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: April 03 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 190
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eagles Dancing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 5:28pm
 We purchased a wood furnace that heats the house, barn, greenhouse and supplies us with hot water.
 
Even with the mild winter we went through 45 + ricks of wood!!
 
We sure didn't see that coming.  We had 30 rick cut up and thought that would be plenty. 
 
So we need to start building that old wood pile up again and this time add 20 ricks to our pile on top of the huge one we had last year.
 
That new chainsaw we bought will really get a work out this year.
Back to Top
Eagles Dancing View Drop Down
Valued Member
Valued Member
Avatar

Joined: April 03 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 190
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eagles Dancing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 5:14pm

We plan to revamp the old spring house to keep items cool this summer.

This is a small building with a cement floor which has a trough that the cold spring water stream pours into.
 
If if was good enough for our fore fathers its good enough for me. 
 
I can't wait to chill some homemade elderberry wine and kick back and enjoy the pleasures that come from living in the sticks.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 2:25pm
Additional generator safety note:    

Do not connect generator to your house wiring unless you have a transfer switch installed and approved by a registered electrician, so you do not send out power on the incoming line. A transfer switch isolates your house circuit from that of the power company.
Back to Top
downunder View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote downunder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 18 2006 at 12:23pm
a billy is an Aussie word meaning a pot to boil water for a cuppa, usually made from alaminium and the handle is a peice of wire strung over the top from one side to the other. Can be as small as the tin can you have eaten the beans out of. Just punch two holes in opposite sides near the top of the can, and strin some wire through the holes. Use a stick to lift off the flame or the steam will burn your hand.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 7:23pm
The better way is to have a propane fired generator.  We have a 15 KW  standby hooked to a 500 gallon propane tank. That will give us  about 300 hrs of use.  The well ,in another building circuit is wired to a smaller gen and we have 100 gallons of stabilized gas for it.

If your serious about all this get prepared.  It will take at least 6 hrs a day to keep the frig cold and the house cool.  If this area is out of juice for that long--50 days-- we figure we can "borrow" other neighborhood propane tanks  as everyone else will be moved out.

Remember to only run the gen in the daytime as sound carries further at nite.  If you do run at nite be sure to have window covers as you do not want to advertize you have power.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 6:48pm
Generator safety issues:

(1) Do not add gasoline to hot generator. Let it cool down completely, until you can touch the exhaust pipe.

(2) Generator should be properly grounded. Use good 3-wire cables of adequatge capacity; no daisy chains.

(3) Exhaust fumes must not enter your living space - carbon monoxide is produced and is VERY toxic.

(4) Arrange generator so no contact with hot exhaust manifold is possible.

(5) Store gasoline away from generator.   
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 6:34pm
Solar power:

Cost of panels is about $3/Watt.
Panels need to be steered to track the sun for maximum output.
Above 40 degrees North, panels are less useful. Larger panel area needed.
A regulator is needed for charging batteries. Some batteries, particularly gel cells, are sensitive to the charging regime.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 17 2006 at 6:28pm
Generator gas consumption:
approx. 1 gallon for 8 hours at 1 KW load (Honda EU-2000i)
So, 8 KWH/gal.

Operating for 2 hours/day for 4 days would use about 1 gallon of gas. That's about 15 gallons/month. It's a LOT of gas to be storing!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 13 2006 at 12:18pm
Originally posted by dundeels01 dundeels01 wrote:

 They have 15- 5 gallon gas cans that were all empty.  When you open the fourth can, must refill the other three, that's what I do if my husband doesn't. We keep two out of normal usage which helps me know when he's on the fourth can.
 
The next time that I get down there, in the very near future, I'm going to go through Generator 101 with them again.  I wrote down EVERY STEP, from moving the generator into place to throwing the switch to disconnect from the city line to checking the oil, fuel, and hookups. To exactly how to start, load, and shut down. WRITE IT DOWN, put in a plastic document cover, attach to the generator. 
 
It really is something that most people should review on a somewhat regular basis, it probably would not hurt to actually perform a test run either if you have never done so in the past.  Our storm two weeks ago took our power (only a few hours, but we did not know what happened). For us, we have a water-well, no power, no water. Husband had me do all the steps following my notes from the December outages.
 
Many people take for granted that they will be able to run these things, but when it comes down to it, it is often not that easy or as safe as one would think. Found out that I did not know how to reset the Safety Pressure Switch in the pump house. More notes now attached inside the pump house and we bought a spare safety switch.
 
That's why you always hear of the carbon monoxide deaths of home owners and electrocutions of utility workers when these things are not used properly.
Sounds like you made sure the Utility Workers were protected. Carbon Monoxide detectors are important in the home. JaxMax made an interesting point, his detector went off from so many neighbors using their generators at night, they all agreed not to run generators while sleeping. Had not thought of that.
 
The only advice that I can give from my parents experience last night, is it is extremely important to be familiar with your equipment and know how to use it  because you never know when you just might actually need it. Good advice, thank you. 
Back to Top
gilmor View Drop Down
V.I.P. Member
V.I.P. Member


Joined: April 10 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 81
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gilmor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 08 2006 at 9:48pm

Recently read / heard that U.S. oil refineries CANNOT operate with 30% of employees off. . . These plants produce our gasoline, but also the fuels that run alot of our power plants.

Almost 20% of U.S. electricity is produced by nuclear power. Deregulation has forced all power companies to run lean and mean. I would think that like an oil refinery, a nuclear power plant could not operate with 30% of its work force off.

Both nuke fueled power plants and refineries are NOT light switch operations. . . Both MUST be slowly shut down and slowly restarted. . . Coal, natural gas and oil powered electrical generating plants are known as peakers within the industry and are especially used to quickly reach maximum output on hot (A/C usage) days. . .

just some thoughts,

Gilmore

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down